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Sunday, December 17
 

09:00

Generation Z: Are children conditioned to accept terms and conditions?

Organization: European Schoolnet - Insafe

Title: Generation Z: Are children conditioned to accept terms and conditions?

Description:

According to recent estimates, one in three internet users are children below the age of 18, with an increasing proportion living in the Global South. Members of the so-called “Generation Z” – born after the mid1990s – can spend up to nine hours a day sharing photos, consuming “content” and talking to friends online. The technical affordances of the internet have made it possible for digital platforms to collect and monetise large amounts of personal information from children. While young social media users will typically consider themselves as proficient, the Growing Up Digital report* published by the UK Children’s Commissioner in January 2017 found that children sign up for terms and conditions they do not understand.

(*http://www.childrenscommissioner.gov.uk/sites/default/files/publications/Growing%20Up%20Digital%20Taskforce%20Report%20January%202017_0.pdf.)

In this IGF session, we will discuss in how far children and young people understand the Terms and Conditions they agree upon when being online, downloading an app or creating an account on social media platforms. Based on this, we will start from an analysis of existing regulations and tensions, looking at key issues at stake to see what can be done to ameliorate the current situation in order to more comprehensively address the need to involve multiple stakeholders when promoting and ensuring digital rights of young people in the more global context, as a precondition for a more inclusive and sustainable online environment.

More specifically, the following perspectives will be represented during this session:
• Young people: Outlining the day-to-day challenges when being online and participating in social networks and downloading new applications. Calling for the need to make Terms and Conditions more accessible (e.g. easy language, short and to the point, highlighting key information accordingly).
• Industry: Presenting improvements that have been done so far in order to make Terms and Conditions more user friendly. Sharing, awareness raising efforts that have been put in place to give further support to users e.g.
safety checks, while outlining what is planned for the future based on outcomes presented in the Growing Up Digital report.
• Legislators/regulators: Ensuring that consumer rights are protected and align with a more global set of data protection standards.
• Education / online safety stakeholders: Outlining the importance of supporting young people in the digital age, emphasising on the necessity of including the subject of digital citizenship respective online safety in the curriculum.

In terms of format, panelists will first lay down the core principles and expectations they have in regards to online platform/services Terms and Conditions. Subsequently, participants will break out in parallel groups in order to discuss a number of specific cases, focusing in particular on how social media platform can (and should) communicate on data collection practices and purposes in an intelligible and transparent manner. In terms of outcomes, this will help to more clearly delineate the various multiple stakeholder views and concerns at stake, while identifying and instigating opportunities and best practices solutions in trying to reconcile these often diverging perspectives.

 


Sunday December 17, 2017 09:00 - 10:00
Salle 13 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

09:00

10 years of Internet Governance from the SSIG perspective

Organization: South School on Internet Governance - SSIG

Title: SSIG book "Internet Governance in the Americas"

Description:

By the time of its 10th anniversary in 2018, the South School on Internet Governance will publish the book "Internet Governance in the Americas"

The book will be edited by Dr. Luca Belli from the Getulio Vargas Foundation and by Dr. Olga Cavalli, Academic Director of the South School on Internet Governance.

It will cover different issues of interst related with Internet Governance with a focus in the Americas, and based on the dialogues held in the SSIG during its ten years of history.

Authors of the book are prestigious experts from the region. Some of them will join us during this session, they are:

Agustin Garzon,   Argentina
Beatriz Lopez,   Brazil
Belisario Contreras,   Colombia
Benedicto Fonseca,   Brazil
Bruno Ramos,   Brazil
Carlos Alvarez,   Colombia
Caterine Garcia,   Peru / Netherlands
Christoph Steck,   España
Claudio Lopez,   Brazil
Claudio Lucena,   Brazil
Edison Lanza,   Uruguay
Eduardo Molina, Quiroga Argentina
Gonzalo Navarro,   Chile
Horacio Azzolin,   Argentina
Humberto Carrasco,    Chile 
Jorge Vega Iracelay,   Argentina
Julio Cesar Vega Gomez,   México
Lacier Dias,   Brazil
Larry Strickling,   USA
Marcos Salt,   Argentina
Margarita Valdés,   Chile
Maryleana Mendez,   Costa Rica
Oscar Messano,   Argentina
Oscar Robles,   Mexico
Thiago Tavares,   Brazil
Pablo Rodriguez, Puerto Rico
Vanda Scartezzini, Brazil
Vanessa Fusco,   Brazil
Luca Belli,   Brazil / Italy
Demi Getschko,   Brazil
Peter Knight,   Brazil
Danilo Doneda,   Brazil
Eduardo Magrani,   Brazil

This session will also invite the Internet community to be informed about the location of the SSIG 2018, the call for applications and other important announcements in this regard.

All SSIG fellows are welcome to join us in this session and share stories and experiences from the South School on Internet Governance.




 


Session Organizers
avatar for Olga Cavalli

Olga Cavalli

Academic Director, South School on Internet Governance
ISOC Board of Trustees Member President ISOC Argentina chapter Former MAG Member - Advisor Committee to the United Nations Secretary General - IGF GAC Vicechair - ICANN - Argentina Representative Academic Director SSIG - South School on Internet Governance Academic Director - Dominios... Read More →


Sunday December 17, 2017 09:00 - 10:30
Salle 2 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

09:00

Founding meeting of a Dynamic Coalition on Schools of Internet Governance

Organization: Medienstadt Leipzig e.V.

Title: Founding meeting of a Dynamic Coalition on Schools of Internet Governance

Description:

During the IGF in Guadalajara organisers of various Schools on Internet Governance (SIG) agreed to form a Dynamic Coalition on Internet Governance.

SIG enjoy the confidence of many Internet Governance institutions as the source for a high quality programmes about Internet Governance. So far the collaboration among the various SIGs is informal. SIG’s inspired each other and benefit from the lessons learned by others. 

After ten years of experiences the informal collaboration should continue more focused by establishing a flexible structure which would allow more synergies among the SIGs. A Dynamic Coalition SIG seems like a feasible format in this regard. 

The DC-SIG should serve as a platform to exchange experiences and good practices and to coordinate, where necessary, activities (inter alia, time tables and outreach activities). The DC-SIG should have a “Collaboration team” and a focal point for administrative matters. The Collaboration team should be composed by one representative from each regional / national SIG.

As a basis for this meeting we will set up a basic infrastructure (mailing list, web space) and a draft a work plan, mission statement and a proposal how to structure the DC.

 


Sunday December 17, 2017 09:00 - 10:30
Salle 6 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

09:00

ICANNWiki Edit-a-thon

Organization: ICANNWiki

Title: ICANNWiki Edit-a-thon

Description:

The ICANNWiki Edit-a-thon is an opportunity for experts in the field of Internet governance to come together and create accessible, creative commons content in their field of expertise or specific interests. This content will be published on ICANNWiki as is immediately available worldwide. There will be a specific focus on creating translated or localized content. Currently languages available include Arabic, Chinese, English, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish and Swahili. We will also provide a platform for additional languages upon request.

 


Sunday December 17, 2017 09:00 - 10:30
Salle 18 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

09:00

SIDS Preparatory Meeting for IGF 2018
Sunday December 17, 2017 09:00 - 11:00
Salle 5 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

09:00

IGF LAC Space

Organization: IGF LAC SPACE

Title: IGF LAC SPACE

Description:

A meeting to gather LAC Community members before the IGF starts in order to know each other and share attendant's involvement in IGF sessions.
This will be the second edition of this meeting since we have a previous one during IGF 2016 in Guadalajara with an attendance of around 50 people.
https://igf2016.sched.com/event/8hs8/igf-lac-space
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GaKfh7kuysw

 


Sunday December 17, 2017 09:00 - 12:00
Salle 14 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

09:00

Working Toward Universal Access: Educate, Engage and Empower

Organization: IEEE

Title: Working Toward Universal Access: Educate, Engage and Empower

Description:

The potential for economic, civil and societal benefit that the internet can bring to communities around the world is indisputable. We can see the positive impact of the internet on world citizens when they gain online and mobile access to information, community and services, and more so when they are empowered by access to innovate as they work toward opportunities and solutions for themselves and their communities. But how to realize universal internet access to enable these benefits still remains a challenge. Addressing these challenges takes unprecedented transparent collaboration and coordination across stakeholders, disciplines, industry sectors and technical domains, and across geographic and political borders, cultures and economies.

This working session will bring together several global working groups working in the space of universal access—including those working on digital literacy, public access and community networks, innovative and alternative business models, finance and investment, evidenced-based research and digital equality so that IGF participants can learn about the work of these groups and the progress they are making. More importantly, participants will directly engage with and join the groups where they can contribute their ideas and help inform the work of these groups, pose questions and collaborate on answers. They can then take their findings, new information and concepts with them into their communities, work places, schools, etc., to help progress programs and initiatives; and they can use what they learned at the Day Zero event throughout their participation in the overall IGF program sessions.

 


Sunday December 17, 2017 09:00 - 13:00
Salle 21+22 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

09:00

Collaborative Leadership Exchange (CLX) on 'Shaping the Digital Future'

Organization: Internet Society

Title: Collaborative Leadership Exchange (CLX) on 'Shaping the Digital Future'

Description:

The ‘Collaborative Leadership Exchange (CLX) on Shaping the Digital Future’ is a one-day session designed to contribute to building and fostering communities of engagement and action, and create a multiplier effect on the multistakeholder participation theme throughout the IGF week, and beyond. All IGF participants are welcome to attend. The Collaborative Leadership Exchange builds on a successful model first launched at the 2012 Global INET and then replicated at IGF meetings in Bali (2013), Istanbul (2014), João Pessoa (2015), and Guadalajara (2016). The session will take the format of an unconference, with equal parts of peer-to-peer style learning and engagement, networking and relationship building, interactive discussions and promotion of increased collaboration across the Internet ecosystem. The session will be supported and attended by partners such as DotAsia, Youth@IGF, IEEE, APC and others.

NOTE: Pre-registration is required for this event as there is limited seating capacity available.

Interested persons can register for the event here: http://bit.ly/2gPomva

 


Session Organizers
avatar for Niel Harper

Niel Harper

Senior Manager, Next Generation Leaders Programmes, Internet Society
Niel Harper is the Senior Manager of the Next Generation Leaders Programmes at the Internet Society where he oversees a number of initiatives focused on developing the next generation of leaders who can address the complex issues at the intersection of technology, policy, and business... Read More →


Sunday December 17, 2017 09:00 - 14:00
Salle 3 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

09:00

Human rights based cybersecurity strategy
A rights-based approach to cybersecurity: A pipe dream or a critical means to a secure and stable internet?
Pre-event to the 2017 Internet Governance Forum

Sunday, 17 December 2017
Centre International de Conférences Genève, Salle 4

Convened by the Association for Progressive Communications (APC), Centre for Communications Governance at National Law University Delhi (CCG), Centre for Internet and Society (CIS), Derechos Digitales, Citizen Lab, Global Partners Digital (GPD), Internet Society (ISOC), UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), and Privacy International

Download APC's briefing document on cybersecurity and human rights

Programme

09:00-09:15 Registration and welcome: Deborah Brown (APC)

09:15-10:15 Framing: What do we mean by a rights-based approach to cybersecurity? Is such an approach a pipe-dream, or an essential means to a secure and trusted internet?

Panelists:  Chinmayi Arun (CCG), Kathy Brown (ISOC), Marietje Schaake (European Parliament), Francisco Vera Hott (Privacy International)

Moderator:  Peggy Hicks (OHCHR)

10:15-11:45 Year in review: Overview of current initiatives in cybersecurity and stability.

A panel will provide basic outlines of current initiatives including the following: Group of Governmental Experts (GGE); London process (GCCS); Global Commission on the Stability of Cyberspace (GCSC); Microsoft’s “Geneva Convention”, among others. Panellists will be asked to reflect on the extent to which these initiatives are or are not, adopting a “rights-based” approach.

Panellists: Mehwish Ansari (ARTICLE 19), Madeline Carr (Cardiff University); Lea Kaspar (GPD),  Kaja Ciglic (Microsoft); Markus Kummer (IGF Best Practice Forum on Cybersecurity), and Chrystiane Roy (Government of Canada)

Moderator: Irene Poetranto (Citizen Lab)

11:45-12:15 Tea/coffee break

12:15-13:15 Deep dive on cybersecurity and human rights issues: What are the obvious risks and challenges? How do policy and norms impact on the human rights and security of people? What are the ‘not-so-obvious’ issues at stake? Who controls the mainstream cybersecurity narrative? Does this need to be challenged, and if so, how?

Panellists: Maarten van Horenbeeck (Technical community); Maryant Fernández (European Digital Rights Initiative); Maria Paz Canales (Derechos Digitales); Luis Fernando García (Red en Defensa de los Derechos Digitales)

Moderator: Lucie Krahulcova (AccessNow)

13:15-14:00 Closing remarks from event convenors outlining possible approaches towards consolidating a rights-based and inclusive approach to cybersecurity.

Speakers:  Sunil Abraham (Centre for Internet and Society) and Matthew Shears (GPD)

Moderator: Anriette Esterhuysen (APC)


Sunday December 17, 2017 09:00 - 14:00
Salle 4 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

09:00

The 12th Annual Symposium of the Global Internet Governance Academic Network (GigaNet)

Organization: GigaNet

Title: The 12th Annual Symposium of the Global Internet Governance Academic Network

Description:

GigaNet is an international association of academic researchers founded in 2006 to support multidisciplinary research on Internet governance. Its membership includes researchers from all over the world who are contributing to local, regional and international debates on Internet Governance. The theme of this year’s Symposium is "INTERNET GOVERNANCE IN A TIME OF GLOBAL REORDERING."

Symposium Schedule

9:00 – 9:10  Welcome

Marianne Franklin, Giganet Steering Committee Chair, and Milton Mueller, Program Committee Chair

9:10 – 9:30 Digital Trade
Jeremy Malcolm: Contested Meanings of Inclusiveness, Accountability and Transparency in Trade Policymaking

9:35 – 10:20 The ICANN regime

Undra Baasanjav: International Domain Names (IDNs) and Language Rights
Aaron van Klyton, Soomaree and Arrieta Paredes: The multistakeholder model of Internet governance, ICANN, and the business sector: Practices of hegemonic power 

10:20 – 10:50 Coffee break 

10:50 – 11:35 The ICANN regime (continued)

Jan Aarte Scholte: Complex Hegemony: The IANA Transition in Global Internet Governance
Mark Datysgeld : Understanding the role of States in Global Internet Governance: ICANN as a case study

11:40 – 12:30 Governance of personal data

 René Mahieu, Hadi Asgahri and Michel van Eeten: MAPPED: Creating an evidence base for assessing the effectiveness of the right of access for transparency and user control
Amanda Nunes Lopes Espiñeira Lemos and Lahis Pasquali Kurtz: Sovereignty over personal data in Brazil 

12:30 – 2:00 Lunch 

Poster session:

  • Hans Klein: A Holistic Model of Internet Development and Governance
  • Rafael Prince and Nathalia Patrício: Net neutralities: no neutral definition
  • Brenden Kuerbis and Farzaneh Badiei: Mapping the cybersecurity institutional landscape
  • Raphael Beauregard-Lacroix: Who Owns the Addresses? The IPv4 Addresses Distribution Process, Its Actors and Their Legal Entitlements

2:00 – 2:45  Sovereignty in cyberspace

Stéphane Couture and Sophie Toupin: What Does the Concept of “Sovereignty” Mean in Digital, Network and Technological Sovereignty? 
Sara Solmone: Fulfilling freedom of expression online: The problem of access-based jurisdictional approach in Internet-related cases

2:50 – 4:00  Governance by private actors

Kseniia Ermoshina and Francesca Musiani: Standardizing by running code: The Signal protocol
Louise Marie Hurel and Luisa Lobato: Unpacking Cybernorms: Private companies as norms entrepreneurs
Natasha Tusikov: Internet Firms as Global Regulators

4:00 – 5:15 National regimes

Fabricio Solagna and Diego R. Canabarro: The participation of nongovernmental stakeholders in Internet governance in Brazil: An assessment of CGI.br’s elections 
Yik Chan Chin and Changfeng Chen: Internet Governance in China: Exploration of Power Relationship 
Gianluigi Negro: The Global Construction of the Chinese Internet, 1994 – 2014

5:10 – 6:00  GigaNet business meeting

 


Session Organizers
avatar for Milton Mueller

Milton Mueller

School of Public Policy


Sunday December 17, 2017 09:00 - 18:00
Salle 15 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

10:00

IGF Newcomers and Youth Track: Introductory Session

The Track aims to help participants attending the IGF annual meeting for the first time, to understanding the IGF processes and to foster the integration of all new-coming stakeholders into the IGF community. 

Its focus is to make the meeting participant's first IGF experience as productive and welcoming as possible. In addition, the Track will especially focus on engaging youth in the discussions that reflect their role in the IGF process.

Session Structure:

This session will include an introduction on the IGF processes from the IGF Secretariat and respective community members.

It will be followed by a substantive training on the nature of the Internet, its different layers and systems with identifying some of the major policy issues and actions delivered by CENTR, EuroISPA, RIPE NCC.


Sunday December 17, 2017 10:00 - 11:30
Salle 13 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

10:30

The challenges of Digital Identity Management in the era of Internet of Things (IoT)

Organization: International Secure Electronic Transactions Organisation - OISTE

Title: The challenges of Digital Identity Management in the era of Internet of Things (IoT)

Description:

The Internet of Things opens new challenges for persons, companies, organisations and governments. What solutions are being proposed to ensure that objects that interact with each other will not be maliciously manipulated? What are the conditions to create a secure ecosystem where objects identify and authentify each other? What is the role played by the individual consumer? At what point on the production and distribution chanel operate companies offering cybersecurity solutions? What is the role played by governments? What are the responsibilities of the state vis a vis their citizens' security concerns? Do we need some kind of regulation? Do we need agreed international technical standards and protocols to create a secure technical environment?

 


Sunday December 17, 2017 10:30 - 11:30
Salle 2 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

10:30

Second Meeting of All Schools of Internet Governance (All SIG Meeting)

Organization: Asia Pacific School on Internet Governance (APSIG)

Title: Second Meeting of All Schools of Internet Governance (All SIG Meeting)

Description:National and regional schools of Internet governance in Asia Pacific meet to
update on their activities and discuss on common issues. We also welcome
schools of Internet governance of other continents.


Sunday December 17, 2017 10:30 - 12:00
Salle 18 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

10:30

The battle for freedom of expression online: Where are the journalists?

Organization: Center for International Media Assistance & International Media Support (IMS)

Title: The battle for freedom of expression online: Where are the journalists?

Description:

Online surveillance, phishing, content blocking, and the right to be forgotten are all familiar territory for many journalists as they uncover corruption, report on human rights abuses, and other politically charged topics. Their rights to freedom of expression and privacy are challenged and repressed on a near-daily basis as the internet continues to shape and define the environment in which all media operate. But despite the profound implications of internet governance on the news media and the ability of journalists to exercise their rights, journalists and news media are largely absent from the world of internet governance.

The general absence of the media is problematic because some of the most-discussed issues at forums like IGF have direct effects on how journalists and news media outlets operate, including for example the “right to be forgotten”, intermediary liability, and internet shutdowns — all issues with potential negative impact on press freedom as well as ultimately, citizens’ right to access to information. In order to enhance the credibility and legitimacy of the multi-stakeholder Internet governance model, it is critical that media – in particular those from the Global South who are often disproportionately affected by efforts to limit free speech – get involved in internet governance. 

At this roundtable we will define key priorities of the global media development community in getting more systematically involved in Internet governance. This includes collaboratively designing priorities and ensuring that journalists from the Global South are able to contextualise the impact of global internet governance discussions. 

Journalists and the media sector need to be more involved in shaping the digital future of our global media ecosystem. This roundtable will address how to make the multistakeholder Internet governance model more robust by incorporating journalists and the media sector more broadly in the discussions. This includes both how to improve journalistic coverage of global Internet governance decisions, as well as make sure that the media are represented as active stakeholders in the governance processes at forums like IGF, IETF, ICANN, ITU, and IEEE. This panel will follow a consultative process being organized by CIMA, IMS, and GFMD throughout 2017 to define key priorities of the global media development community in getting more systematically involved in internet governance. Input at this roundtable will shape future interventions at Internet governance bodies to make sure that the policies and standards will foster vibrant and open media ecosystems.

 


Sunday December 17, 2017 10:30 - 12:00
Salle 6 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

11:00

Good Governance is a Professional Standard, which builds Trust and Cybersecurity in the entire digital ecosystem
See attached pdf (under presentations) for session description.Presentations will be made available after the session.

Session Organizers
avatar for Moira de Roche

Moira de Roche

Chair, IFIP IP3
IFIP IP3 "Partnering for Trust in Digital" is campaigning for Trust in Digital, which incorporates the Duty of Care, and professionalizing Cyber Security. All this is part of our mission to create and maintain ICT as a global profession.



Sunday December 17, 2017 11:00 - 13:00
Salle 5 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

11:30

Internet Shutdowns in Gambia

Organization: Give1Project

Title: Internet Shutdowns in Gambia

Description:

Discussing about internet shutdowns in Gambia. This event will discuss about internet shutdown during elections citing The Gambia as an exampe

 


Sunday December 17, 2017 11:30 - 13:00
Salle 13 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

11:30

Leveraging business expertise to foster an enabling environment for the digital economy

Organization: International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) Business Action to Support the Information Society (BASIS)

Title: Leveraging business expertise to foster an enabling environment for the digital economy

Description:

Private sector activity and investment in information and communications technology (ICT) infrastructure, content and services is critically important to spreading meaningful access to ICT and leveraging technology for societal benefit and developing solutions to address the many areas of development articulated by the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and other needs raised by local communities.

Businesses in developed and developing countries contribute expertise and experience to support the digital economy in multiple ways through capacity building, education initiatives, promoting innovation, public-private research and development partnerships, or improving understanding about how ICT works in practice. However, in order to reap the benefits ICT and private sector activity have to offer, policy-makers must create legal and regulatory frameworks encourage investment and support innovation.

This event will convene business leaders and government representatives familiar and new to the IGF for an interactive discussion on the efforts needed to ensure and an enabling policy environment for the digital economy.

Businesses large and small will be invited to participate and share their expertise and experience on the social, technical, economic and governance factors that contribute to leveraging ICT for societal benefit in developed and developing countries. Robust exchanges between diverse business and governmental experts with case examples will provide, participants with a greater understanding of the mutually reinforcing role businesses and governments can play in collaboration with other relevant stakeholders, to ensure the benefits of ICT are widespread and empowering for citizens.

Thus, panelists and participants are invited to share their experience, lessons learnt and challenges (to be) addressed when leading / collaborating on projects aimed to leverage ICT for sustainable development.

Chair:
Ms Ellen Blackler (The Walt Disney Company, USA)

Panelists
Mr Omar Mansoor Ansari (TechNation, Afghanistan)
Mr Bobby Bedi (Kaleidoscope Entertainment, India)
Ms Ankhi Das (Facebook, India)
Mr Hossam Elgamal (Information and Decision Support Centre, Egypt)
Mr Jivan Gjorgjinski (Macedonia)
Ms Dominique Lazanski (GSMA, UK)
Mr Juuso Moisander (Ministry of External Affairs, Finland)
Mr Robert L. Strayer (USA)

Discussants:
Ms Jennifer Chung (DotAsia, Hong Kong)
Mr Charles Bradley (GPD, UK)

Moderator:

Ms Carolyn Nguyen (Microsoft, USA)


Session Organizers
avatar for Timea Suto

Timea Suto

Project Coordinator, ICC BASIS
Timea coordinates activities and input for ICC’s Business Action to Support the Information Society (BASIS). In this role she helps bring together experts that make up the global membership of the advocacy initiative. BASIS acts as the voice of business and facilitates business... Read More →


Sunday December 17, 2017 11:30 - 13:00
Salle 2 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

12:00

The GIPO Observatory Tool and what´s next for policy observatories

Organization: Global Internet Policy Observatory

Title: The GIPO Observatory Tool and what´s next for policy observatories

Description:

The Global Internet Policy Observatory and Observatory Tool were initiated in 2012 by the European Commission in an effort to overcome the fragmentation of information and to enable more informed policy making, especially for those who face difficulties with accessing the information. The GIPO Observatory Tool is available for usage since this year and the most recent example of its incorporation is EuroDig website.

This workshop is aimed to built on and further develop discussions initiated during previous GIPO´s and 2 previous IGF observatories´ workshops on the landscape of the mapping initiatives and observatories, as well as their sustainability in the future.

Participants: policy observatories, mapping initiatives, NRIs, civic societies

 


Sunday December 17, 2017 12:00 - 13:30
Salle 14 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

12:00

Towards a global citizens debate on the digital future: involving 'day-to-day'citizens from all over the planet

Organization: MISSIONS PUBLIQUES - Savoir Devenir

Title: Towards a global citizens debate on the digital future: involving "day-to-day"citizens from all over the planet

Description:

The global discussion on the Internet and its future has reached a certain inertia after a decade of decision-shaping forums (IGF, WSIS, NetMundial, ICANN,…). New issues are emerging that modify the rules and potentially change the routines: fake news, propaganda, algorithm regulation, … In all these debates, difficulty to reach out to the public at large and yet there is a maturation of the public, concerned over massive surveillance, big data exploitation, privacy infringements, robotization of jobs… Citizens are ready to understand complex issues, to contribute to the vision for the future and to offer their prospective to stakeholders. So there is timeliness and urgency in reaching out to day to day citizens voices and to bring up their perspective from the bottom up.
The purpose of this event is an exploration of the interest to associate at large scale in a “collective intelligence” procedure day-to-day citizens from 100+ different countries. The proposed planetary debate will produce the results of an informed public opinion on the key choices at the root of our digital future : Fragementation vs unicity, neutrality, regulation, capacity, access, security, literacy, harrassment … without framing them a priori.

 


Session Organizers
AV

Antoine Vergne

International Projects manager, Missions Publiques
How to involve ordinary citizens into global internet governance?


Sunday December 17, 2017 12:00 - 13:30
Salle 18 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

12:00

Pre-Conference Seminar for CLDP Supported Participants

Organization: Commercial Law Development Program

Title: Pre-Conference Seminar for CLDP Supported Participants

Description:

Orientation seminar/briefing on relevant issues and on the functions and activities of the IGF, designed specifically for participants being supported by the Commercial Law Development Program.

 


Sunday December 17, 2017 12:00 - 15:00
Salle 6 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

13:00

Data donation: auditing socially relevant algorithms

Organization: Algorithm Watch

Title: Data donation: auditing socially relevant algorithms

Description:

Do we live in different worlds, when we search for political topics online? Germany had a general election in autumn 2017 and facts and figures about digital dissemination of knowledge – or disinformation- and potential manipulation mechanisms that may affect individuals therein are scarce. This is in contrast to those spheres in our well-established newspaper and magazine landscape. Algorithm Watch has set up the "Datenspende Bundestagswahl 2017” a project aiming to provide both for facts and figures – as well as for tools for anyone also wanting to produce their own analysis. Moreover, the harvested data is also public and can be analyzed by anyone. The project was funded by a consortium of German media authorities and is supported by SpiegelOnline as our media partner. (datenspende.algorithmwatch.org)

The project is a proof-of-concept showing that society is actually able to audit socially relevant algorithms by combining the efforts of individuals - both as data donors and data analysts. This principle might be transferrable to audit other social networks.

 


Session Organizers
avatar for Lorena Jaume-Palasí

Lorena Jaume-Palasí

Executive Director, AlgorithmWatch


Sunday December 17, 2017 13:00 - 14:00
Salle 21+22 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

13:00

Assessing Role of Internet in State-building Process: Help or Hinderance?

Organization: iRise Hub

Title: Founder

Description: Assessing Role of Internet in State-building Process: Help or Hinderance?

 


Sunday December 17, 2017 13:00 - 15:00
Salle 2 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

13:00

Towards Meaningful Multistakeholder Mechanisms in Internet Governance

Organization: UNESCO

Title: Towards Meaningful Multistakeholder Mechanisms in Internet Governance

 

Topic summary

With support of ICANN and ISOC, UNESCO is launching the new publication “What if we all governed the Internet: Advancing multistakeholder participation in Internet governance” as the 11th edition within the UNESCO Internet Freedom series. It was commissioned to achieve better understanding the ways in which multi-stakeholder participation mechanisms have evolved since the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) more than ten years ago. Serving as an authoritative and influential knowledge resource for the range of stakeholders, the publication will help raise awareness and promote multi-stakeholder practice in internet governance around the world.

The session will welcome diverse actors and stakeholders that have been and remain involved in multi-stakeholder processes to compare and analyze their experiences as cited in the report. The session will aim to find some common ground to develop indicators and recommendations to support multi-stakeholder processes in the future, both at the IGF and beyond.

The session will be an interactive discussion built on a brief introduction of the research at the beginning and short remarks from panellists. The majority of the time will be dedicated to the Q and A with the audience and participants.

The session will also see the launching of the Portuguese and Spanish versions of UNESCO’s publication Keystones to foster inclusive Knowledge Societies with the participation of Brazilian Ambassador Benedicto Fonseca.

 

Joint  Moderators (5’): Mr. Guy Berger, UNESCO Director for Freedom of Expression and Media Development and Ms Xianhong Hu, UNESCO Internet Specialist

 

Welcome remarks:

5’’ Mr. Frank La Rue, UNESCO ADG for Communication and information

5’ Ms. Constance Bommelaer de Leusse, ISOC

5’ Mr. Chris Disspain, ICANN

 

Presentation (10’) Ms. Anri van der Spuy, the UNESCO commissioned author of the research

 

Speakers:

5’ Prof Kyung Sin (KS) Park, Korea University Law School

5’ Ms. Jac SM Kee, APC

5’ Mr. Benedicto Fonseca, Brazilian Ambassador for Internet issues

5’ Ms. Grace Githaiga, Kenya ICT Action Network

 

10’ Book Launch of Portuguese and Spanish versions of "Keystones to foster inclusive Knowledge Societies" by Mr Guy Berger and Mr Benedicto Fonseca

 

60’ Discussion

 

Rapporteur:  Ms. Xianhong Hu, UNESCO

 

Remote moderator: Mr Guilherme Canela, UNESCO

 

Notes and photos: Mr. Zhaocan Li, UNESCO

 


Session Organizers

Sunday December 17, 2017 13:00 - 15:00
Salle 13 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

13:00

Youth for Rights

Organization: Youth for Rights (Y4R)

Title: Youth for Rights

Description:

Internet is an important and ubiquitous social, economic, political, cultural, educational, and communication platform for societies worldwide. Legal, political, and social issues are increasingly being decided in internet policy discussions. These discussions and policy decisions have a major impact on young people, and are often made without their involvement or consideration despite being the largest demographic of internet users.

The Youth for Rights is a initiative for young people to learn about the many digital rights issues impacting them. Attendees will participate in an 8 hours workshop, walking through policy, advocacy, movement building, and technological discussions led by trainers/experts from digital rights community. Participants will be able to learn and engage on issues of: open source technology and development, data protection and privacy, network discrimination and connectivity, digital security, diversity and digital inclusion, human rights, trade and business, and more.

The objectives and goal for the Youth for Rights is to:

- Improve young people’s understanding of internet policy impact on youth.
- Help develop practical advocacy skills for youth for engagement in digital rights and policy discussions.
- Provide a platform for young people to raise and discuss digital rights that affect them.
- To provide a greater sense and knowledge on digital rights issues to the youth.
- To enable the capacity and capability of younger generation on mapping the digital rights issues and solution in their respective communities. 

 


Sunday December 17, 2017 13:00 - 18:00
Salle 5 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

13:30

Reflections from the Forum on Internet Freedom in Africa

Organization: Collaboration on International ICT Policy for East and Southern Africa (CIPESA)

Title: Reflections from the Forum on Internet Freedom in Africa

Description:

We will share insights and learning and emerging from discussions from the September 2017 Forum on Internet Freedom in Africa (FIFAfrica) - an annual gathering which convenes multi-stakeholders from across the continent to discuss current trends impacting internet freedom. For the first time, we will have hosted the Forum outside of East Africa where we have a history of setting the agenda for suggesting actions towards overcoming the challenges and leveraging opportunities to advance internet freedom in Africa. This year, we aim to have a Southern Africa perspective following the hosting of the Forum in Johannesburg, South Africa. As such, we are co-hosting the Forum alongside the Association for Progressive Communications (APC), a long-time collaborator of CIPESA. The FIFAfrica will explore discussion on topics including litigation for digital rights, digital security, the economic impacts of internet shutdown, violence online, fake news and more from an African perspective.

Thus, we seek to share bite-sized highlights from FIFAfrica with the audience in Geneva to have a greater sense of the dynamics that internet users are facing in the continent. This will be coupled with dissemination of indepth reports on the State of Internet Freedom 2017 of various countries including South Africa, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Kenya, Rwanda, Uganda, DR Congo and Tanzania.

 


Sunday December 17, 2017 13:30 - 15:00
Salle 18 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

13:30

The Need for a Digital Geneva Convention in Times of Cyber(In)Security

Organization: Microsoft

Title: The Need for a Digital Geneva Convention in Times of Cyber(In)Security

Description:

Sophisticated cyber attacks, increasingly carried out by nation states or their proxies, are on the rise. While there has been significant discussion at the international level about appropriate norms of behavior in cyberspace, progress has been mixed. Microsoft and other private sector actors have called for a "Digital Geneva Convention" to help address these challenges. 
This event is intended to explore the ideas underlying a "Digital Geneva Convention" in more detail, clarify the key concepts and bring in multi-stakeholder perspectives on how to move the debate on cybersecurity norms of behavior forward.

 


Sunday December 17, 2017 13:30 - 15:00
Salle 14 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

14:00

Day Zero: Creating a World of Inclusion in social and economic opportunities for Women from developing countries

Organization: TechWomen and ICT Strategies

Title: Day Zero: Creating a World of Inclusion in social and economic opportunities for Women from developing countries

Description:

Women’s economic empowerment is increasingly recognized as vital to improving individual and family lives, but also to contributing to the economic growth of countries – whatever their size. There is a Chinese proverb that “Women hold up half the sky”. While this a reality in terms of population distribution, it is not yet a reality in terms of social and economic opportunity. This Day Zero session will be focusing on building more awareness across a diverse geography about projects that are focused on economic empowerment of women and girls. Numerous projects are underway that are focused on STEM initiatives, and on creating digital skills for girls, as they progress through school. Yet, this is not a full solution, as many of the jobs that could be self-developed, or may be emerging from the digitization of all work require that women of all ages interested in meaningful and paid work, have digital skills, basic literacy, access to technology and the Online/Internet services are yet to be fully developed. While supporting building digital skills at all levels for girls and women, this Day Zero event is focused on the practical realities: Creating a path to employment for women, wherever they are in the world, and regardless of their level of digital skills so they can contribute to their own economic security, their families, their villages, and their countries economic and social development. 

Drawing from experiences of Tech Nation’s TechWomen in Afghanistan, and organizations now working in Nigeria, South Africa, Pakistan, and joined by invited experts from the World Bank, UNCTAD, CSTD’s Gender Advisory Committee, Alliance for Affordable Internet, My Digital Bridges - Namibia and other successful women entrepreneurial initiatives are invited to a working roundtable. Each presenter will have a five-minute slot and are invited to provide a one to two-page summary of their initiatives. Outreach is underway to different and newcomers to the IGF as contributors, such as Goldman Sachs, Walmart, Starbucks. Mastercard Foundation and others who do not normally attend the IGF but have a strong interest in women empowerment. 

After an initial round of 5-minute lightning talks, the group will be sub divided into small working groups to draft an shared agenda for action for 2018, to be presented again at Day Zero IGF2018. 

So many of the countries that we are focused on are very “young” with more than 40+% under that age of 30 – the digitalized world is the world that they have to succeed in. Yet, we have to also recognize that "digitization" is affecting many jobs – those of health care givers, farmers, … these areas can be opportunities for women to gain skills and move into a work force, that was previously closed to them. But to make that step forward, in many countries, changes are essential in many areas: they need legal acknowledgement of their rights, they need education in literacy, in digital skills, and in encouragement to find their role in a working environment. And they need basic and affordable access to the online world, affordable devices

We are inviting a number of entities that are engaged in community action activities that lead to women employment – whether in agriculture, community service, healthcare, government services, tech world… to discuss what the critical success factors are to encourage catalyzing that as we focus on bringing the next 1.5 billion online are at least 50% women. The output of the Day Zero event will be taken back into the participating organizations at the national levels to help catalyze further engagement, and plans are to provide a report on Day Zero in 2018 from the activities that occur as a result of this interaction at 2017. 

 


Sunday December 17, 2017 14:00 - 16:00
Salle 21+22 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

14:00

Women and LGBTQI in the IGF

Organization: E.I. Research

Title: Women and LGBTQI in the IGF #IGFem #IGFLGBTQI

Description:

Reuniting the women and LGBTQI who participate in several of the IGF spaces (NRIs, intersessionals etc.) to exchange knowledge, network and create collaboration projects to strengthen the IGF.

Specific objectives:
-Create an official space in the agenda for the women and LGBTQI attending the multiple IGF spaces in the global IGF.
-Enable the exchange of knowledge, information and experiences about the nature of IGF and why it is important for gender issues.
-Networking space.
-Providing information about the activities, projects and investigations on gender issues in the multiple spaces of IGF.

 


Session Organizers
avatar for Angie Contreras

Angie Contreras

Youth Observatory /SIG Woman
ISOC Ambassador 2017 | Comunicadora y feminista | Activista digital, blogger en @MConstruyendo y el #BlogAngie | Directora de la revista @QuintaesenciaR| Chair SIG Women
avatar for Renata Aquino Ribeiro

Renata Aquino Ribeiro

Researcher, E.I.
MAG IGF CS. Full bio: http://bit.ly/renataineng


Sunday December 17, 2017 14:00 - 16:00
Salle 3 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

14:00

Disruptive Digital Literacies in the Era of Data Governance: Addressing Generation 'Z', with and beyond Education? organized by Council of Europe in association with Savoir*Devenir

DISRUPTIVE DIGITAL LITERACIES IN THE ERA OF DATA GOVERNANCE:

ADDRESSING ‘GENERATION Z’, WITH AND BEYOND EDUCATION

 

Pre-Event by the Council of Europe in association with Savoir*Devenir

 

CICG Geneva - Centre International de Conférences, Rue de Varembé 17, Geneva

17 December 2017, 14:00-17:00, Salle 4


Rationale

This event examines the future of digital literacies and education with regard to data flows and their impact.  At the forefront are Artificial Intelligence, Learning Analytics and the Internet of Things which makes data governance of critical importance for many actors and sectors in society (labour, health, safety, etc.) as well as for the self-determination of future generations including ‘Milennials’ and the even younger ‘Generation Z’. The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is setting the pace for the dynamic exercise and implementation of individual management of personal data, with the right to privacy, to data portability, etc.  

Data governance cannot put the burden only on individual responsibility, it should be shared with governments, institutions and structures. So how do we manage the disruption caused by data flows? What digital literacy do we want? What education do we need to prepare the next generation of learners, workers and citizens? What policies for policy-makers and public sector professionals? How can the private sector and civil society contribute, support and benefit?


Draft Agenda

Opening remarks by Divina Frau-Meigs, Professeur Sorbonne Nouvelle, Présidente Savoir*Devenir

Opening Statements by Frank La Rue, Assistant Director-General Communication and Information, UNESCO & Villano Qiriazi, Head of Education Policy Division, Council of Europe
 

Tour de table on insights, lessons learned and perspectives:

I. HARNESSING BIG DATA FOR EDUCATION: E-STRATEGIES FOR ALL

Moderated by Jasmina Byrne, Senior research, UNICEF Innocenti

Key questions to be addressed: How much control over data? What data portability? Critical Thinking vs Magic Thinking? What platform and media responsibility?

Open discussion with input from:

Carl Gahnberg, Global public Policy, ISOC
Pascale Serrier
, Commission nationale de l'informatique et des libertés, CNIL (TBC)
Jelena Mocevic
, European Heritage Days 

Respondent: Ruxa Pandea, No Hate Speech and Cooperation, Council of Europe


II. ENABLING YOUNG PEOPLE (‘GEN Z’) IN FORMAL AND INFORMAL EDUCATION: COMPETENCES

Moderated by Villano Qiriazi, Head of Education Policy Division, Council of Europe

Key questions to be addressed: How are young people prepared? Preparedness for e-citizenship?

Open discussion with input from:

Larry Magid, Founder Connect Safely and CBS
Elisabeth Milovidov,
Consultant and Coach on Digital Parenting
Janice Richardson, Senior consultant on children’s rights, education and awareness (Insight)
Stephen Wyber
, Policy and Research Officer, International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA)
Sophie Valais, Analyst, European Audiovisual Observatory

Respondent: Anca Sandescu, Human rights education and minority rights, trainer on hate speech related issues
 

III. SKILLS FOR CITIZENS AND WORKING ADULTS: DIGITAL LIFELONG TRAINING AND BEYOND

Co-moderated by Janice Richardson, Senior consultant on children’s rights, education and awareness (Insight) & Elisabeth Milovidov, Consultant and Coach on Digital Parenting 

Key questions to be addressed: How are citizens skilled and how are these skills updated? What needs, values and competences should be included? How is their agency solicited? How is the capacity to interact/contribute? What level of citizen control/ownership is available to them? How can governments and private sector enable and be enabled?

Open discussion with input from:

Marilia Maciel, Digital Policy Senior Researcher, DiploFoundation
Mathieu Muselet
, Open Badge, la Ligue de l’enseignement    
Yves Mathieu, co-founder, Missions Publiques 

Respondent: Menno Ettema, No Hate Speech and Cooperation, Council of Europe 

 

IV. MAPPING DISRUPTIVE DIGITAL LITERACIES - TOWARDS GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP CONSULTATION AND DIALOGUE

Closing remarks: Divina Frau Meigs, Professeur, Sorbonne Nouvelle, President Savoir*Devenir.  


Session Organizers
LH

Lee Hibbard

Internet governance coordinator, Council of Europe


Sunday December 17, 2017 14:00 - 17:00
Salle 4 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

15:00

Teaching Philosophy in Digital Age

Organization: Center For Law and Technology

Title: " Teaching Philsophy in Digital Age"

Description:

The researcher has present his syllabus made last year which he has teaching in the undergraduate level. However, this is first hand experience sharing of their experiences(among 100 students, 3 section and 144 hours of teaching) of the course. The subject name is "Philosophy and Logical Thoughts" while the readings from different chapter from various books; Thinking in a digital age, Thinking differently, The fourth digital revolution etc.

The researcher will share the experiences of syllabus making process and the student's perception while teaching and the relevance of Information Communication and Technology education in the teaching of Philosophy.

 


Sunday December 17, 2017 15:00 - 16:00
Salle 6 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

15:00

How Digital activists are shaping the evolution of the Internet: the voice of civil society in ICANN

Organization: ICANN

Title: How Digital activists are shaping the evolution of the Internet: the voice of civil society in ICANN

Description:

This panel session will explore the role and voice in Internet Governance, particularly in ICANN, of civil society, spanning the non-profit and non-commercial sectors, academia and end-users. 

ICANN's Mission and Core Values require the organisation to reflect the broad geographic and cultural diversity of the Internet at all levels of policy development, and that ICANN's decision-making and the bottom-up, multistakeholder policy development processes are for the benefit of the Internet community as a whole. Civil society plays a key, integral role in ICANN, right in the middle of initiating and negotiating policy, and making decisions jointly by consensus with all other stakeholder groups involved. 
Civil society participants at ICANN have helped shape policies on a broad range of domain name topics, notably for improved transparency, privacy and freedom of expression. This was evident in the recent transition process for the stewardship of the IANA functions from the US Government to the global multi-stakeholder community, where it was resolved that the ICANN Bylaws be clarified to add a specific commitment to respect human rights. 

Panel discussion

We believe civil society actors have played and important and influential role in ICANN, representing the interests of individuals, academics and non-commercial users. Panellists will introduce how civil society participates and contributes to ICANN, civil society's successes, and critically examine how the voice and knowledge of global civil society can be strengthened; what more can be done to further ICANN's mission and core values, particularly ensuring continued and expanded geographic and cultural diversity. There will be discussion about lessons civil society actors can learn from participation in ICANN to promote participation and contributions to other Internet governance processes.

Roundtable Speakers (provisional):

- Lousewies van der Laan, ICANN Board (Chair of the session)
- Sarah Kiden, African Regional At-Large Organization (AFRALO)
- Alan Greenberg, Chair At-Large Advisory Committee (ALAC)
- Satish Babu, Asian, Australasian and Pacific Islands Regional At-Large Organization (APRALO)
- Niels ten Oever, University of Amsterdam 
- Farzaneh Badii, Chair Non Commercial Stakeholders Group (NCSG) ICANN
- Ayden Férdeline, ICANN Generic Names Supporting Organization (GNSO) Council and NCSG
- Joan Kerr, Chair Not For Profit Operational Concerns Constituency (NPOC) ICANN (TBC)
- Tatiana Tropina, ICANN Generic Names Supporting Organization (GNSO) Council and NCSG
- Grace Mutung'u, Berkman Klein Center and KICTANet 


- Jean-Jacques Sahel, VP Stakeholder Engagement & Managing Director - Europe
- Adam Peake, ICANN Civil Society Engagement

 


Session Organizers
AP

Adam Peake

civil society engagement, ICANN
I'm responsible for ICANN's relations with civil society organizations, supporting non-commercial participation in ICANN's multi-stakeholder model. Before joining ICANN in December 2014, I worked for more than two decades as a researcher at the Center for Global Communications (GLOCOM... Read More →


Sunday December 17, 2017 15:00 - 16:30
Salle 2 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

15:00

World Economic Forum: An Open Dialogue for Collaboration in the Digital Economy and Society
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

As the digital ecosystem grows increasingly large and complex, there is a critical need to identify and align on the key factors shaping its evolution with the broader digital community. This session will seek to introduce the Forum’s platform approach and share opportunities for engaging with the work of the Forum in a variety of initiatives, seek input and feedback from the IGF community, and raise awareness on the importance of multi-stakeholder collaboration.

Key questions to be addressed include:

  • What are the key leverage points where collaboration is needed to strengthen the inclusion, trustworthiness and sustainability of the digital society?
  • How can the Forum work together with the IGF community more effectively to address shared priorities?
  • How can we accelerate the manner in which we discover and share key insights and learnings? 

Session Organizers
avatar for William Hoffman

William Hoffman

Project Lead, Platform Economy, AI, IoT and Trust, World Economic Forum
William Hoffman heads the World Economic Forum's initiatives on Data-Driven Development and the Global Agenda of the Information and Communications Technology sector. Comprised of a multi-stakeholder community of industry, civil society, governmental and academic leaders, this group works to collectively identify where ICT can positively impact some of the world's m... Read More →


Sunday December 17, 2017 15:00 - 16:30
Salle 14 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

15:00

Latin America in a Glimpse 2017: Gender, Politics and the Internet

Organization: Derechos Digitales

Title: Latin America in a Glimpse 2017: Gender, Politics and the Internet

Description:

On this event, women working in the intersection between gender politics and the internet will get together with other interested actors, from inside and outside the region, to discuss the main challenges that Latin America is facing regarding women rights in the internet. Issues like discrimination, gender violence online, online harrasment, social media's moderation policies, local legislations and how to create safe spaces on the internet will be adressed.

On this event we will also present the 4th edition of Latin America in a Glimpse report, focused on gender-related tech projects developed in the region during 2017.

This event is a partnership between Derechos Digitales and APC, with collaborations from different Latin American organizations.

 


Sunday December 17, 2017 15:00 - 18:00
Salle 13 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

15:00

Unpacking the Global Conference on CyberSpace 2017 - Charting a forward course

Unpacking the Global Conference on CyberSpace 2017 - Charting a forward course

Description:

The fifth iteration of the Global Conference on CyberSpace, the GCCS 2017 took place on November 23 and 24 in New Delhi, India. As perhaps the largest global conference on cybersecurity, it attracted varied participation across stakeholder groups. However, while there tends to be significant momentum leading up to an event like the GCCS, this often dissipates after the event, and potential learnings, synergies and opportunities for impact might be lost. 

This pre-event hopes to engage persons who are interested in the London process and the themes of GCCS 2017, and through this capture the substantive outcomes of the Conference by unpacking the GCCS 2017 Chair's Statement. Following this, we hope to provide space for collaborative efforts to further the goals of the GCCS 2017.

Schedule:

15.00 - 15.15:

  • Welcome and outlining purpose of the session.

  • Brief outline of the London process and the GCCS.

15.15 - 16.15:

  • Panel Discussion: Unpacking the Chair’s Statement from GCCS 2017. Recap of the Conference and its outcomes.

    • Discussants:

      • Lea Kaspar, Global Partners Digital

      • Marilia Maciel, Diplo Foundation

      • Olaf Kolkman, ISOC

      • Chinmayi Arun, Centre for Communication Governance at National Law University Delhi

      • Moderator: Daniela Schnidrig, Global Partners Digital

  • Structure for the session:

    • Intro by moderator (5 minutes)

    • Discussants interventions and remarks (20 minutes)

    • Q&A (20 minutes)

    • Final remarks by discussants (10)

    • Summary by moderator (5 minutes)

  • Key questions: 

    • Reflections and analysis of conference and its outcomes.

    • Reflections on outcome document. How does the 2017 statement build on the 2015 statement?

    • Civil society engagement in the process

    • How to best balance free expression, openness and security ­- what is the Indian perspective?

    • Roles and responsibilities (paragraph 32 of GCCS 2015 Chair’s Statement) does this reflect the current state of play and the multistakeholder model?

    • What is the purpose, structure and future of the global knowledge sharing platform? How do we engage with it?

     

16.15 - 16.45 - Tea/coffee break

16.45 - 17.45:

  • Panel Discussion: Charting a forward course: Learnings from the GCCS 2017. Capturing lessons learned and how to build on them for the next Conference.
    • Discussants:

      • Lillian Nalwoga, CIPESA

      • Matthew Shears, Global Partners Digital

      • Kaja Ciglic, Microsoft

      • Deborah Brown, APC

      • Moderator: Smitha Prasad, Centre for Communication Governance at National Law University Delhi

  • Structure for the session:

    • Intro by moderator (5 minutes)

    • Discussants interventions and remarks (15 to 20 minutes)

    • Q&A (20 minutes)

    • Final remarks by discussants (10)

    • Summary by moderator (5 minutes)

  • Key questions:

    • How do we ensure meaningful participation of all participants in future iterations of the conference?

    • How do we maximize discourse so that the sessions are more open and facilitate discussion/questions?

    • How do we ensure that the outcomes are the product of stakeholder consultation ­- what can we learn from GCCS 2017?

    • How do we build on prior GCCSs to maximize inclusion and discussion?

    • How do we ensure continuity over the period between 2017 and 2019?

17.45 - 18.00

  • Moderators to sum-up panels.



 


Session Organizers
avatar for Shuchita Thapar

Shuchita Thapar

Centre for Communication Governance


Sunday December 17, 2017 15:00 - 18:00
Salle 18 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

16:00

Data analysis to enhance global action to identify child victims of sexual abuse and exploitation

Organization: ECPAT International

Title: Data analysis to enhance global action to identify child victims of sexual abuse and exploitation

Description:

Child Sexual Abuse Material (CSAM) represents a significant global challenge for law enforcement and others. In recent years, increased national and international cooperation between law enforcement and across sectors has advanced efforts to identify children depicted in CSAM, and prevent further revictimisation. 

However, gaps in resourcing and cooperation, and the absence of clear indicators to describe victimisation through CSAM may hamper efforts and leave too many children unidentified. These children deserve a digital future, and their online rights must be protected. 

To address this, ECPAT International and INTERPOL are cooperating on the European Commission-funded project ‘International Child Sexual Exploitation Database (ICSE) Connectivity and Awareness Raising Enhancements – I-CARE’. An important outcome of I-CARE is analysis of CSAM data internationally registered in the ICSE Database at INTERPOL as a first step towards production of a set of indicators on CSAM, or the Global Imperative Indicator (GII). 

This pre-event is designed to: 
1. Present the study, including emerging themes and findings so far
2. Engage key stakeholders in discussion about the research
3. Discuss next steps for advocacy surrounding the GII 

Speakers:

Marie Laure - Head of Programme, Online Child Sexual Exploitation, ECPAT International
Amy Crocker - GII Project Manager, ECPAT International 
Hedwig de Jager - INTERPOL Crimes against Children Unit 

 


Session Organizers
avatar for Amy Crocker

Amy Crocker

Project Coordinator - GII Project, ECPAT International
My experience is in programme coordination, project management and capacity building to combat child sexual exploitation and abuse, including online. I have worked with law enforcement, civil society and the private sector in a number of multi-stakeholder settings around the world... Read More →


Sunday December 17, 2017 16:00 - 18:00
Salle 21+22 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

16:00

ISOC
Sunday December 17, 2017 16:00 - 18:00
Salle 3 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

16:00

Strengthening cooperation within the context of the IGF: Creating a roadmap for 2018

Organization: De Natris Consult

Title: Strengthening cooperation within the context of the IGF: Creating a roadmap for 2018

Description:

Strengthening cooperation in cyber security and cyber crime issues within the context of the IGF has been discussed within the Multistakeholder Advisory Group (MAG) as a potential Best Practice Forum topic for 2017. From these discussions the option was posed by the MAG to first focus on the topic from several angles at the upcoming IGF in Geneva and to distil recommendations on potential ways forward for the MAG to discuss in 2018. This IGF Day 0 session follows up on this request and invites all concerned organisations to work together on formulating recommendations on the way forward on this topic.

In an ideal world organisations working on solutions involving awareness raising, standard setting, regulation, enforcement, mitigation, ICT product security, etc. inform, cooperate and coordinate (with) each other, thus strengthening each other’s aims, effect and resolve. Unfortunately actual cooperation is not something that comes naturally to organisations (within different silos). This has many reasons, e.g. (perceived) competition, disparate interests, different outlooks, etc. or they simply never meet.

Several organisations involved in the IGF over the past decade have posed the question whether it is possible to work within the IGF context on complex issues surrounding the Internet and its governance, by cooperating in an ongoing fashion towards mutually supported solutions. However, before commonalities and shared interests can be identified, time passes and work has to be put in by all involved. Foremost to build trust. The body of work leading up to this Day 0 session aims at giving this discussion a headstart in 2018.

First by looking at current successful cross-organisation cooperation. By focusing on the reasons why these collaborations are successful and determining which situation(s) and/or organisation(s)allowed for success, lessons can be learned. The results of research carried out, are presented at the session and to the world at large.

It leads up to the goal of this session: to do the groundwork towards joint initiatives to strengthen cooperation within the context of the IGF. Organisations from around the globe are invited to participate and fill in a questionnaire, the answers to which form the basis of the discussion during this session. Organisations are invited to share their views on e.g. cooperation, establishing common goals, interests and challenges, whether the IGF could be a place to continue this debate and if so, what topics need to be discussed, what topic justifies a well-supported pilot, etc. The starting point will be the recommendations participating organisations agreed upon unanimously in workshop #153 ‘Let’s break down silos in cyber security and cyber crime’ (2016), https://www.nligf.nl/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/Report-workshop-153-Let27s-break-down-silos.pdf

This session strives to provide a conclusive roadmap on how to continue the topic of strengthened cooperation within the context of the IGF. Its outcomes are reported in the main session on enhanced cooperation at the IGF. The report, including the recommendations, is presented to the MAG in 2018.

 


Sunday December 17, 2017 16:00 - 18:00
Salle 6 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

16:30

Global Commission on the Stability of Cyberspace
"Building bridges over troubled waters"
The Global Commission on the Stability of Cyberspace (GCSC) 

During this session, members of the GCSC will talk about the Commission, its recently issued "Call to Protect the Public Core of the Internet", and the future of norms in guiding responsible state and non-state behaviour in cyberspace.

GCSC Speakers include: 
  • Vinton Cerf, Chief Internet Evangelist, Google (US)
  • Abdul-Hakeem Ajijola, Steering Committee Member of the OIC-CERT (NG)
  • Anriette Esterhuysen, Director of global policy and strategy, APC (ZA)
  • Marina Kaljurand, GCSC Chair and former Foreign Minister of Estonia (EE)
  • Olaf Kolkman, Chief Internet Technology Officer, ISOC (NL)
  • Wolfgang Kleinwächter, Professor Emeritus, University of Aarhus, former ICANN Board Member (DE)
  • Christopher Painter, former US Cyber Coordinator (US)
  • Marietje Schaake, Member of the European Parliament (NL)
  • Bill Woodcock, executive director of Packet Clearing House (US)

Other speakers include:
  • Ambassador Thomas Fitschen, Director for the United Nations,International Cyber Policy and Counter-Terrorism, Federal Foreign Office of Germany (DE)
  • Katherine Getao, ICT Secretary, Ministry of Information,Communications and Technology, Kenya (KE)

Attachments
: agenda, the GCSC Call to Protect the Public Core of the Internet, and the GCSC submission for the IGF-BPF Cybersecurity. 

The Commission brings together stakeholders from different communities to develop proposals for norms and policies to enhance the international security and stability of cyberspace. More information about the Commission and its members is available at https://cyberstability.org.

Session Organizers
AK

Alexander Klimburg

Director, The Hague Centre for Strategic Studies, Global Commission on the Stability of Cyberspace



Sunday December 17, 2017 16:30 - 18:00
Salle 14 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

16:30

The DNS and Emerging Identifiers (including DOA)

Organization: ICANN

Title: The DNS and Emerging Identifiers (including DOA)

Description:

This dynamic and participatory Roundtable will include a number of Experts brought to together to discuss emerging identifier technologies and how these may play a role in the evolution we see taking place in the Internet, not least in the proliferation of the Internet of Things (IOT). 

The Session will give participants an opportunity to learn about how these systems work and discuss whether they’re relevant to the identifier System ICANN help coordinate. The Session will also include an overview of Digital Object Architecture (DOA) including the governance of its use, in contrast to that of the DNS. 

The Session will be led by David Conrad (the CTO of ICANN) and, as noted, include experts in different Identifier Technologies.

 


Sunday December 17, 2017 16:30 - 18:00
Salle 2 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)

17:00

Mexico: Identifying best practices on cybersecurity through cooperation

Organization: Coordination of the National Digital Strategy, The Presidency, Mexico

Title: Mexico: Identifying best practices on cybersecurity through cooperation

Description:

During this event, members of the multistakeholder community in Mexico will share the milestones, challenges and opportunities found during the creation of the National Strategy on Cybersecurity, a project built during 2017 through workshops, meetings, public consultations and taking into account contributions sent from several organizations of the local and international community. The project also takes into account the BPF on Cybersecurity outcomes.

 


Sunday December 17, 2017 17:00 - 18:00
Salle 4 Centre International de Conférences Genève (CICG)
 
Monday, December 18
 

09:00

DC on Core Internet Values
Chair: Olivier Crépin-Leblond
Speaker: Vint Cerf
Speaker: Matthew Shears

The first part of the session (Agenda items 2 and 3) will discuss the DC Core Internet Values position paper and discuss proposals for the next year's activity of the Dynamic Coalition. The second part of the session (Agenda Item 4) will discuss the DC's own leadership structure and development

AGENDA

1. Welcome and Introduction

2. Presentation and discussion of the DC Core Internet Values position paper for IGF2017
https://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/content/dc-core-internet-values-discussion-paper-2017-focus-on-freedom-from-harm-dc-on-core-internet

3. Proposals for way forward
a. Annual review of Core Values
b. Core Values Observatory

4. DC CIV organisational matters
a. Leadership selection process
b. Resources

5. Next Steps

Session Organizers
avatar for Olivier MJ Crepin-Leblond

Olivier MJ Crepin-Leblond

Chair, EURALO
More info about me on http://www.gih.com/ocl.html


Monday December 18, 2017 09:00 - 10:00
Room XXII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

09:00

China’s Internet Policy to Shape the Digital Future (OF15)
The Chinese government places high value on IT application and development, and is devoted to promoting digital economy development and sharing digital dividends. China has enacted a series of policies, laws and regulations to facilitate healthy and rapid development of digital economy, and expects to improve people's livelihood and benefit mankind through the Internet. 

China is vigorously implementing the national strategies for cyber development, IT application, big data and the “Internet Plus” action plan. It has introduced the 13th Five-Year Plan of National IT Development and the 13th Five-Year Plan of E-commerce Development to propel the integration of digital and real economies.

China advocates the principle of cooperation and shared benefits, and is committed to promoting digital economy globally and providing impetus for the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The Wuzhen Report on World Internet Development released at the World Internet Conference emphasized open development of digital economy. The Belt and Road Forum for International Cooperation proposed to pursue innovation-driven development and build a digital silk road. The latest International Strategy of Cooperation on Cyberspace calls for openness and cooperation, and promotes the building of a community of shared future in cyberspace.

The proposed Open Forum intends to invite speakers from Chinese cyberspace authorities, world-known Internet businesses, research institutes, and think tanks. It aims to act as a platform for introducing China’s achievements in digital economy and the development of relevant policies, laws and regulations, sharing best practices and advanced experience, and exploring with other countries how Internet can widely spread digital dividends and better benefit people of all countries.
Tag 1: Digital Economy
Tag 2: Rule of Law
Tag 3: Online Applications
Name(s) of Speaker(s):
CAC officials;
Experts from Chinese Academy of Cybersecurity Studies;
Delegate from Tecent;
Delegate from Alibaba;
Delegate from Baidu;
Delegate from Taihe Global Institute;

Name of Online Moderator: WANG Jianchao, Deputy Director General of CAC
Background Paper:
Past IGF Participation: Yes
Report Link: http://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/index.php?q=filedepot_download/4115/311
Name: Ms. Bin Bin Wei
Organizational Affiliation: Cyberspace Administration of China
 

Session Organizers

Monday December 18, 2017 09:00 - 10:00
Room XXIII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

09:00

Seed Alliance & gender inclusion: Towards greater female leadership in Internet (OF19)
The Seed Alliance is a grants and awards program that seeks to promote Internet Development in the Global South supporting a variety of stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean, Asia Pacific and Africa. It is a joint initiative by the Regional Internet Registries AFRINIC, APNIC and LACNIC, Internet Society, IDRC and the Swedish Cooperation Agency SIDA. 
Several of the initiatives supported by the regional programs that the RIRs support (respectively FIRE Africa, ISIF Asia and FRIDA) are led by women, have many women participating in their project teams or focus on gender related issues. These solutions contribute to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, across several targets..
The Seed Alliance is exploring for its 2018-2019 grant cycle, a greater emphasis on gender inclusion and leadership, and part of that should translate into how funding is allocated and how many women-led initiatives are supported. This Public Forum will seek views on how to integrate gender inclusion and seek insights on what Internet-related technical issues require investment across the Global South. 
The forum will also look at challenges faced by women-led social enterprises and startups in the developing countries in networking, capacity building, and growing their projects, and ways to solve those challenges. Participants at the forum are expected to help identify opportunities available. 
The session will start by an overview of what the Seed Alliance programs have done during the last few years (the report linked references Seed Alliance activities for the 2012-12015 period). FIRE (Africa), FRIDA (Latin America and the Caribbean) and ISIF Asia (Asia Pacific) will share with the audience what they have done to promote female-led innovation and entrepreneurship within their service regions.
The deliverable of the workshop will seek to find solutions that link to the Sustainable development goals of ending poverty in all it’s form everywhere, and also promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work. 


Publicity
=======
The Public forum will be promoted at the In the Seed Alliance Booth at the IGF.
Social Media (Facebook and Twitter) of the three Seed Alliance program handles, which are
ISIF Asia: https://twitter.com/ISIF_Asia, https://www.facebook.com/ISIF.asia 
FIRE Africa: https://twitter.com/fireafrica, https://www.facebook.com/fireafrinic 
FRIDA: https://twitter.com/programafrida, https://www.facebook.com/FondoRegionalFRIDA/
Tag 1: Internet & ICTs for the Sustainable Development Goals
Tag 2: Gender Issues
Tag 3: Inclusive Societies

Name(s) of Speaker(s)
Vymala Thuron, Technical Community, AFRINIC
Duncan Macintosh, Technical Community, APNIC Foundation
Carolina Caeiro, Technical Community, LACNIC
Name of Online Moderator: Vymala Thuron, Head External Relations, AFRINIC
Background Paper: background-paper.pdf
Past IGF Participation: Yes
Report Link: https://www.intgovforum.org/cms/wks2015/index.php/proposal/view_public/219

Name: Vymala Thuron,
Organizational Affiliation: AFRINIC
 

Session Organizers
avatar for Sylvia Cadena

Sylvia Cadena

Head of Programs / ISIF Asia coordinator, APNIC Foundation
Internet development | Capacity building | Funding for innovation / ISIF Asia grants and awards


Monday December 18, 2017 09:00 - 10:00
Room XXVI - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

09:00

Tackling gender divides: ICT and women’s economic empowerment (WS37)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Sophie Tomlinson
Proposer's Organization: ICC BASIS
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Timea Suto
Co-Proposer's Organization: ICC BASIS
Co-Organizers:
Ms Reema Nanavaty, Civil Society, Self Employed Women's Association (SEWA) India
Ms Towela Nyirenda, Inter-governmental Organization, NEPAD, African Union
Ms Sophie Tomlinson, Private sector, ICC BASIS


Session Format: Other - 90 Min
Format description: The format will be a “Campfire Session”. The goal of a campfire session is to create an open forum in which the attendees generate the majority of the discussion and knowledge sharing. The session will open with speakers/experts interventions. For the remainder of the session, the speakers become facilitators, inviting comments and questions from those around the room and letting the audience dictate the ultimate direction of the conversation. Campfire sessions allow attendees to drive their own learning, listen to multiple perspectives on the same issue, and share experiences with individuals throughout the room.

Proposer:
Country: France
Stakeholder Group: Private Sector

Co-Proposer:
Country: France
Stakeholder Group: Private Sector

Speaker: Ambassador Tobias Feakin, Government of Australia
Speaker: Reema Nanavaty SEWA
Speaker: Souhila Amazouz, African Union NEPAD
Speaker: Kate Doyle, Promundo 
Speaker: Asma Ennafer, Orange
Speaker: Will Hudson, Google
Speaker: Joyce Dogniez, ISOC



Content of the Session:
Internet Governance issue:
This workshop will explore the complex relationship between ICT and women’s economic empowerment and evaluate the contingent probing factors which are posing challenges to women being truly empowered by ICT. The goal is to illustrate how different stakeholders contribute to supporting women’s economic empowerment through ICT and survey opportunities and address challenges faced in developed and developing countries.

Session format:
The format will be a “Campfire Session”. The goal of a campfire session is to create an open forum in which the attendees generate the majority of the discussion and knowledge sharing. The session will open with speakers/experts interventions. For the remainder of the session, the speakers become facilitators, inviting comments and questions from those around the room and letting the audience dictate the ultimate direction of the conversation. Campfire sessions allow attendees to drive their own learning, listen to multiple perspectives on the same issue, and share experiences with individuals throughout the room.

The purpose of this workshop is to survey experiences and generate best practices on how stakeholders can tackle gender divides and boost the use of ICT to promote the empowerment of women. The campfire session format will facilitate this goal by enabling knowledge exchanges through an informal learning environment. Participants will be encouraged ahead of time via social media to bring questions, case examples and subject matter theories of their own to share with the group.

Agenda:
Although discussion and participants contributions will ultimately drive the agenda, the following will be used to guide conversation:
• The session will start with a short video of a case study example of how an ICT application can be used to support women’s economic empowerment (for example a mobile application for rural women entrepreneurs in India which has automated the supply chain process, allowing women to sell farm produce within their local communities more efficiently, to reduce travel time and generate more business opportunities). As an ice-breaker to help participants feel engaged and comfortable in the group, the moderator will ask the audience questions about the case study video by asking for a show of hands. The organisers will explore providing paper and pens with questions for the participants so they have time to reflect on answers. (15 minutes)
• Experts representing different stakeholder groups (business, civil society, technical community and government) will be invited to explain how ICT supports women’s empowerment and the role they play in initiatives which seek to empower women through ICT. Speakers will be encouraged to use concrete examples (30 minutes)
• Participants will share ideas on the probing factors which are posing challenges to women being truly empowered by ICT (for example: online abuse, socio-economic and cultural factors, role of family members, education and skills etc.) and suggest economic, social, technical and governance policy considerations. Speakers will become facilitators, inviting responses to comments and questions from those around the room and letting the audience dictate the ultimate direction of the conversation. The moderator will manage the discussion to ensure diverse interventions in person and remotely. (40 minutes).
• Moderator wrap up and summarize main take a ways (5 minutes)


Relevance of the Session:
This workshop will be directly related to the IGF 2017 theme as it will provide an important discussion on how the ICT ecosystem can support sustainable development (focus drawn to SDG 5) and highlight the ways in which stakeholders can work together to support women’s digital futures and overcome challenges facing women to become truly empowered by ICT.

The issue provides a timely link to Internet governance more broadly as the United Nations 2030 development agenda reflects the growing understanding that ICTs can be powerful instruments for advancing economic and social development through the creation of new types of economic activity, employment opportunities, enhancements in health-care and education and the enrichment of participation and advocacy within society. The WSIS+10 outcome document also recognizes the potential of ICTs as tools for promoting gender equality and Goal 5 of the UN sustainable development goals includes a target to “Enhance the use of enabling technology, in particular ICT, to promote the empowerment of women”.The workshop will provide an opportunity for IGF participants to share ideas on how to reach these goals.


Tag 1: Access and Diversity
Tag 2: Empowerment
Tag 3: Gender Issues

Interventions:
Speakers have been chosen to ensure geographic, gender, sector, and stakeholder group diversity. Each speaker will bring a unique perspective and experience to opportunities and challenges faced.

Moderator

-         Elizabeth Thomas-Raynaud, ICC BASIS

Speakers

-         Souhila Amazouz, African Union

-         Kate Doyle, Promundo

-         Asma Ennafer, Orange

-         Joyce Dogniez, ISOC

-         Ambassador Tobias Feakin, Government of Australia

-         Reema Nanavaty, SEWA

Online Moderator

-         Müge Haseki, University of Pennsylvania

Rapporteur

-         Sheetal Kumar, Global Partners Digital

 

All speakers will be given the opportunity to share short interventions on the topics discussed and will be encouraged to participate in discussion with participants.


Diversity:
Each stakeholder group will be represented (civil society, business, technical community and government) and speakers will represent different geographies and cultures.

Co-organizers and speakers will include representatives from developing countries (for example NEPAD and SEWA). Co-organizers bring the unique perspectives of a trade union for self-employed women workers (SEWA) and an organization that has experience facilitating and coordinating the development of programmes in Africa (NEPAD).

Efforts will be made to introduce new perspectives in the dialogue such as development practitioners which have not been heard in Internet governance discussions (for example Promundo and SEWA).

Gender balance has been encouraged through speaker choices and each speaker will bring unique expertise and experience to the topics discussed. Efforts have been made to ensure that men are represented in this discussion as they have a role to play in women’s economic empowerment.

Special attention will be made throughout the planning of the session to ensure diverse interventions from workshop participants can be facilitated by working closely with the remote moderator in the planning of the session.

Organisers will encourage remote participation by promoting the workshop and subject area on social media in the run up to the IGF and will explore facilitating interventions from remote hubs.

The remote moderator will be a youth participant and organizers will encourage youth participation. 

Onsite Moderator: Elizabeth Thomas-Raynaud, ICC BASIS 
Online Moderator: Youth Ambassador
Rapporteur: Sheetal Kumar, Global Partners Digital 

Online Participation:
The remote moderator will be involved throughout the workshop planning phase in an advisory role. Organizers have identified a youth online moderator for this role to provide a substantive opportunity for an IGF youth participant. The remote moderator will represent the technical community dotAsia and will be invited to assist in bringing youth participants into the discussion.

The Moderator will frequently communicate with the remote moderator thr

...

Session Organizers
avatar for Sophie Tomlinson

Sophie Tomlinson

Assistant Policy Manager, ICC BASIS
Sophie Tomlinson is the Assistant Policy Manager for the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) Commission on the Digital Economy and Business Action to Support the Information Society (BASIS) initiative. In that capacity, she manages ICC's policy development from the global business... Read More →


Monday December 18, 2017 09:00 - 10:30
Room XXI - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

09:00

NRIs Collaborative Session: European national perspectives on securing critical information infrastructure

 Co-proposers/co-organizers:

  • Albania IGF
  • Dutch IGF 
  • Dutch Youth IGF
  • Estonia IGF
  • Georgia IGF
  • German IGF
  • Norway IGF
  • SEEDIG 
  • Switzerland IGF
  • UK-IGF
  • Ukrainian IGF
  • EuroDIG the regional forum will be the facilitator of this session, by bringing together independent NRIs from the region to discuss and exchange. We consider the preparatory process as an integral part of the discussion during the session.

Session title  
European national perspectives on securing critical information infrastructure (To agree on cybersecurity as topic for discussion is the result of a consultation process as it was agreed during the NRI Assembly taking place at EuroDIG in Tallinn in June 2017.)

Session format and timing

The session will be 90 minutes long in total. It will be a co-moderated discussion among national security experts and the audience. Speakers will be invited to provide their perspective on the national approach and co-moderators will constantly engage with the audience (onsite and online); not only via an open mic but also by using interactive tools. The session will be concluded by the key messages of the discussion, to be delivered by rapporteurs.

Content of the session
Cybersecurity in all of its facets has consistently topped the agendas of the NRIs in Europe for the past two years. This was the outcome of a review of hot topics among NRIs in Europe. (See the compilation of hot topics discussed in Europe).

During the session, the co-organizers will  provide an overview of national subtopics as they have been discussed within Europe, find out where the commonalities lie and where are the differences, and suggest the ways to bridge divergences in approaches.

We will discuss the following questions:  

  1. Defining what are the critical assets to be secured at the national level, and what are the methodologies to prevent them?
  2. What are the local challenges?
  3. How to build trust between all stakeholders?
  4. How can/do the National Internet Governance Initiatives facilitate and support collaborative, multistakeholder solutions to address these local challenges?

Speakers

  • Marina Kaljurand, Chair of the Global Commission on the Stability of Cyberspace (GCSC) and former Foreign Minister of Estonia
  • Nata Goderdzishvili, Ministry of Justice of Georgia, Data Exchange Agency, senior consultant in e-government and cyber security, Georgia IGF
  • Nina Leemhuis Jansen, Dutch Ministry of Justice
  • Vanessa Berning, Wilma Westenberg (Netherlands Youth IGF)
  • Isabel Skierka, Digital Society Institute at ESMT Berlin and Co-Chair IGF Germany [remote]
  • David Rüfenacht, MELANI, Reporting and Analysis Centre for Information Assurance, Switzerland
  • Ørnulf Storm, Norwegian Communications Authority
  • Su Sonia Herring, Civil Society, SEEDIG Executive Committee, Turkey
  • Nick Wenban-Smith, UK IGF

Relevance of the issue
It has become conventional wisdom that cybersecurity is a global problem that requires a global response. In reality, however, there are differences in approaches to the protection of critical infrastructure at the local and regional levels, especially with regard to the role of the government, the need for regulatory intervention, and the definition and scope of what constitutes critical infrastructure, to name but a few.

The compilation of hot topics clearly shows the diversity of cybersecurity-related issues discussed within one region but Europe is not unified in terms of the issues, resources and possible solutions and we can find different UN regional Groups / WEOG and Non-WEOG (developing economies) in this region. However with more than 20 active and independent European Internet Governance Initiatives, we would like to showcase the existing substantive diversity on how to approach the issue of cybersecurity within the European region. Each NRI is of a multistakeholder nature and this will be reflected in the Org Team as well as in the session.

>>Find more information about different national perspectives further below under "Additional Background"

Onsite moderator(s)

Tatiana Tropina, EuroDIG cybersecurity Subject Matter Expert Cyber (SME)
Vladimir Radunovic, DiploFoundation

Online moderator
Michael Oghia, YOUthDIG cybersecurity Focal Point

Rapporteur
Nick Wenban-Smith, UK IGF 

Link with the Sustainable Development Goals: (8), 9, 11


Connecting with intersessional groups:
Best Practice Forum Cybersecurity Our aim is to add a national perspective to the expert discussion in the BPF and not to repeat or duplicate other sessions.

Reference document link


ADDITIONAL BACKGROUND
 
Thematic input from the Netherlands:
we have a lot of discussion in the Netherlands, after years of 'ignoring' the serious threats, cyber security is top of mind now, but there is a risk of too  much top-down approach and control. When cyber threats such as IOT botnets become manifest, the common reflex is to start initiatives to deal with the situation at hand. But as it turns out a generic, bottom-up approach towards threat mitigation is much more effective. Continue reading...

Thematic input from Georgia:
We are one of the few countries where cyber security exceeds ICT development. While in the beginning eGovernment and Information society were key enablers for strengthening state efforts in cyber domain, nowadays cyber security attracts high political and societal attention.  Being in the 8th place in ITU Global Cyber Security Index implies that Georgia is recognized in the world as one of the most advanced countries in terms of cybersecurity. No less important, Georgia occupies the 2nd place in National Cyber Security Index in 2017. Continue reading...

Thematic input from Germany: Cybersecurity has become a highly political issue in Germany. The public debate about defensive and offensive cybersecurity capabilities highlights tensions between different dimensions of cybersecurity: the security of information technology, critical infrastructure, and individual users on the one hand, and national security on the other. Two events have fuelled the rise of cybersecurity to the top of the political agenda and to the center of public debate in Germany: the Snowden revelations in 2013 and the cyber attack against the German parliament (Bundestag) in 2015. Today, the government’s expansion of offensive hacking capabilities is cause for growing public debate about the government’s role in cybersecurity. Continue reading...

Thematic input from Albania: Albania ranks among the countries where the development of telecommunications, internet access and computerization of society is progressing very quickly. Increasing the use of communication is an added value in the country's economic and social development, but at the same time it exposes it to the dangers of cybernetic nature with state and non-state actors. The last years Albanian Government has done several very important steps related Cybersecurity by: Continue reading...


Thematic input from UK
: Report from the UK IGF 2017

Thematic input from SEEDIG: One of the six sessions of SEEDIG 2017 annual meeting focused on cybersecurity challenges and opportunities in the region. The most prominent answers to the onsite survey asking, “What are cybersecurity priorities and what should they be?” were:

  • Ignorance
  • Identity theft
  • Privacy
  • Facebook
  • Credit card frauds
  • Governments

Other questions discussed included: Is cybersecurity on national agendas?  Are there implementable action plans and multistakeholder processes? What is the level of regional cooperation (and why is it low)? Continue reading...

Thematic input from Norway: National and sectorial response centers: The Norwegian Computer Emergency Response Team (NorCERT) in the National Security Authority has the ability to prevent, detect and analyze data related to serious incidents on the Internet. NorCERT works closely with other countries and similar services in international organizations. To improve society’s ability to detect, alert and handle serious ICT incidents, in addition to NorCERT’s overall role, multiple sectoral response teams have recently been established in Norway. This is in conjunction with the strategies aligned in the Cyber Security Strategy for Norway (2012) Continue reading...

...

Session Organizers

Monday December 18, 2017 09:00 - 10:30
Room XXIV - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

09:00

E-commerce: Good or bad for development? (WS151)


ORGANIZERS: Public Citizen, South Centre and TWN

Session Format: Round Table - 90 Min

Trade agreements are shaping the rules that would shape our digital future. Recent reports by the UNCTAD demonstrated that a majority of developing countries do not have an adequate legal structure regarding digital trade, Internet governance, or cyber-security. There are many unknowns regarding the technological advances ahead, and therefore the digital economy. Recognizing the uncertainty in the policy-making process, this panel aims to contribute to debates on trade, internet and development, by placing development priorities at center of e-commerce discussions and policymaker’s considerations.

The 11th Ministerial Meeting (MC11) of the World Trade Organization (WTO) has just concluded in Buenos Aires without any substantive outcome. E-commerce was one the hottest topic in the Ministerial discussions. The WTO rulemaking has long been promoted as the revolution that developing countries have been waiting for that would promote innovation, provide many opportunities to Micro and Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (MSMEs) and contribute to development. Somehow, there seems to be several missing links in this thinking. ‘What kind of rules’ is not being asked?

Developing countries have been clear that their concerns in this arena include increased access to energy, internet, and other information and communication technologies; closing the digital divide; increased infrastructure for logistics including transportation and postal systems; legal and regulatory frameworks; access to finance; and capacity building in technologies to help them prepare to benefit from e-commerce. But these issues are generally not reflected in the proposals that have been submitted, which are far more likely to result in binding and enforceable rules.

This roundtable will provide an overview of the WTO rulesmaking system, update participants on the MC11, and focus on the development aspects of e-commerce and discuss those questions that haven’t been asked:

• What are the proposed E-commerce rules that is sought to be negotiated in various fora- FTAs and WTO?
• What are the implications of proposed E-Commerce rules for most Developing Countries?
• How ready are developing countries in engaging in trade online? Are small and medium-sized enterprises able to easily surpass all the hurdles of offline business and gain export markets easily via e-commerce?
• What are the implications of these E-Commerce rules on internet governance issues?
• Will there be rules to mandate technology transfer to developing countries in order to bridge the digital divide? Or rules that prohibit such transfer?
• What are the challenges developing countries face regarding e-commerce and more pertinently since the WTO is about cross-border trade, cross-border e-commerce?
• Are new WTO rules somehow going to melt away the development challenges faced in developing countries?

This first-of-its kind round-table discussion features speakers representing trade expertise from both government, intergovernemental organizations, CSOs and industry. The event is intended to provide attendees with multiple perspectives from trade delegates, as well as CSO and industry, focusing on the development aspects of the current digital trade agenda.  Thus, this round-table will build a bridge between trade and internet governance worlds. The format will provide an excellent opportunity for active, in-depth discussion and interaction. 

Speakers:
This round-table brings together a range of trade delegates, scholars and CSO experts with a genuine expertise and sensitivity for the concerns of the global South, together.

  • Michael Wamai, Uganda Permanent Mission, Government, Uganda
  • Fernando Rosales, Bolivia Permanent Mission, Government, Bolivia
  • Aileen Kwa, South Centre, Intergovernmental Organization
  • David Snead, i2coalition, Business, United States
  • Pablo Viollier, Derechos Digitales, CSO, Chile
  • Parminder Sigh, Just Net Coalition, CSO, India

Onsite Moderator: 
Sanya Smith Reid (TWN)
Online Moderator:
Francisco Vera Hott (Privacy international) 


Discussion:
The first part of the panel (around 45 minutes) will be dedicated to an interactive roundtable during which the panelists will be asked to provide concise answers (i.e. less than 5-minutes-long) to the questions asked by the moderator. Furthermore, panelists will have the possibility to reply to their peers' statements. Subsequently, the panelists will engage in an open and dynamic debate, during which the audience will play a key role asking questions, providing inputs and steering the discussion. The attendees and the remote participants will be allowed to ask questions during the workshop, but their participation and inputs will be particularly encouraged during the second part of the session.


Session Organizers
avatar for Burcu Kilic

Burcu Kilic

Legal and Policy Director, Public Citizen


Monday December 18, 2017 09:00 - 10:30
Room IX - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

09:00

What digital future for vulnerable people? (WS157)

Proposer's Name: Mr. Enrico Calandro
Proposer's Organization: Research ICT Africa
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Chenai Chair
Co-Proposer's Organization: Research ICT Africa
Co-Organizers:
Ms., Anri, VAN DER SPUY, Private Sector, Independent Consultant


Session Format: Debate - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: South Africa
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Co-Proposer:
Country: South Africa
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speaker: Wakabi Wairagala (Director at CIPESA)
Speaker: Alexandrine Pirlot de Corbion (Advocacy Officer, Privacy International)
Speaker: Ursula Wynhoven (ITU Representative to the United Nations in New York)
Speaker: Yatanar Htun (Director at Myanmar ICT Development Organisation)


Content of the Session:
Despite the technological advancement and the reduction of the digital divide in many African countries, the increased level of connectedness brings about new challenges for the vulnerable of society. Not only a considerable portion of the population in Africa is still disconnected or is connected to an expensive and poor quality network, but also their rights online such as freedom of expression, privacy and security, might be totally neglected, making them even more vulnerable in the digital space. Therefore, a new divide is emerging between those who are aware of their digital rights (including how they are regulated in their jurisdictions and how to protect themselves against digital rights violation) and those who are unware of what their digital rights are and do not have resources – skills, means and capabilities - to enforce these. We refer to this phenomenon as “digital rights divide”.

The proposed debate is about the “digital rights divide” and discussants are invited to share their views on what digital future is expected for vulnerable people. The focus of the debate is on Africa and research findings from the Beyond access surveys conducted by Research ICT Africa in 2017 in selected African countries will be shared.

Specifically, the debate seeks to answer to the following questions:
1) Who are the vulnerable of society? 2) What is their level of access to ICT? 3) What type of access to they have to ICT? 4) Do they contribute to "shaping their digital future"? How? 5) Are they aware of their digital rights? 6) If so, how do they enforce their rights (or defend themselves) from threats on digital rights violation? 7)Do different stakeholders engage with them and how?

The debate has the following intended agenda:

- Brief introduction on the topic of the debate and on the discussants
- Presentation on vulnerability and digital rights, based on the Research ICT Africa Beyond Access surveys conducted in 2017 in selected Africa countries
- Debate on research findings moderated by an expert on digital rights in Africa;
- Open microphone for online and offline interventions and questions from the public;
- Answers from the discussion;
- Wrap up and take aways.

Relevance of the Session:
The debate is a contribution towards the achievement of the 10th Global Goal for Sustainable Development which aims at “Reducing inequality within and among countries”. In this instance our focus being on digital rights inequality. The debate on the digital future for vulnerable people will tackle cyber policy and regulation that might not be communicated in a relevant way for vulnerable groups of society as these people not only are currently excluded from any debate on digital rights, but also because they might be unaware on how – or not have the resources - to defend themselves from digital rights violation. Therefore, the debate will seek to provide recommendations towards progressively achieving greater equality on digital rights awareness and enforcement. Issues on how to ensure enhanced representation and voice for vulnerable people in decision-making of digital rights in order to deliver more effective, credible, accountable and legitimate cyber-policies will also be discussed.

Tag 1: Digital Rights
Tag 2: Digital Future
Tag 3: Internet Inclusion

Interventions:
The speakers to the panel belong to different stakeholders groups – civil society, academia, technical community, and private sector. In this way, different perspectives on how digital rights enforcement, and fighting against digital rights violation, is addressed by different stakeholders groups. The discussant, based on their experience, will be challenged to discuss issues on digital rights violation within vulnerable groups, and how their expertise can contribute towards bridging the “digital rights divide”.

Diversity:
Diversity is taken into account in the selection of discussants, moderators, and organisers. Gender balance is respected and preference is given to women in the panel. Discussants work in developing countries and belong to different stakeholders groups.

Onsite Moderator: Enrico Calandro
Online Moderator: Anri Van Der Spuy
Rapporteur: Yolanda Mlonzi

Online Participation:
In order to ensure equal offline and online participation, online attendees will have their own interventions and questions queue and microphone, which will rotate equally with the microphone in the room. The moderator of the debate in the room will work closely with the online moderator in order to balance online and offline participation during the debate. The remote moderator, who has been selected based on her expertise in communications, journalism, new media and ICT policy, will be trained on how to engage the online community to participate to the debate and on how to feed the offline debate with online contributions. On the other hand, the moderator in the room will be trained on how to alternate offline contributions and online contributions from the remote public. The moderator of the debate in the room and the online moderator will meet before the debate to organise modalities of interventions of the offline and online public.
Last but not least, in order to engage more and new participants in the session, remote hubs for participation in the session will be organised in the study's target countries - i.e. South Africa, Rwanda, Tanzania, Mozambique, Ghana, Nigeria, and Kenya. The organisers will identify iHubs, Incubators or other ICT centres who will set up remote hubs and invite local participants to remotely participate to the discussion.

Discussion facilitation:
The moderators (offline and online) supported by the workshop organisers, will involve discussants and the public in the debate, and will facilitate the discussion on the topic of the workshop. Specifically, in order to optimise the time and to assure fair participation of both online and offline participants, the debate will unfold in the following way:

1) The moderator will introduce the discussants to the offline and online public and will briefly introduce the topic of the debate: 3 minutes

2) The moderator will then invite a researcher from Research ICT Africa to present findings from the Beyond Access surveys on how vulnerable people use ICT and on their awareness on issues related to digital rights: 10 minutes.

3) Afterwards, the moderator will invite discussants to comment on the research results and to share their own experience on digital rights and vulnerable people: 5 discussants, 5 minutes each = 25 minutes.

4) After all discussants have expressed their opinions, the moderator will invite the offline public and the online public to make interventions or to ask specific questions. A maximum of 3 offline interventions/questions and 3 online interventions/questions will be placed in a queue and will have the microphone: 12 minutes.

5) Questions will be answered, and additional comments will be made by the discussants: 15 minutes.

6) The moderators will open up the microphones to a second round of online and offline interventions/questions: 12 minutes.

7) The debate will end with a final round of answers and additional comments by the discussants: 10 minutes.

8) The moderator will wrap up and close the debate: 3 minutes.

TOTAL: 90 minutes.

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: Yes
Link to Report: http://www.intgovforum.org/cms/wks2014/index.php/proposal/view_public/118

Additional Speakers: 

Jorge Vargas (Head of Strategic Partnerships - LATAM, Wikimedia Foundation)
Elloani Hickok (Co-Director, Centre for Internet & Society)

Agenda: 

Suggested Agenda (90 minutes):
a. Introduction to the workshop topic by Anri Van Der Spuy, workshop co-organizer

b. Presentation of the RIA Beyond Access research (indicators on digital rights awareness) by Chenai Chair (5 minutes)

c. Panelist remarks (5 minutes each: 20 minute in total)

d. Open Discussion (35 minutes), facilitated by on-side moderator, including comments and questions from remote participants

e.  Closing remarks from panelists (5 minutes each: 20 minutes in total)

f.  Wrap-up of the discussion (10 minutes)

...

Session Organizers
avatar for Enrico Calandro

Enrico Calandro

Research manager, Research ICT Africa
Enrico Calandro (Ph.D.) is a research manager at Research ICT Africa, an ICT think tank based in Cape Town. Over the last eight years, Enrico has been exploring the relationship between digital access and development, and his research has been published on peer-review journals and... Read More →


Monday December 18, 2017 09:00 - 10:30
Room XXVII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

09:00

Data governance and policy: Developing a curriculum (WS186)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Roxana Radu
Proposer's Organization: Geneva Internet Platform
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Tereza Horejsova
Co-Proposer's Organization: Geneva Internet Platform
Co-Organizers:
Mr,Francois,GREY,Academia,University of Geneva


Session Format: Round Table - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: Switzerland
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Co-Proposer:
Country: Switzerland
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speakers:

Alberto Pace, Head of Storage at CERN
Sophie Huber,
Director of the Center for continuing and distance education, UNIGE

Phillippa Biggs, Coordinator, Broadband Commission for Digital Development, ITU

Pierre Mirlesse, Vice president for Hewlett Packard Enterprise’s Public Sector business in the EMEA region
Heather Leson,
Data Literacy Lead, Policy, Strategy and Knowledge, IFRC


Moderator: Katharina Hoene,
Research Associate Diplomacy and Global Governance, DiploFoundation

Online moderator: Roxana Radu, Programme Manager, Geneva Internet Platform and DiploFoundation

Content of the Session:
Data is at the core of modern society, from our digital footprint via e-mail and social media, through to big data analytics. Artificial intelligence further increases the power and relevance of data. Cross-border data flows are challenged by policy decisions, in a similar way as the movement of goods, services, and people across borders. Data appears in two major realms. First, data is a tool used to develop better policies on health, trade, migration, and climate, to name just few relevant areas. Second, data is a topic of diplomatic negotiations addressing privacy, security, digital trade, and other important issues.

Data governance and policy requires new skills and techniques. The demand for data policy experts is not being met by supply. While there are training and academic courses for data scientists, there are no courses for data policy specialists.

The workshop will discuss a curriculum that should be used for capacity development, training, and academic activities to improve policy-making. It will build, among others, on DiploFoundation’s experience in Internet governance capacity development and studies on digital capacity development. More specifically, the workshop will be a follow-up to discussions conducted in Geneva during 2017, including a workshop held during WSIS Forum 2017.

The session will focus on policy, legal, human rights, and economic skills and knowledge. The outputs from the discussion will form the basis for a Report on Curriculum for Data Governance and Policy which will be finalised in 2018. This curriculum will offer practical support for addressing the needs of specialists worldwide in the highly relevant field of data governance and policy. 

Relevance of the Session:
The session will deal primarily with data, a term that is tackled from several Internet governance angles, including privacy, security, infrastructure, and content policy - to name but a few.

With regards to the main theme, given that data is at the core of modern society and its digital future, dealing with data from different standpoints is crucial to ensure that it is used meaningfully as a tool, and addressed adequately in negotiations on the subject. Capacity development is an important starting point to dealing with data.

Tag 1: Data
Tag 2: Capacity Building
Tag 3: International Geneva

Interventions:
The session will tap into the expertise of the speakers, to tackle data from the technology, economic, and policy perspectives. The speakers will provide viewpoints to open the discussion (5-minute interventions), followed by a moderated discussion with participants. 

Diversity:
The session will aim to bring in a diversity of voices and viewpoints. In addition to the confirmed speakers listed above, the organisers will invite other speakers that will bring more diversity to the session (in terms of stakeholder group, region, gender). These include representatives from the African Union, the Swiss National Science Foundation, and academic institutions from different regions.

While the speakers will ensure a diversity of views at the start of the session, for the rest of the session, the moderator will make sure to engage as many participants as possible, thus ensuring that multiple policy perspectives (legal, human rights, economic, etc.) are shared during the discussions.

Onsite Moderator: Katharina Hoene
Online Moderator: Roxana Radu
Rapporteur: Barbara Rosen Jacobson

Online Participation:
Online participation will include monitoring and input of social media feeds by the online moderator. True participation will be ensured for online discussion participants through equal opportunity to intervene using strategies for instant communication between the panel moderator and online participant moderators, to overcome the frequent lag in online input, which can cause online input to be out of sync (too late) with the discussion. Online participants will speak to the room when possible, with a backup for text input with online moderator representation to the room when necessary and appropriate. Online participant input will be respected, i.e., it will not be summarised or edited by the online moderator, but presented on equal footing to onsite participation. Online participants will follow the same rules for timing and rotation of input.

Moderators for online participation are trained for this task, and well-versed in the topic.

Discussion facilitation:
The session will start with a 5-minute intervention from the speakers, followed by a moderated discussion with the participants (onsite and online). They will interact with the speakers on the subject and share their views, experiences, and suggestions.

Mics will be rotated among stakeholder queues to ensure equal opportunity for different stakeholder groups, as well as online and onsite participants.

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: Yes
Link to Report: http://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/content/igf-2016-day-4-room-7-ws-149-finding-ways-to-build-confidence-in-stakeholder-legitimacy

Agenda: 

The workshop will start with 5-min introductory remarks from the speakers on building a data governance curriculum. An experienced moderator will then open the floor for an interactive discussion with participants in situ and online. The workshop will enlist the key elements of a future data curriculum.


Session Organizers

Monday December 18, 2017 09:00 - 10:30
Room XI - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

09:00

Body as Data: Dataveillance, the Informatisation of the Body and Citizenship (WS180)

Proposer's Name: Ms. valentina pellizzer
Proposer's Organization: Association for Progressive Communication
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Janine Moolman 
Co-Proposer's Organization: Association for Progressive Communication
Co-Organizers:
Ms.,Bishakha,DATTA,Civil Society,Point of View

Session Format: Break-out Group Discussions - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: Bosnia and Herzegovina
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Co-Proposer:
Country: South Africa
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speaker: valentina pellizzer
Speaker: Bishakha Datta
Speaker: Horacio Sívori

Content of the Session:
Surveillance through the collection of population-data has historically functioned as an oppressive tool to control the bodies of women and other marginalised groups, and is closely related to and informed by colonial modes of managing populations underpinned by white supremacist, capitalist and heteropatriarchal ideologies. Today, “big-data,” metadata and the technologies used to collect, store and analyse them are, similarly, by no means neutral, and come with their own biases and resultant exclusions.

The “informatisation” of the body in the digital age is increasingly redefining how we understand “embodiment” and bodily experience. At the level of ICTs and their relationship with public-policy development, both State and powerful non-State actors have come to view the body as data in order to provide services and/or segment and target markets, employing new ways to monitor, assess, analyse, categorise and ultimately manage and control the body. The term “dataveillance,” which combines “data” and “surveillance,” has been used to describe these systematic data-based surveillance practices that involve sorting and aggregating large quantities of data to monitor, track and regulate people and populations.

In this session, participants will discuss and highlight the connection between “big-data,” surveillance and sexuality in the gathering and exploitation of data relating to internet users’ online identities and behaviors. The session will explore the evolution and normalization of surveillance through “big-data” and its relationship with the growing reliance on algorithmic decision-making, particularly at the level of the development and implementation of public policy. Particular emphasis will be placed on how this impacts on especially “at-risk” and marginalised groups such as women and people marginalised on the basis of their sexual orientation and/or gender-identity. Participants will present key issues the internet governance community must consider about the relationship between and impact of power, agency and consent when developing and applying standards and guidelines for the collection and use of internet user data by both State and non-State actors.

Relevance of the Session:
Algorithmic decision-making and data surveillance are often seen as neutral technological tools. However questions of privilege extend to data and the politics of algorithms in several ways - it is a space in which multiple forms of discrimination on the basis of race, religion, class, caste, sexuality, gender and more intersect to exclude, discriminate and further marginalise through lack of inclusion, distortion or hypervisibility in data practices. Being counted in the data is often mandatory for those populations at greater risk of discrimination on account of gender, class or race, since it is enmeshed in platforms to make their voices heard or in mechanisms to access welfare. But concerns around privacy and regulation in data collection and governance also pose a dilemma.

Without adequate and responsive norms and guidelines governing the collection and use of their data, being gendered, raced and classed bodies, necessarily exposes citizens occupying identities and/or presentations outside of the mainstream paradigm (that is: white, privileged, male and heterosexual), and become the subjects of discrimination through technologies otherwise deemed “neutral”.

Tag 1: Big Data
Tag 2: Surveillance
Tag 3: Public Policy

Interventions:
Inputs will be made by the following participants, covering the following issues:
Bishakha Datta - the legal construction of obscenity in the digital realm, and how sexual surveillance applies or is practised, particularly in respect of online content characterised as “obscene.”
Horacio Sívori - the impact of dataveillance and algorithmic decision making on LGBTI struggles in Latin America, with a focus on Brazil .
Jeanette Hoffman - informed consent in data protection.
Ralph Bendrath - perspectives on data protection in the EU.
Katarzyna Szymielewicz - human rights implications on the digitilisation of social policy in Poland.

Diversity:
Speakers have been selected on a range of criteria in order to promote maximum diversity in regional representation and expertise, stakeholder groups, level of profile in the internet governance and human rights communities, and perspectives on an issue of common interest.

Provisionally confirmed speakers represent voices, experiences and perspectives from the Asia Pacific and GRULAC regions.

In addition to their area of expertise, perspectives and profile in policy-making, further speakers will be selected in a manner that intersects the voices of women and sexually marginalized people with the voices of regulators, researchers from varied geographical regions, and activists working on issues concerning of “big-data” and social policy .

Onsite Moderator: valentina pellizzer
Online Moderator: Janine Moolman
Rapporteur: Jac sm Kee 

Online Participation:
Throughout the session, the tags #IGF2017 and #genderit will be used to curate and facilitate online discussion and participation from off-site participants through Twitter. APC will also solicit questions ahead of time from those who cannot attend in person by publicizing the workshop on Twitter, and through our Exploratory Research on Sexuality and ICTs (EroTICs) project - a global network of 50 activists, academics, and organizations working at the intersection of sexual and digital rights. We work on sexuality issues including LGBT rights, sex work, sex education, SRHR rights, and gender-based violence, in addition to internet freedom advocates, policy experts, and techies.

A dedicated communications person will be available to facilitate online participation and to increase the visibility of the session and IGF among the networks of the co-organisers. The online moderator will have the online participation session open and will ensure communication with the onsite moderator to make sure online participants are able to make interventions and raise questions. This person will also be working on the live visual aid for the whole session towards setting up the chart that identifies key issues raised.

Discussion facilitation:
The session will start with a five-minute briefing by the moderator which outlines the background and objectives of the workshop introducing the key concepts of big data, sexuality and surveillance. The speakers will provide additional context and specific examples to help setting a common ground for the group’s work.

Participants will then work in small groups to share cases from their regions. Using the examples as case-studies, groups will be invited to identify and reflect on data practices that duly acknowledge the agency and consent of users. Examples may include practices which:
oppose the non-consensual collection of data.
empower women and sexual minorities.
display adequate care in protecting the data, privacy, and anonymity of activists and the communities they engage with.
work to expose and level algorithmic discriminations.
The groups will be invited to report back for a final round of comments and highlights.

The moderator will tie the discussion into each of these sections to ensure the conversation is coherent, informative, and useful. The session dynamic will be 30 minutes for setting the baseline and framing the issues, 20 minutes for group work and 40 minutes for reporting back, highlighting common threads, emerging practices/scenarios and ways forward. 

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: Yes
Link to Report: http://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/index.php?q=filedepot_download/4098/299

Additional Reference Document Link: http://www.genderit.org/resources/big-data-and-sexual-surveillance

...

Session Organizers

Monday December 18, 2017 09:00 - 10:30
Room XXV - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

09:00

Social Responsibility and Ethics in Artificial Intelligence (WS12)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Jia He
Proposer's Organization: Bytedance
Co-Proposer's Name: Mr. William Drake
Co-Proposer's Organization: University of Zurich
Co-Organizers:
Ms., Jia HE, Private Sector, Bytedance
Mr., William J. Drake, Civil Society, University of Zurich
Ms., Xu Zhao, Technical community, China Academy of ICT


Session Format: Panel - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: China
Stakeholder Group: Private Sector

Co-Proposer:
Country: Switzerland
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speaker: Urs Gasser
Speaker: Ping Lang
Speaker: William Drake
Speaker: Zhang Hongjiang
Speaker: Irakli Beridze
Speaker: Karen McCabe Karen McCabe
Speaker: Chwee Chua

Content of the Session:
AlphaGo of Google Deepmind beat Li Shishi, autonomous vehicles of Uber and Tesla are testing on the road, Xiao Ming robot of Bytedance wrote sport news in 3 seconds / article……. artificial intelligence (AI) and our lives are getting closer. The breakthroughs in AI will rapidly transform digital society and greatly improve labor productivity, but also will raise a host of new and difficult issues concerning e.g. employment, ethics, the digital divide, privacy, law and regulation. In consequence, there is a growing recognition that all stakeholders will need to engage in a new and difficult dialogue to ensure that AI is implemented in a manner that balances legitimate competing objectives in a manner that leaves society better off.

While engineers may share technical ideas within transnational expert networks, broader public discussions about the social consequences and potential governance of artificial intelligence have tended to be concentrated within linguistic communities and civilizations. However, many of the issues that AI raises are truly global in character, and this will become increasingly evident as AI is incorporated into the functioning of the global Internet. There is therefore a pressing need to establish a distinctively global discourse that is duly informed by the differences between Eastern and Western cultural values, business environments, economic development levels, and political, legal and regulatory systems. For example, to the extent that we need to embed machines into social matrices reflective of human values,, how do we do this in a manner that can be accepted by both Western and Eastern societies? Does artificial intelligence require a minimum layer of common standards and practices that are globally consensus-based? Who would play what roles in which institutional setting in order to promote a measure of consensus? Is it possible to construct an open multistakeholder process for this purpose? Should there be any role for intergovernmental cooperation alongside such an effort? The objective of this workshop would be to begin an exploratory conversation about these and related questions.

Relevance of the Session:
It related to the main theme of IGF 2017: "Shape Your Digital Future!"
It related to the hot topic of 2017: Artificial Intelligence
It related to the governance and ethics issues of AI.
It related to East-West Dialogue


Tag 1: Digital Transformation
Tag 2: Artificial Intelligence
Tag 3: Multistakeholder Cooperation

Interventions:
1. Mr. Urs Gasser, Harvard University will talk about the impact of law and regulations in the development of AI in the West.
2. Mrs. Ping Lang, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences will talk about the impacts of AI on employment and economic growth in the East.
3. Mr. William J. Drake, University of Zurich will discuss options for constructing global multistakeholder dialogue.
4. Mr. Zhang Hongjiang, Bytedance will talk about the social responsibilities and practices of AI companies which have AI produces all around the world.
5. Mr. Irakli BERIDZE, UNICRI will talk about intergovernmental aspects of security and privacy issues in AI.
6. Ms. Karen MCCABE, IEEE will talk about the ethical design of AI systems.
7. Mr. Chwee Chua, IDC will talk about the opportunities and challenges of AI for the digital economy and society Globally.

Diversity:
A. Gender diversity
Panelists: 3 women and 4 men on the panel.
Online Participants: 2 women and 1 men
Organizers: 2 women and 1 man.
Rapporteurs: 1 woman and 1 man.
Onsite moderator: 1 woman.

B. Geographical diversity
Panelists:
3 from Asia Pacific
3 from West European and Others Groups (WEOG)
1 from Eastern European Group
Online participants:
1 from Africa Group
1 from Middle East
1 from Asia Pacific

C. Stakeholder groups:
Panelists:
2 from civil society (Harvard University, University of Zurich, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences)
2 from the private sector which provides international services (Bytedance, IDC)
2 from the technical community (IEEE, China Academy of ICT)
1 from an intergovernmental organization (UNICRI)
Online participants:
1 from government (ICANN GAC)
1 from private sector (Mobile Web Ghana)
1 from civil society (Israel AI policy scholar)
1 from technical community (China Academy of ICT)

Onsite Moderator: Jia HE
Online Moderator: Xu Zhao
Rapporteur: James George Butcher

Online Participation:
Ms.Florence Toffa, the executive director of Mobile Web Ghana, Africa.
Mr. Feng Guo, vice president of ICANN GAC
Ms. Danit Gal, Israel AI policy scholar
Mr. Yue Liu, chair of Internet technology and policy, China Academy of ICT

Discussion facilitation:
Ms. Jia He (onside moderator) will communicate with all the panelists about the name list, agenda, questions' direction in advance. She will prepare a table for the panel with 8 table mics, 1 mic for onsite audience, and 1 mic for online moderator.
Ms. Xu Zhao (online moderator) will set up the equipment for the online participation. We will firstly use the IGF recommended equipment to make the online participant possible. Online moderator will take the training and work closely with the IGF workshop facilitators. If IGF does not provide those equipment, Bytedance has its own App which has live broadcast function (called Toutiao). Bytedance is professional to provide live broadcast, and would like to bring the equipment including camera to the conference and make live videos for online participants. Before the beginning of the panel, online moderator will provide a link for all the online participants with email. When the panel is ready to start, online moderator will open every equipment. Attendees can watch the panel and ask questions/make comments via several ways. Bytedance will also create a zoom code/skype account for online attendees as an alternative. Ms Xu Zhao will initiate an online training with zoom/skype for potential attendees. Online attendees will have a separate queue and microphone, which will rotate equally with the mics in the room. Ms Xu Zhao will check the order according to the time marked at different queues. 

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: No
Link to Report:   

Agenda:

Introduction by medorator: Jia He (3 mins)

Speakers (10 mins):

1. Mr. Urs Gasser, Harvard University (5mins) 

2. Mr. Zhang Hongjiang, Bytedance (5mins)

Panel discussion (50mins):

1. Mr. William J. Drake, University of Zurich 

2. Mrs. Ping Lang, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences 

3. Mr. Irakli BERIDZE, UNICRI 

4. Ms. Karen MCCABE, IEEE 

5. Mr. Chwee Chua, IDC 

Onsite Q&A (5mins):

1. Mr. Baoguo Cui, Tsinghua University(2 mins Q+3 mins A) 

Online Q&A (20mins):

1. Ms.Florence Toffa, the executive director of Mobile Web Ghana, Africa. (2 mins Q+3 mins A) 
2. Mr. Feng Guo, vice president of ICANN GAC (2 mins Q+3 mins A) 
3. Ms. Danit Gal, Israel AI policy scholar (2 mins Q+3 mins A) 
4. Mr. Yue Liu, chair of Internet technology and policy, China Academy of ICT (2 mins Q+3 mins A) 

Summary by medorator: Jia He (2 mins)

 

...

Session Organizers
avatar for Jia He

Jia He

Bytedance


Monday December 18, 2017 09:00 - 10:30
Room XII - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

10:00

LOCAL INTERVENTIONS, GLOBAL IMPACTS: HOW CAN INTERNATIONAL, MULTISTAKEHOLDER COOPERATION ADDRESS INTERNET DISRUPTIONS, ENCRYPTION & DATA FLOWS
This main session discusses the impacts that national policy initiatives may have on the global Internet environment and the jurisdictional issues still to be solved. Experts will discuss three different but interrelated topics: Internet disruptions (such as shutdowns and slowdowns), encryption, and data flows. The session shall also discuss how multistakeholder dialogue can leverage its role towards the solution of major problems along these three main topics.

While there is widespread awareness about human rights-related aspects of these issues, there is little discussion about the aggregate effects that they might have on the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals. Considering that the IGF 2017 will be held in Geneva, this session also aims at involving intergovernmental organizations that can feed into the debate and share their experiences in implementing cooperative efforts towards the solution of those problems.

Following main policy questions will be addressed during the debate:

  • Internet disruptions. How has the debate around Internet disruptions evolved during recent years, especially regarding new motivations and reasons for disruptions and how they impact on the global infrastructure of the Internet?
  • Encryption. Has the debate around encryption evolved to a point where it poses a threat to public and national security that requires international cooperation to solve the issues of “local interventions, global impact” regarding encryption?
  • Data flows.  How can international cooperation help solve the issues of "local interventions, global impact" regarding data flows, especially if there is an inherent conflict between the collection/use of data as a tool for development and humanitarian projects and the protection of privacy?
  • Regarding issues of Internet disruptions, encryption and data flows, how can international organisations adapt to the ever-changing data policy environment while working on improving human rights, peace, and well-being?
  • How can efforts for cooperation and capacity development improve strategies, planning, outreach, and effectiveness in these areas to ensure concrete, positive communication and direction?

 

Moderator: Tereza Horejsova, Geneva Internet Platform and Diplo Foundation

Rapporteur: Katherine Townsend, USAID and Africa Open Data Conference Movement

Invited speakers are listed below:

Technical Community and Academia

  • Riana Pfefferkorn, Stanford, USA (confirmed)
  • Demi Getschko, NIC.br, Brazil (confirmed)
  • Raúl Echeberría, ISOC, Uruguay (confirmed)
  • Stefania Milan, Amsterdam University, NL (confirmed)

Civil Society

  • Melody Patry, Access Now, UK (confirmed)
  • Bertrand de la Chapelle, Internet and Jurisdiction, France (confirmed)
  • Anriette Esterhuysen, APC, South Africa (confirmed)
  • Luis Fernando García, R3D, México (confirmed)

Private Sector

  • Fiona Asonga, Telecommunications Service Providers Association of Kenya (confirmed)
  • Vint Cerf, Google, USA (confirmed)
  • Christoph Steck, Telefonica, Spain (confirmed)
  • Paul Nicholas, Microsoft, USA (confirmed)

Government

  • Stefan Schnorr, BMWI, Germany (confirmed)
  • Farida Dwi Cahyarini, MCIT, Indonesia (TBC)

Intergovernmental and International Organizations

  • David Kaye, UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression (TBC)
  • Anne Carblanc, OECD, France (confirmed)
  • André Laperrière, Global open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition, UK (confirmed)
  • Moctar Yedaly, African Union (confirmed)

 


Session Organizers
avatar for Wisdom Donkor

Wisdom Donkor

President / CEO, Africa Open Data and Internet Research Foundation
avatar for Flavio Rech Wagner

Flavio Rech Wagner

Board member, CGI.br
Professor for Computer Science and Engineering at the UFRGS (Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul), in Porto Alegre, Brazil.


Monday December 18, 2017 10:00 - 13:00
Main Hall - Room XVII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

10:10

The Future of Work: Is the Gig Economy Working for Developing Countries? (WS60)

Proposer's Name: Mr. Galperin Hernan
Proposer's Organization: USC/DIRSI
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Galpaya Helani
Co-Proposer's Organization: Lirneasia
Co-Organizers:
Ms., Helani, GALPAYA, Civil Society, Lirneasia
Mr., Hernan, GALPERIN, Civil Society, USC/DIRSI


Session Format: Panel - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: United States
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Co-Proposer:
Country: United States
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speaker: Galperin Hernan
Speaker: Helani Galpaya
Speaker: Alison Gillwald
Speaker: Valerio DeStefano
Speaker: Jacki O'Neill
Speaker: Sunil Johal
Speaker: Vigneswara P Ilavarasan
Speaker: Pablo Bello
Speaker: Mona Badran

Content of the Session:
Digitization and networked communications are increasingly touching all aspects of modern life. Among them is employment, which has served as a key organizing principle for society since the industrial revolution. Currently, a number of forces are reshaping traditional employment, and more generally how labor markets operate. First, advances in artificial intelligence in combination with modern robotics are threatening to automatize jobs that were previously considered too complex for non-human execution. Second, online labor platforms facilitate the unbundling of work into smaller tasks that employers can contract out to freelance workers around the world.

From a development perspective, the digitization of work enables job seekers in poor countries to enter labor markets in rich countries, previously inaccessible due to high communication costs and barriers to labor migration. Virtual labor mobility thus has the potential to raise incomes by decoupling workers from the geographical constraints of local labor demand and improving matching with individual skills. At the same time, online work may erode labor protection standards and unleash a global race to the bottom in wages and workers’ rights. Further, there is evidence that online labor platforms exacerbate the frictions that result in inferior labor outcomes for women, ethnic minorities and other disadvantaged groups.

In sum, there is much that remains to be understood about the digitization of work and its long-term implications for development. This panel seeks to tease out the main questions and present evidence based on current research projects about the future of work in development contexts.


Relevance of the Session:
This session addresses Work in the Digital Age, an emerging issue identified in the IGF 2017 Call for Proposals. It brings current research and relevant stakeholders to discuss how work is changing in the age of AI and the emergence of digital labor platforms, and how different stakeholders (workers, governments, civil society, industry) are responding to these changes.

Tag 1: Digital Work
Tag 2: Internet Economy
Tag 3: 

Interventions:
The panel will begin with 5 minutes of opening remarks and a brief presentation of the speakers by the moderator. Each panelists will then deliver a short (8 minute) presentation. This will be followed by 10 minutes of questions/answers proposed by the moderator. The moderator will then open the floor for 30 minutes of questions and comments from the audience and remote participants. The last 5 minutes will be used as a wrap-up led by the moderator.

Diversity:
The selection of panelists seeks to bring contributions from diverse stakeholder perspectives and regions. Helani Galpaya, Alison Gillwald and Hernan Galperin are part of a multi-year, multi-region research project that examines the impact of labor digitization on workers in South Asia, Africa and Latin America respectively. The project collects evidence from household surveys as well as from transactional data collected from online labor platforms, all of which will be presented at the panel.

Vigneswara Ilavarasan is an expert on IT outsourcing and has studied the Indian BPO industry extensively. He combines industry experience with research expertise on the topic. He is based at IIT Delhi.

Sunil Johal was a Director with the Ontario Ministry of Economic Development and Innovation, and is currently Policy Director at The Mowat Centre, an independent public policy think tank located at the University of Toronto, where he studies how governments are adapting social safety programs for the gig economy.

Jacki O’Neill is a Researcher at Microsoft India, and combines industry and research perspectives on how to design appropriate technologies for emerging markets. Her latest work focuses on crowdwork and ‘peer economy’ platforms.

Pablo Bello is the Executive Director of the Inter-American Association of Telecom Operators (ASIET) and the Latin American think tank of Telecommunications (cet.la). Mr Bello is an expert on telecommunications public policy and on digital development.

Mona Badran is Associate Professor at the Faculty of Economics & Political science in Cairo University. She has previously worked as a consultant with Orange R&D Labs in Cairo, and as an economist with Bearing Point a USAID contractor in 2007.

Finally, Valerio de Stefano is a lawyer with the International Labour Office (ILO) who has worked on the adaptation of employment contracts to digital work, and more generally on workers’ rights in the gig economy.

In terms of gender diversity, the panel is roughly balanced (4 female, 5 male panelists). There is also regional diversity, with participants representing Africa, South Asia and Latin America (in addition to Canada and a multilateral organization).


Onsite Moderator: Hernan Galperin
Online Moderator: Aude Schoentgen
Rapporteur: Aude Schoentgen

Online Participation:
Online participation will be promoted in advanced through social media and relevant email lists. The onsite moderator will coordinate with the online moderator to ensure equal participation between onsite and remote participants during open debate. The online moderator will be required to participate in a training session in preparation for the panel.

Discussion facilitation:
As per above, the onsite moderator will promote discussion among panelists, the audience and remote participants. There will be a set of questions projected on the screen to orient the discussion. These questions will emerge from panelists and will be organized by the onsite moderator.

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: Yes
Link to Report: http://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/index.php?q=filedepot_download/4098/233

Background Paper

Agenda: 

The panel will begin with 5 minutes of opening remarks and a brief presentation of the speakers by the moderator. Each panelists will then deliver a short (6 minute) presentation. This will be followed by 10 minutes of questions/answers proposed by the moderator. The moderator will then open the floor for 30 minutes of questions and comments from the audience and remote participants. The last 5 minutes will be used as a wrap-up led by the moderator.

 


Session Organizers

Monday December 18, 2017 10:10 - 11:40
Room XXIII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

10:10

Digital inclusion for women: Scaling up our efforts (WS49)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Claire Sibthorpe
Proposer's Organization: GSMA
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Lindsey Dominica
Co-Proposer's Organization: GSMA
Co-Organizers:
Ms., Claire, SIBTHORPE, Private Sector, GSMA
Ms., Dominica, LINDSEY, Private Sector, GSMA


Session Format: Panel - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: United Kingdom
Stakeholder Group: Private Sector

Co-Proposer:
Country: United Kingdom
Stakeholder Group: Private Sector

Speaker: Doreen Bogdan-Martin
Speaker: Yannick Glemarec
Speaker: Mai Oldgard
Speaker: Nanjira Sambuli
Speaker: Garcia Garcia Ramilo
Speaker: Rachel Samren

Content of the Session:
We cannot afford to leave anyone behind in the digital future. Unfortunately, despite an increased number of initiatives looking at the barriers to gender equality in internet access, the digital gender divide remains. Indeed, the ITU’s most recent estimate indicates that the global Internet user gender gap has grown from 11% in 2013 to 12% in 2016. Today, penetration rates remain higher for men than women in all regions in the world.

It is increasingly urgent that effective, tangible and measurable action should be taken to overcome the digital gender gap in access. A widening digital gender gap has significant implications in terms of women’s empowerment and development as well as for societies, businesses and economies. A focus on gender equality in the digital world is critical to discussions on shaping the digital future.

The gender divide in internet access and use is driven by a complex set of social, economic and cultural barriers. It requires a holistic approach and action by all stakeholders if it is to be addressed. It also requires that we look at how we deliver concerted action and at scale. The recent report from Broadband Commission for Sustainable Development’s Working Group on the Digital Gender Divide, proposes a set of clear and specific recommendations for different stakeholders to address the gender gap in internet access and use, in a clear and concerted ‘Call to Action’. However, addressing this gender divide also requires that we deliver concerted action and at scale.

While there have been efforts to address the digital gender divide, much more is required and it is critical that we take action which enables us to take significant strides to address the digital gender divide. This interactive panel will bring together high level panellists from different regions and stakeholders to explore how we can deliver at scale and address the digital gender divide. Panellists will explore this issue followed by contributions from the audience. This interactive discussion with workshop participants will focus on how we can scale up efforts to ensure digital inclusion for women. Join us to discuss how we can address the digital gender divide, realize this significant opportunity and ensure that women are equally part of the digital future.

Relevance of the Session:
A widening digital gender gap has significant implications in terms of women’s empowerment and development as well as for societies, businesses and economies. It is increasingly urgent that effective, tangible and measurable action should be taken to overcome the digital gender gap in access. A focus on gender equality in the digital world is therefore critical to discussions on shaping the digital future. Addressing this gender divide requires that we deliver concerted action and at scale. This interactive panel will bring together high level panellists from different regions and stakeholders to explore how we can deliver at scale, address the digital gender divide and ensure that women are equally part of the digital future.

Tag 1: Gender Issues
Tag 2: Digital Future
Tag 3: digital inclusion

Interventions:
This session will be structured such that there is an interactive panel will bring together high level panellists from different regions and stakeholders to explore how we can deliver at scale and address the digital gender divide. Panellists will explore this issue followed by contributions from the audience. After initial contributions from the panel where each will share their experiences and insights, the discussion will be opened up to the workshop participants. There will be an interactive discussion with workshop participants which will focus on how we can scale up efforts to ensure digital inclusion for women.

Panelists:
- The ITU and UN Women have both been driving a number of efforts to address the digital gender divide. Last year they luanched 'EQUALS’ (the Global Partnership for Gender Equality) aimed at accelerating global progress to bridge the gender digital divide. Senior representatives from both organizations leading these efforts will be asked to speak about their experience and how we can scale up efforts to ensure digital inclusion for women.

- Mobile operators are driving efforts to accelerate digital and financial inclusion for women. For instance, through the Connected Women Commitment Initiative, mobile operators are making formal commitments to size and reduce the gender gap in their mobile internet and/or mobile money customer base by 2020. Senior representatives driving these efforts from Millicom and Telenor will speak about their experiences in Africa, Asia and Latin America and what is required to reach women at scale.

- Najira Sambuli from the Web Foundation and Chat Garcia Ramilo from the Association for Progressive Commmunications (APC) are both driving forward both research and activities focused on addresssing the gender divide. They will bring in the perspective of those working in non-governmental organisations in different regions.

- We will also ensure that there is a government speaker on the panel since the digital gender divide can only be addressed by targetted action by all stakeholders and government is a key stakeholder.


Diversity:
We already have five confirmed speakers representing a diversity of stakeholders and regions:
• Ms. Doreen Bogdan-Martin, Chief of the Strategic Planning and Membership Department, International Telecommunications Union,
• Yannick Glemarec, Deputy Executive Director, UN Women
• Mai Oldgard, Senior Vice President, Head of Group Sustainability, Telenor
• Nanjira Sambuli, Digital Equality Advocacy Manager, Web Foundation
• Chat Garcia Ramilo, Deputy Executive Director, Association for Progressive Communications
• Rachel Samren, EVP Chief External Affairs Officer, Millicom

We will also ensure we have a confirmed government speaker. We therefore have confirmed speakers which bring a diversity in terms of gender, geography (including those representing global organisations as well as those based in Africa and Asia) and stakeholder groups (including private sector, international organisations and civil society). 

Onsite Moderator: Claire Sibthorpe
Online Moderator: Yiannis Theodorou
Rapporteur: Dominique Lazanski

Online Participation:
We intend to open up the discussion to online attendees to be able to both make an input and raise a question. The online moderator will work with the workshop moderator to ensure that they have equal opportunity to participate (e.g. will have separate queues for online and onsite attendees to intervene and rotate equally betweeen the two). We will ensure that we have an appropriately trained remote moderator, work with the IGF team to ensure that the online participation session is set up appropriately and also ensure we are learning from others on how to best support effective online participation of the IGF. 

Discussion facilitation:
Session format:
- Interactive panel will bring together high level panellists from different regions and stakeholders to explore how we can deliver at scale and address the digital gender divide. This session will be moderated by Claire Sibthorpe (Head of Connected Women, GSMA)
- After initial contributions from the panel where each will share their experiences and insights, the discussion will be opened up to the workshop participants (audience members and online participants). There will be an interactive discussion with workshop participants which will focus on how we can scale up efforts to ensure digital inclusion for women.
- The workshop session will conclude with a brief final remark from each of the panelists on how to scale up efforts to bridge the gender divide following the discussions and short summation of the discussion by the moderator.

This workshop will be moderated by Claire Sibthorpe (Head of Connected Women, GSMA)

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: No
Link to Report: 

Additional Reference Document Link: http://broadbandcommission.org/Documents/publications/WorkingGroupDigitalGenderDivide-report2017.pdf

Agenda: 

Introduction: Claire Sibthorpe, Head of Connected Women, GSMA

Panel discussion: Panelists:

  • Ms. Doreen Bogdan-Martin, Chief of the Strategic Planning and Membership Department, International Telecommunications Union
  • Yannick Glemarec, Deputy Executive Director, UN Women
  • Mai Oldgard, Senior Vice President, Head of Group Sustainability, Telenor
  • Nanjira Sambuli, Digital Equality Advocacy Manager, Web Foundation
  • Rachel Samren, EVP Chief Exte
...

Session Organizers

Monday December 18, 2017 10:10 - 11:40
Room XXVI - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

10:10

Internet + Big Data Governance for Poverty Alleviation and Environment (WS75)

Proposer's Name: Mr. MINGLEI SHE
Proposer's Organization: China Association for Science and Technology
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Chuang Liu 
Co-Proposer's Organization: China Association for Science and Technology
Co-Organizers:
Mr. Ricardo Israel Robles Pelayo,civil society, International Commercial Law of the Universidad Humannas, Mexico (Education, Estado de Mexico)
Mr. kalanidhi Adinarayana, civil society,Common Wealth Science and Technology Academy for Research, Indian
Mr. Waweru Mwangi, civil society,Institute of Computer Sciences and Information Technology, Jomo Kenyatta University for Agriculture and Technology, Keynya (Education, Nairobi, Kenya)
Mrs. Meng Zeng, Inter-govermental Organization,Development Program of United Nations (UNDP)
Mr. Yunqiang Chu, government, ICT for Agriculture, Agriculture Department of Guizhou Province, China
Mr. Jinnian Wang, Private sector, China Remote Sensing Application and Technology Ltd.
Mrs. Babara Rayn, Inter-govermental organization,Group of Earth Observation Geneva


Session Format: Panel - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: China
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Co-Proposer:
Country: China
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speaker: Ricardo Israel Robles Pelayo
Speaker: Rebecca Ryakitimbo
Speaker: Kalanidhi Adinarayana
Speaker: Waweru Mwangi
Speaker: Xiang Zhou
Speaker: Chuang Liu
Speaker: Barbara Ryan

Content of the Session:
Global internet access creates an equal playing field for both the most and least developed countries in our world socially, politically, and economically. Bridging the digital divide requires hard work from the public, private, and nonprofit sectors.

Part of the U.N.’s goals in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development is to “significantly increase access to information and communications technology and strive to provide universal and affordable access to the Internet in the least developed countries by 2020.”

This workshop is consisted of two groups, one focuses on the Internet + Big data governance for poverty alleviation and other focuses on tthe topic of internet + big data governance for keeping the environment health; both of them will focus their topics on Internet + Big data for reaching SDGs.
Speakers from multi-stake holders will address the issues from technical barriers,local experiences and international cooperation.
The expected outcomes are:
(1) Principles and guidelines of Internet + big data governance for showing cases and best practices in action of poverty alleviation;
(2) Principles and guidelines of Internet + big data governance for showing cases and best practices in action of keeping the environment health
(3) Action lines of Internet + big data governance for poverty alleviation and environment 2017-2018
(4) A workshop on Internet + Big Data Governance for Poverty Alleviation and Environment (Phase I) will be held as a session in China's Data Expo from 25-28, May, Guizhou, China.. The expected outcomes of the session will provided good practice for making the IGF 2017 session success. 

Relevance of the Session:
Internet and Big data provide an unprecedented opportunities for remote area to achieve leapfrog development, however the issues of poverty and environment fragility greatly threaten the well-being of the people living there. With limited internet access and tech-savvy knowledge, they are most vulnerable to the problems such as internet fraud,cybersecurity,digital gap etc. As a result, it is vital that we establish the internet infrastructure with customized internet governance structure in mind, which demands close collaborations between private and public sectors and other multi-stakeholders.
Using technology ( internet,big data etc) to address the issues of poverty and environment is consistent with UN new sustainable development goals agenda.

Tag 1: Access to Information
Tag 2: Internet & ICTs for the Sustainable Development Goals
Tag 3: Environmental Impact of ICTs

Interventions:
Prof. Ms LiuChuang will start the session by welcoming all the speakers( including online participants) and audiences and then give her perspective on policy enact and regulation regarding big data contributing to poverty reduction and environment protection.
Mrs. Meng Zeng from,Development Program of United Nations (UNDP) will share her experiences of using internet to alleviate poverty worldwide.
Mr. kalanidhi Adinarayana from Common Wealth Science and Technology Academy for Research, Indian will address the technical barriers we are going to face when tackling poverty and environmental issues in the developing and the least developed countries.
Mr. Ricardo Israel Robles Pelayo from International Commercial Law of the Universidad Humannas will talk about internet access and human rights (especially women and children).
Mr. Jinnian Wang from China Remote Sensing Application and Technology Ltd will discuss the cooperation between private and public sector.
Mr. Yunqiang Chu from Agriculture Department of Guizhou Province will present his report about big data technology application in Guizhou and current challenges confronted by the government agency.
Mrs. Babara Rayn from Inter-govermental organization,Group of Earth Observation Geneva will talk about how to avoid the lessons the industrialized countries made during the past decade.
Ms Rebecca Ryakitimbo from Tanzania will discuss "Water data for food security and environment conservation to ensure sustainable development.

Other experts and audience will make comments and raise questions in regards to the speeches presented,guided by the moderator.



Diversity:
4 females and 5 males among the 8 speakers confirmed, among them 2 from intenational government, one from the local goverment (Provinceial level), 2 from private sectors, and 3 from education and acdemic communities.
The speakers are from Asia (China and Indian), Africa ( Kennya and Tanzania), South American ( Mexico) and Switherland (Geneva).
Besides 3 experts who participated the IGF many times, 5 of the speakers are first itme to join IGF, They are from Kennya, Indian, China local government and private sector and Geneva.
The diversity speakers will help the expected outcomes more efficient and benefit to all. 

Onsite Moderator: Mr.Qinglin Wang
Online Moderator: Mr Xiaofeng,Tao
Rapporteur: Mr Jiang Dong

Online Participation:
Online participation will be led by a facilitated dialogue. Online attendees will get involved in the workshop during the whole session and have separate queue and microphone which rotate equally with the mics in the room and is entitled to raise questions after each presentation
of the speaker and engage during the panel discussion. Trained online moderator with previous experience will direct the online participation.


Discussion facilitation:
The moderator will open the session by welcoming all the participants,introducing the topic about to be discussed and the speakers present and
online. (10 minutes)
All Speakers make their presentation respectively. After each presentation, the moderator make comments and engage the audiences and online participants in a quick Q&A session.(40 minutes)
Right after the presentations, the moderator will engage the panelists in a lively conversation to get their perspectives on the session and questions raised during the presentations (20 minutes).
The moderator will elicit what panelists find most insightful from the discussion and build on them by asking questions to create active flow of
conversation with both panelists and experts in the audience.(10 minutes)
The last ten minutes, the moderator will warp up the discussion by summarizing the consensus of the facilitated dialogue and pointing out the
challenges we are confronting.(10 minutes)


Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: Yes
Link to Report: http://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/index.php?q=filedepot_download/4098/231

Additional Speakers: 

Meng Zeng,Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations,

She has been working for UN China since 2015. She is the principal author for the first big data report of UNDP on “the Living Standards Dimension of the Human Development Index: Measuring Poverty with Big Data in China” with five big data proxy indicators to measure poverty in 2284 counties across the country. Based on this index and on the data collected in 2284 counties throughout China, she has developed an interactive visualization map, which allows users to zoom in on any province and visualize its performance across all eight indicators. In order to promote application of big data for development, she designed and implemented “Big Data China Road show”.

She is currently working for UNFAO China as Poverty Reduction and Innovation Consultant. She focuses on study and practice of e-commerce for poverty reduction in China through harnessing big data.

meng.zeng@fao.org

Agenda: 

Prof. Ms LiuChuang will start the session by welcoming all the speakers( including online participants) and audiences and then give her perspective on policy enact and regulation regarding big data contributing to poverty reduction and environment protection.
Mrs. Meng Zeng from,Development Program

...

Session Organizers

Monday December 18, 2017 10:10 - 11:40
Room XXII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

10:40

Managing cloud computing in the United Nations system (OF29)
The expansion of Cloud computing services is unavoidable, and so is the need for the United Nations system organisations to resort to such services. One of the immediate benefits of Cloud-based services is the ability to add new infrastructure capacity quickly and at lower costs and the capability of Cloud computing software to easy manipulate large databases according to the needs of the organization.

The United Nations organizations could adapt to changes in the technological and commercial environment without complex procurement processes. With the advent of the Cloud, an organization can try out or develop new applications without first investing in hardware, software, and networking. The Cloud can eliminate many of the traditional computing constraints, including space, time, power and cost.

The challenges related to Cloud computing are related to confidentiality issues with regard to sensitive or private data. There is also a need for the organizations to take responsibility for overall governance of data or services living in the Cloud and to keep internal control over some strategic business processes and intellectual property constraints. The could services must provide a predictable and guaranteed service level and full security of all constituents, which should be properly examined, defined and requested to the service provider. 

Cloud computing is not a simple IT issue: it is a governance challenge and business model issue. The Joint Inspection Unit of the United Nations system intends to undertake a review entitled "Managing cloud computing" in 2018. The objective of this review would be to conduct a comparative analysis of the different Cloud policies, frameworks, practices and processes in the United Nations system, with a view to identifying best practices and lessons learned and thereby promote effective Cloud governance. 

The review could identify new security and privacy issues arising from the use of Cloud computing, evaluate the adequacy of current normative framework and recommend new policies. It could identify what steps are needed to have an adequate regulatory environment by conducting a comparative analysis of the different ICT governance frameworks, practices and processes in the various United Nations system organizations. It will seek to promote effective Cloud governance and system-wide opportunities to share, harmonize and recommended Cloud solutions that do fit, allow and encourage efficient inter-agency cooperation .

Tag 1: Cloud Computing
Tag 2:
Tag 3:
Name(s) of Speaker(s): 

Jovan Kurbalija, Director of DiploFoundation and Head of the Geneva Internet Platform (moderator)
Petru Dumitriu, Inspector, United Nations Joint Inspection Unit
Prado Nieto, Chief Customer Relationship Management, International Computing Centre

Christina Vasala Kokkinaki, Legal Officer, International Organization for Migration

Name of Online Moderator: Barbara Rosen Jacobson
Background Paper:
Past IGF Participation: No
Report Link:
Name: Mr. PETRU DUMITRIU
Organizational Affiliation: UNITED NATIONS JOINT INSPECTION UNIT
 

Session Organizers
avatar for Barbara Rosen Jacobson

Barbara Rosen Jacobson

Programme Manager, DiploFoundation


Monday December 18, 2017 10:40 - 11:40
Room XXV - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

10:40

10:40

CENB III
Session Organizers
avatar for Mili Semlani

Mili Semlani

My voluntary experience with Internet and Communication Technology (ICT) policy space started as a Netmission Ambassador in 2013 and the APrIGF Fellowship in 2017 further propelled my enthusiasm to work in this ecosystem. As a youth ambassador I was part of the pilot team to introduce... Read More →


Monday December 18, 2017 10:40 - 12:10
Room XXVII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

10:40

Small Island Developing States (SIDS) Roundtable: Are we running out of resources & bandwidth? (WS4)

Proposer's Name: Mr. Tracy Hackshaw
Proposer's Organization: Internet Society Trinidad & Tobago Chapter
Co-Proposer's Name: Mr. Patrick Hosein
Co-Proposer's Organization: Director, Trinidad & Tobago Multistakeholder Group (TTMAG)
Co-Organizers:
Mr.,Tracy,HACKSHAW, Technical Community, Internet Society Trinidad & Tobago Chapter (ISOC-TT); Ms.,Maureen,HILYARD, Civil Society, Pacific Islands Chapter of the Internet Society (PICISOC); Dr.,Patrick HOSEIN, Academic Community, Trinidad & Tobago Multistakeholder Advisory Group (TTMAG)


Session Format: Round Table - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: Trinidad and Tobago
Stakeholder Group: Technical Community

Co-Proposer:
Country: Trinidad and Tobago
Stakeholder Group: Technical Community

Discussant: Samuels Carlton - Jamaica
Discussant: Hosein Patrick - Trinidad & Tobago
Discussant: Yaw Ching Rhea Trinidad & Tobago/United States of America
Discussant: Maureen Hilyard - Cook Islands
Discussant: Jane Coffin - United States of America
Discussant: Anju Mangal - Fiji
Discussant: Bevil Wooding - Trinidad & Tobago


Content of the Session:
As the Internet continues growing and consumption patterns increase globally, will there come a point when the resources available in Small Island Developing States be unable to support the needs of its users?

The SIDS continue to struggle with resource challenges in all forms - water, food, shelter, energy, quality of air - and many of these challenges have the potential to further drain the limited bandwidth, network resources and human capacity available to public, private and civil society actors in these territories.

While these resource challenges engage the attention of inhabitants of the SIDS, the Digital Economy is advancing at breakneck speed, attracting talent and attention to the OECD countries, and increasingly, to the emerging mega economies of Brazil, India, Russia and China.

The increasing disparity in resource allocation at all levels exacerbates the "Digital Inclusion problem" - both within SIDS and between SIDS and the OECD+BRIC economies - which then presents "traditional" employers, entrepreneurs seeking to grow and participate in the Digital Economy, Government policymakers grappling with mounting socieconomic challenges and perhaps most critically, the "average citizen".

How then do we, as small, vulnerable economies, work together to meet and rise above this challenge, or risk being quite literally drowned in the Digital Revolution?

The 2017 Roundtable will bring together developmental and Internet Governance and Policy experts from the Caribbean and Pacific Islands as we continue to advance our shared/collective research and action Agenda at the most open and inclusive United Nations Forum dealing with issues relating to the Internet, ICT and Development. 

DRAFT AGENDA

Welcome & Introductions (5 mins)

Discussant Topic 1 - 20 mins - OPEN ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION
As the Internet continues growing and consumption patterns increase globally, will there come a point when the resources available in Small Island Developing States be unable to support the needs of its users?

Discussant Topic 2 - 30 mins - OPEN ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION
The SIDS continue to struggle with resource challenges in all forms - water, food, shelter, energy, quality of air - and many of these challenges have the potential to further drain the limited bandwidth, network resources and human capacity available to public, private and civil society actors in these territories.  How then do we, as small, vulnerable economies, work together to meet and rise above this challenge, or risk being quite literally drowned in the Digital Revolution?

Open Roundtable Discussion & The Way Forward


Relevance of the Session:
The inclusion of the economic action by Small Island Developing States must form a part of any global debate on Shaping the Digital Future. Given the sustainability challenges being faced by the SIDS, the Roundtable and the topic addressing head-on the issue of looming technical, human and bandwidth resource deficits is critical to a Forum looking towards the Future and how ALL stakeholders, including the approximately 65 million inhabitants of the 50+ countries and territories that make up the SIDS.

Tag 1: #accessandinclusion
Tag 2: #sustainabledevelopment
Tag 3: Digital Economy

Interventions:
As we have been doing for the last few years, we will be utilizing our highly successful Roundtable format where everyone in the session can participate equally. Our approach functions in like manner as combined "talkshow" and "Town Hall" format where a moderator will introduce the topic and invite identified "Lead Discussants" (the invited Subject Matter Experts) to introduce the key themes of the discussion - prepared and discussed with the moderator online in the leadup to the IGF - and immediately invite participation from in situ and remote participants on each of the key themes. Discussants and Participants will engage in meaningful dialog while the moderator will work to ensure that the critical elements of the engagement are documented and pushed forward in the ongoing SIDS Action and Research Agenda in the area of Digital/Internet Policy & Governance.


Diversity:
Over 90% of our discussants are from developing countries - the majority being from some of the most vulnerable countries on the planet. Additionally, the very nature of SIDS defines our session as being geographically diverse.

According to the UNOHRLLS, SIDS are by and large very small countries. Cuba is the most populated island with 11.3 million inhabitants and the least populated country is Niue with 1,500 inhabitants. The SIDS have a combined population of about 65 million, which is slightly less than one percent of the world's population. Further, some SIDS like Niue actually experience negative population growth (-2.3 percent) due to the high level of emigration (to New Zealand, in the case of Niue).

In terms of gender diversity, we propose to achieve full gender parity at the level of the Discussants.


Onsite Moderator: Tracy Hackshaw
Online Moderator: ISOC IGF Ambassador from a Small Island Developing State - name to be nominated by the ISOC NGL Leadership
Rapporteur: ISOC Youth@IGF Fellow from a Small Island Developing State - name to be nominated by the ISOC NGL Leadership

Online Participation:
Remote Participants will be treated as equals in the Roundtable. The Remote Moderator will be encouraged to engage in online discussions with our Remote Participants and to create opportunities for interventions in the live session - through both comments and questions - potentially directly from the participant if technically feasible. The Moderator will frequently poll the Remote Moderator during the discussions to ensure that Remote Participants are not treated as an "afterthought". 

Discussion facilitation:
As in the past, the organizers and discussants will use social media and their own networks to "seed" the discussion prior to the Roundtable. Questions and ideas will be incorporated into the planning of the "live" Roundtable and the moderator will pose some of these questions directly during the Roundtable to create further engagement. Additionally, we will appoint a "Social Moderator" who will monitor the #IGF2017 and Workshop hashtags to incorporate comments and questions into the discussion.

Our approach functions in like manner as combined "talkshow" and "Town Hall" format where a moderator will introduce the topic and invite identified "Lead Discussants" (the invited Subject Matter Experts) to introduce the key themes of the discussion - prepared and discussed with the moderator online in the leadup to the IGF - and immediately invite participation from in situ and remote participants on each of the key themes. Discussants and Participants will engage in meaningful dialog while the moderator will work to ensure that the critical elements of the engagement are documented and pushed forward in the ongoing SIDS Action and Research Agenda in the area of Digital/Internet Policy & Governance.


Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: Yes
Link to Report: https://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/filedepot_download/4098/214

...

Session Organizers
avatar for Tracy Hackshaw

Tracy Hackshaw

Chair, Internet Society Trinidad & Tobago Chapter
Connect with me on LinkedIn (www.tracyhackshaw.com)


Monday December 18, 2017 10:40 - 12:10
Room XXI - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

10:40

NRIs Collaborative Session: Digital competences to harness technologies for sustainable development - Cases and Approaches

Co-proposers/co-organizers

  1. Brazil IGF
  2. Central Africa IGF
  3. Portugal IGF


Session 
title
Digital competences to harness technologies for sustainable development - Cases and Approaches

Session format and timing
The session will last for 90 minutes. It will comprise three segments: (a) keynote speech (5-10min); (b) multistakeholder 6 to 8 people round table (35-40min); (c) an open mic including other NRIs in the audience (35-40min).
The workshop starts with a brief explanation of the flow of the session by the onsite moderator(s), which present the keynote speaker and the policy questions that structure the discussion. The keynote speech presents a brief account of the convergence between the Internet governance and sustainable development agendas. A multistakeholder round table of selected NRIs follows the keynote. It aims at enabling the conversation by selected participants around each of the two policy questions presented above. The third segment will host an open mic/dialogue session enabling the participation of people in the audience who wish to join the dialogue. In the end, the moderator(s) will summarize discussions, highlighting consensus achieved by the participants as well as divergences that appeared during the debate.


Content of the session

The session is built around two policy questions regarding the topic: “Digital competences to harness technologies for sustainable development. “ They are: (1) what is the role individual NRI´s in harnessing technologies, through digital competences, for sustainable development within the respective country/region?” and (2) How can NRIs collectively contribute to that goal?

The scope of the competences we need for today´s digital world is changing. The new practices tend to be based online, and users normally interact with them through electronic devices. In the case of the active population, learning, productivity and competitiveness are also increasingly dependent on digital factors, meaning that there is a growing need for digital competences in many different professions.
Digital competences include digital inclusion, formal education, employability, advanced specialization and new knowledge. These competences are part of exercising a full citizenship. A country with digitally proficient citizens is also a country where more people are included, involved, and able to deal with the society they are part of. This applies both to developed countries and others countries that are working to reach that stage.
Digital competences are also intrinsically linked to employability - increasing digitalization in the labor market requires new competences. A more skilled active population generates more new jobs, as well as innovative markets and products, generating more competitive and robust economic activities.
At the same time, all countries must be active agents in the global effort to produce new scientific computing knowledge and develop the capacity to manage and use large amounts of information. We cannot wait to find out what the new technologies will be; we have to create them and work with them.
Creating a more resilient society involves developing new competences, particularly digital ones, which are constantly changing and evolving; at the same time, it involves preparing people for growing uncertainty, recognizing that there are differences that will require unique preparation models.
It is in this context its fundamental to promote a public policy integrated action that aims to stimulate and guarantee the development of competences as tools to help prepare the new generations for the “unknown”, investing increasingly in new knowledge and in the capacity to create new jobs - more qualified and better paid - encouraging entrepreneurship in young people.


Speakers

Keynote: 
Carlos A. Afonso (Expert)

People invited to the round table:
1. Ana Neves (Portugal IGF)
2. Flavio Wagner (Brazilian IGF)
3. Tian Luo (China IGF)
4. Federica Tortorella (IGF Dominican Republic)
5. Michel Tchonang (Central Africa IGF)
6. Anriette Esterhuysen (South Africa)
7. Bertrand Moullier 


Relevance of the issue

The session envisions a discussion among different NRIs that can contribute for the Internet locally and globally. The issue of how the NRIs are individually and collectively organized to foster Internet development is especially relevant to governance and policy arenas such as IGF. The issues under discussion (including the policy questions proposed around which the session is structured) deal with possible strategies that can help stakeholders in the Internet governance arena tackle one of the sustainable development goals. 

The development of digital competences is currently one of the major concerns of both developed and developing nations, for social justice/citizenship, it represents the basic foundation of an inclusive Digital Society.
It encompasses important issues for social justice such as: accessibility, access, education, digital literacy (that comprehends also safety and privacy issues, rights, ethics and so on and so forth) and inclusion. Those areas are of fundamental importance in today's society and represent a concern that must be address in order to achieve the next digital level.

Interventions/Engagement with participants (onsite and online)
Interventions/Engagement with participants is thoroughly described in items “12” and “13” below.


Geographical, Stakeholder and Gender Diversity

The list of participants comprises people from all stakeholder groups and individuals who have convergent and divergent economic, political and social perspectives on the policy question proposed. It also follows a 50/50 gender balance at the time of this submission. They all come from different countries and most of them come from the developing World, some of them being newcomers to the IGF space. 


Onsite moderator(s)

Carlos A. Afonso (Expert)

 
Online moderator(s)
Vinicius Santos (Brazil IGF)


Rapporteur(s)

  1. Maria Luisa Ferreira (Portugal IGF)
  2. Diego Canabarro (Brazil IGF)    

Online participation logistics
Online participation and interaction will rely on the WebEx platform. Those joining the session using WebEx (either invited members of the round-table or the general audience) will be granted the floor in the Q&A segment of the workshop. People in charge of the moderation will strive to entertain onsite and remote participation indiscriminately. Social media (twitter and facebook) will also be employed by the online moderators who will be in charge of browsing social media using some hashtags (to be defined).

Discussion facilitation
The discussion will be facilitated by the on site moderators who will guide the debate in each of the proposed segments for the workshop as well as during the Q&A and comments session in the end.

The first segment of the session  (5-10 min) comprises a keynote speech that provides a brief account of the convergence and digital competences, between the Internet governance and sustainable development agendas. 

The second segment comprises a multistakeholder round table (35-40min) of selected NRIs that aims at enabling an initial conversation by selected participants around the following policy questions (15-20min each) : (1) What is the role of individual NRIs in harnessing technologies for sustainable development within the respective country/region?; and (2) How can NRIs collectively contribute to that goal? For each round, moderators will call up to four participants to (3-5min each) to provide a preliminary answer to the respective question. Moderators will ensure that each person participates at least once in the dialogue.

The third segment (35-40min) will host an open mic/dialogue session enabling the participation of people in the audience who wish to join the dialogue. Those invited to join the round-table may also wish participate in the third segment, but have to enter the cue line as a regular member of the audience. 

Moderators will strictly enforce time limits during all segments of the workshop and will be in charge of using the remaining time of the session to provide general comments on the overall results achieved by the debate during the session. 

 

RESOURCES FOR PROPOSERS

● Sustainable Development Goals: https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/?menu=1300.
● Sustainable Development Knowledge Platform: https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/post2015/summit.
● IGF 2016 Main Session: Assessing the role of Internet Governance in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs): https://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/content/igf-2016-main-session-assessing-the-role-of-internet-governance-in-the-sustainable
● ISOC Factsheet "The Internet and Sustainable Development": https://www.internetsociety.org/sites/default/files/ISOC-ICTs-SDGs-201506-1.pdf.
● "OECD Observer i-Sheet -- The digital economy": http://oecdobserver.org/news/categoryfront.php/id/2270/Digital_economy_2016.html.
● INCoDe.2030  http://www.incode2030.gov.pt/

CONNECTING WITH IGF INTERSESSIONAL GROUPS

● CENB III: http://www.intgovforum.org/cms/policy-options-for-connection-the-next-billion.

● Best Practice Forums: https://www.intgovfor

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Monday December 18, 2017 10:40 - 12:10
Room XXIV - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

10:40

“Data is the New Oil”: Shaping the Digital Economy of MENA (WS50)

Proposer's Name: Mr. Ali AlMeshal
Proposer's Organization: Bahrain ISOC 
Co-Proposer's Name: Mr. Satish Babu 
Co-Proposer's Organization: ISOC-TRV
Co-Organizers:
Ms.,Lianna,Galstyan,Technical Community, .AM Registry, Armenia

Ms.,Sarah, Kiden,Academia, Uganda University

Ms.,Maritza,Minan, Civil society, AUI PERU


Session Format: Round Table - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: Bahrain
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Co-Proposer:
Country: India
Stakeholder Group: Private Sector

Speaker: Walid Al-Saqaf
Speaker: Elias El Boustani
Speaker: Ali AlMeshal
Speaker: Satish Babu

Content of the Session:
One of the most impressive achievements of the Internet has been its impact on the global economy, particularly on the domains of finance, commerce, trade and innovation. The transformative nature of the Internet has resulted today in not just a connected world, but also in a world that transacts together.

The ‘New Economy’, as the Digital Economy is also known, is the result of the transition from the brick-and-mortar businesses of the Twentieth Century to the ‘Brick-and-Click’ and the ‘Click-only’ economies of today, which are built around the Internet. As we look to the future, the Internet is the enabler, the marketplace and the market, and has room for not just giant trans-national enterprises but also for the tiny startups. The space for ‘permissionless innovation’ that the Internet provides, overcomes all barriers such as geography and location.

Despite this sweeping potential, there are substantial variations in the way the Digital Economy has been leveraged by different regions and countries of the world. The Digital Divide that still exists—albeit different from the original digital divide that focused on access—is still a reality. While most people do have access today, the New Digital Divide is between people who have reliable, affordable, fast broadband, and the people who have intermittent, expensive Internet that are difficult to be used for transactional services. Given this gap, there are perhaps few countries amongst Emerging Economies which have fully leveraged the potential of the Internet as much as Developed Economies.

There are, however, a few examples from the Global South that illustrate how the Internet Economy could be leveraged provided there is coherent policy intent coupled with pragmatic and innovative approaches. Prominent amongst these is the Middle East.

As late as five years back, the Middle East was seemingly afflicted by a number of economic issues arising from the global recession, crashing oil prices, the social aftermath of the Arab Spring, subdued local demand, and social inhibitors, which together predicted a deep and protracted economic slowdown for the region.

Despite these dire predictions, the Middle East has shown remarkable resilience in not only maintaining the size of its economy, but even growing in the face of these challenges. The current GDP of the region is USD 1.7 trillion, far surpassing the pessimistic estimates of 2012-13. One of the most important technological enabler of this rebound appears to be the Internet.

This Round-table focuses on sharing the experience of the Middle East in using the Internet in building and stabilizing its Digital Economy, and the lessons for the rest of the world. The experiences of speakers and audience members from other regions of the world as well as their responses to the applicability of the Middle East model in their own context would add richness to the discussions.

The outcome from the session would be to evolve a consensus on the Best Practices in the use of the Internet in realizing the potential of a Digital Economy, and also regional and local Best Practices in any aspect of this transition, including Internet Governance aspects. The speakers at the Round-table represent the different stakeholders of the transition to digital economy, including Business, Government and Civil Society.


Relevance of the Session:
Economic factors lie at the heart of numerous problems that the world faces today. Measures that strengthen the economy will enhance the quality of life of millions of people around the world, permit poverty reduction, improve education & health, promote innovation, attract investment and stimulate wealth creation.

The Middle East, particularly Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and the UAE, were expected to show little growth after the turbulence of the Arab Spring, coupled with the crippling impact of oil price crash. However, a few years later, contrary to expectations, the region has boucned back to a state of growth. To quote McKinsey (2015),

"The Middle East is on the verge of a massive digital disruption. In the past decade, the cross-border data flow connecting the Middle East to the world has increased by more than 150-fold. Several countries--including the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, and Qatar--are leading the digital consumer charge, with high smartphone adoption rates and social media use. "

For workplaces and economies of the future, it is clear that the Internet will play a central role, manifest through such components as e-business, e-commerce, and e-governance. The example of the Middle East, data has become the great lubricant for economic growth.

It is important to discuss and highlight the factors behind this remarkable turn of events, and how governments, Business and Civil Society from around the globe can learn from this Internet-driven transformation.

The Round-table will examine social, economic, technology, policy and Internet Governance drivers that have been at play in the Middle East, that have collectively contributed to this success. It will further examine, through interventions from speakers from different regions, if the same Best Practices would work effectively in other global contexts. Finally, speakers from the Middle East will also touch upon what else needs to be done to take this process to the logical conclusion and complete the transition to a fully-empowered Digital Economy.


Tag 1: Internet Economy
Tag 2: Internet & ICTs for the Sustainable Development Goals
Tag 3: Digital Economy

Interventions:
The Round-Table will have a mix of Subject Matter Experts (Economists, Internet Governance Resource Persons) as well as representatives of Business, Government, and Civil Society from different regions, who will be present in person as well by remote participation and social media (largely Twitter, but questions would be taken on email as well).

The Session would start with the domain experts (Economists and IG specialists) who would start off with a 10 minute introduction to the topic, followed by brief interventions (5 minutes or less) by speakers and walk-in participants (local and remote) from different stakeholder groups. 20 min will be set apart for open questions which will be answered by speakers that the moderator may identify.

There will be no difference in priority between previously identified speakers, walk-in users in the audience, remote speakers and social media participants.


Diversity:
The proposal strives to bring in diversity in its different aspects, as it has speakers, co-organizers, and moderators, from different regions, stakeholder groups, age, gender, disability and specialization. Further diversity will be brought in from participants in the audience as well as remote. While the topic is centered around the Middle East North Africa (MENA) region, the discussions will not be confined to this region, and will touch upon the applicability of the Middle East's Digital Economy model in other regions. By giving appropriate publicity about the workshop, and by ensuring top-class experts amongst the speakers, the workshop will attract a cross-section of audience at the IGF, and further add to the diversity.

Onsite Moderator: Ali AlMeshal
Online Moderator: Lianna Galstyan
Rapporteur: Satish Babu

Online Participation:
The online moderator for the session will be Lianna Galstyan, who is has participated in several IGFs in the past (including IGF 2016) and is an experienced online moderator. Online participation will be encouraged from all participants including the host-provided remote participation tool (such as Adobe Connect) as well as email and Twitter. The online moderator will ensure that remote participants get the same priority as the speakers and the audience physically present in the session. The advantage of the Round-table format is that (a) it is easily amenable to remote participants to see and participate; and (b) since it is based on conversations, it is easier for remote participants to join the discussions.

Discussion facilitation:
The session will follow the following format:

1. Welcome and Session Objectives: Moderator (5 min)
2. The Digital Economic Future: Domain Expert (10 min)
3. The Middle East Experience in Leveraging the Digital Economy: Domain Expert (10 min)
4. Sharing of experiences (3-5 min x 10 = 40 min)
5. Open Q & A (20 min)
6. Summing up and Conclusions: Moderator (5 min)


Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: Yes
Link to Report: https://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/content/igf-2016-day-1-room-7-ws14-asia-an

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Session Organizers

Monday December 18, 2017 10:40 - 12:10
Room XII - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

10:40

Shaping a greener digital environment for all (WS17)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Emily Taylor
Proposer's Organization: Oxford Information Labs Limited
Co-Proposer's Name: Mr. Giovanni Seppia
Co-Proposer's Organization: EURid 
Co-Organizers:
Mr Giovanni Seppia, Technical Community, EURid
Ms Emily Taylor, Private sector, Oxford Information Labs Ltd


Session Format: Round Table - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: United Kingdom
Stakeholder Group: Private Sector

Co-Proposer:
Country: Belgium
Stakeholder Group: Technical Community

Speaker: Mohamad Amin Hasbini
Speaker: Sarah Roberts
Speaker: Sabrina Abualhaiga
Speaker: Giovanni Seppia
Speaker: Jacob Malthouse
Speaker: Emily Taylor

Content of the Session:
The session will take a wide-ranging view of the environmental impact of internet technologies, and what steps need to be taken by all stakeholders to shape a greener digital future for all.

The overall theme of the roundtable is twofold: internet technologies are having an adverse environmental impact; at the same time internet technologies can reduce the impact of climate change in other contexts by increasing efficiency and reducing waste. The session will be forward looking, considering risks of emerging technologies for future generations. It will also highlight examples of good practice by industry players which could be used as a model by others.

Framed as a moderated round-table discussion, which will bring together diverse stakeholders with a broad spectrum of expertise, the 90 minute session will focus on answering the following questions:

• What is the environmental impact of current and future technologies, hardware, software, cloud services and internet of things, and to what extent are consumers aware of it?
• How are businesses and governments reducing the carbon footprint of their current and future digital installations?
• What are the environmental risks if insufficient action is taken?
• What actions need to be taken by different stakeholders to ensure that we have an environmentally sustainable digital future, and what factors are preventing sufficient action being taken?

The emphasis will be on future, practical actions and policy measures that can be applied by all stakeholders to shape a green future digital environment for all.

Relevance of the Session:
Climate change is one of the most urgent challenges facing humanity and collective action is required to shape a more environmentally sustainable digital future. The sustainable development goals recognise the challenge of climate change - relevant to this roundtable are SDG 12 (responsible consumption and production), 13 (climate action) 15 (life on land).

Internet technologies may seem like 'clean' industries, yet the carbon emissions from technology are estimated to outstrip those of the airline industry.

Data centres, cloud services, increased uptake and reliance on digital technologies all create a significant environmental impact such as power and water consumption. At the level of individual Internet users, it is estimated that a user reading the first two words of a web page in a browser generates 20 milligrams of CO2; and 2 Google searches generate the same CO2 as boiling a kettle.

While much remains to be done to reduce such impact, there are signs of progress and good practices which this roundtable will highlight.

Public awareness of the environmental impact of the Internet is low. The metaphors we use to describe internet technologies, 'virtual' 'cloud', incorrectly imply that these services have no physicality. The market drives consumers to upgrade their devices at regular intervals, creating mountains of techno-garbage which are often shipped from the Global North to the Global South for reprocessing. Increased miniturization means that it is more challenging to repurpose or recycle such devices, exposing workers in the Global South to dangerous, toxic conditions. This is relevant to the Internet Governance Forum because the environmental impact of digital devices is significant, yet is rarely considered within the IGF. All stakeholders have a role in overcoming these challenges.

The emerging Internet Governance issue of Internet of Things (IoT) needs to be considered through the lens of its environmental impact. Smart cities, industrial and agricultural applications of IoT can help to combat climate change, for example by increasing efficiency, reducing water and energy consumption, improving road traffic flows to reduce emissions. The economic benefits of having 20 billion connected devices by 2020 should be assessed against their possible, adverse effects on climate and nature.

Tag 1: Environmental Impact of ICTs
Tag 2: Climate Change
Tag 3: Internet & ICTs for the Sustainable Development Goals

Interventions:
Question 1: What is the environmental impact of current and future technologies, hardware, software, cloud services and internet of things, and to what extent are people aware of it?

This will be addressed primarily by participants from the academic community. A speaker from Chatham House / World Economic Forum (TBC), specialising in climate change will set the scene on the pace of climate change, the environmental footprint of digital industries, and how digitisation is helping reduce consumption in other areas.

Dr Sarah T Roberts of UCLA (confirmed) will address the environmental impact of the techno-trash of devices, and the impact on the Global South.

A speaker from the European Commission (TBC), government (LAC or AP region, TBC), or IGO will address relevant regulatory frameworks aimed at reducing the environmental impact of internet technologies, and using internet technologies to reduce climate change. All participants will be encouraged to engage with the question.

Question 2: How are businesses, governments and civil society reducing the carbon footprint of their current and future digital installations?

Giovanni Seppia of EURid (co-organiser, confirmed) will describe how EURid has reduced its carbon footprint since 2011 through the adoption of the EU Eco-Management and Audit Scheme (EMAS). Jacob Malthouse from the .eco domain name registry (confirmed) will provide evidence of its environmentally friendly approach as an internet registry.

A speaker from one of the major Internet technology multinationals (TBC) will describe their efforts to reduce the environmental impact of data centres and defend their record on the recyclability of mobile devices.

Mohamad Amin Hasbini of Kaspersky Labs and a director of Smartcities.org, will describe how Dubai Smart City (a government led project) aims to use IoT deployments to reduce environmental impact of technology and the rapidly expanding city of Dubai.

A civil society representative (TBC) will describe environmentally conscious internet access projects (eg Amazonian rainforest or India). All participants will be encouraged to engage with the question.

Question 3: What are the environmental risks if insufficient action is taken?
This section of the discussion will be led by Sabrina Abualhaiga, Youth IGF Ambassador (confirmed), who will describe the risks for future generations of failing to reduce the environmental impact of internet technologies. Other participants, both planned speakers and audience members will be encouraged to develop ideas on the likely environmental impact of failure to take collect action.

Question 4: What actions need to be taken by different stakeholders to ensure that we have an environmentally sustainable digital future, and what factors are preventing sufficient action being taken?

All speakers and participants will discuss this final question, and ideally point to concrete steps that each stakeholder group is taking or will commit to taking to shape a greener future digital environment for all.

Diversity:
The co-organisers have a strong track record in assembling IGF participants with diversity in gender, geography, stakeholder group, disability and viewpoint, and will adopt a similar approach to gathering participants for this roundtable.

Our confirmed participants include three women and three men. We aim for at least 50/50 gender balance.

We have confirmed participants from the United States, United Arab Emirates, France, Italy, United Kingdom and Belgium. We are actively approaching participants from Latin America, Asia Pacific and Africa to join the roundtable discussion.

Onsite Moderator: Emily Taylor
Online Moderator: Sebastien Pensis, EURid
Rapporteur: Emily Taylor

Online Participation:
The remote moderator will monitor and stimulate discussions in the virtual meeting space. The moderator will regularly report on activity within the virtual meeting room, and will interact with remote participants throughout the session.

The session moderator will call on the remote moderator to feed in comments and chat conversations from the virtual meeting space at several points during the roundtable discussions.

The remote moderator will also liaise with remote participants who wish to make audio interventions during the roundtable session.

The co-organisers have extensive experience of blending remote participation (even remote speakers) into a live session and encouraging par

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Session Organizers
avatar for Emily Taylor

Emily Taylor

Director, Oxford Information Labs
Emily Taylor is an Associate Fellow of Chatham House and is Editor of the Journal of Cyber Policy.  She is a director of Oxford Information Labs. Emily’s research publications include The Internet in the Gulf (Chatham House); “ICANN: Bridging the Trust Gap” and “Privatisation... Read More →


Monday December 18, 2017 10:40 - 12:10
Room XI - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

11:50

Critical issues in improving cyber security incident response (WS39)

Proposer's Name: Mr. Maarten Vanhorenbeeck
Proposer's Organization: Forum of Incident Response and Security Teams (FIRST)
Co-Proposer's Name: Mr. Michael Carbone
Co-Proposer's Organization: Access Now
Co-Organizers:
Mr,.Maarten,VAN HORENBEECK,Technical Community,FIRST
Mr.,Michael,CARBONE,Civil Society,Access Now


Session Format: Panel - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: United States
Stakeholder Group: Technical Community

Co-Proposer:
Country: United States
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speaker: Cristine Hoepers
Speaker: Audrey Plonk
Speaker: Githaiga Grace
Speaker: Mallory Knodel
Speaker: Martijn de Hamer

Content of the Session:
This panel, proposed by FIRST, an international association of CSIRT, and Access Now, a civil society CSIRT, aims to identify critical issues that may affect how CSIRT are trusted or otherwise effective in responding to security incidents across multiple stakeholder groups. Issues that are expected to be raised include privacy of users, human rights issues involved in security response, and the tension between network security monitoring for security purposes, and surveillance.

The goal of the session is to identify types of behavior that may have developed over time between stakeholders around the work of CSIRT. Output from the session will be submitted to a number of forums, including the IGF BPF on Cybersecurity, or the FIRST Special Interest Group on Ethics.

Relevance of the Session:
While much work is being done on making the internet a trustworthy, secure network that can support various uses such as cultural exchange, business transactions and government, security incidents will continue to have an impact.

A cornerstone of security programs both in government and business is the development of a strong incident response program. Incident response programs often result in the creation of a specific entity, commonly referred to as a Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT) or Computer Security Incident Response Team (CSIRT). These organizations exchange information with their peers to detect incidents, and take appropriate steps to mitigate negative impact on their host organization.

CSIRT can have a role that is limited to a particular industry, a specific country, or a specific organizational network. They can also be responsible for the response to security issues in software and networks widely used by individual users.

A concern of incident response is the fact that it needs to operate well across stakeholder groups. Each group has a separate responsibility: government may CSIRT protect national security, protect the economic capability of a state, or protect its citizens. Private sector companies operate large parts of the internet and its infrastructure, and are required to ensure product safety. Civil society helps protect and ensure individual and organizational rights. The technical community is responsible for ensuring the "glue" between each of these works well, and the internet is an enabling service.

In order to truly shape our digital future, these core issues, covering privacy, human rights issues, and tension between stakeholder groups must be openly discussed, learned from, and our ability to deal with them improved.

Tag 1: Cybersecurity
Tag 2: Human Rights Online
Tag 3: Privacy

Interventions:
The workshop is planned as an interactive session with a moderated panel of experts. 40% of the time will be allocated to opening statements from the experts, in which they will be asked to address the indicated questions. 25% of the time will be allocated to interventions from the floor, 25% to interventions from remote participants and 10% of the time for closing statements.

Our lineup of confirmed expert panelists consists of:

Audrey Plonk, Senior Director, Global Cybersecurity and Internet Governance Policy, Intel Corporation (Private sector)
Grace Githaiga, Co-convenor for the Kenya ICT Action Network (Civil society)
Martijn de Hamer, Head of the National Cyber Security Operations Center at NCSC-NL (Government)
Mallory Knodel, Association for Progressive Communications (Civil society)
Cristine Hoepers, General Manager, CERT.br (Technical Community)

Moderator: Michael Carbone, Manager Education Programs, Access Now (Civil Society)
Remote moderator: Maarten Van Horenbeeck, Director, Forum of Incident Response and Security Teams (FIRST)

The following are the way specific topics will be addressed:

Affiliation: Civil Society

We will request Civil Society to discuss some of the challenges civil society experiences when dealing with security incidents, and engaging CSIRT community members for help, in particular those CSIRT from the government or private sector.

Affiliation: Government

We will request our government participants to discuss:
- The challenges in operating a CSIRT, and how to cooperate with other stakeholder groups, such as civil society.
- The implications of working with data on victims of cybersecurity incidents.

Affiliation: Private sector

We will request our private sector participant to discuss some of the challenges in working on product security issues with other stakeholder groups. For instance, how does the impact and response to a security incident change when the incident is exploited, and to what degree does the response become more sensitive. As an example, by disclosing the existence of a vulnerability, exploitation of vulnerable internet users may see an increase when no patch is available.

Affiliation: Technical community (CERT.br)

We will request our technical community participant to share anecdotes, concerns and learnings from working with different stakeholder groups. We will also ask them to share some of the concerns they have identified as being an organization that is required to work with all other stakeholders to coordinate the response to a major incident.

We will specifically ask in-person and remote participants to provide examples of issues they have seen, or to confirm or dispute issues the expert panelists have raised. 

Diversity:
As part of this panel, we have confirmed panelists from Africa, Latin America, Western Europe and North America. We anticipate the panel will be gender equal, which at this point holds true for our confirmed panelists. Representation exists from civil society, government and technical community. Currently each of the speakers listed has been confirmed. If we do need to make replacements closer to the date, we will continue to maintain the same stakeholder group/gender balance to the degree possible.

One of our goals with this panel is to create a forum in which civil society, government, technical community and private sector have the ability to meaningfully interact on some of the more important issues hindering their collaboration in cybersecurity, and in particular in global incident response.

We also plan to engage the potential audience with interest in this session through a number of third party organizations and initiatives, including FIRST, the BPF on Cybersecurity and several industry mailing lists to call for both remote and in-person attendees to participate.

Onsite Moderator: Michael Carbone
Online Moderator: Maarten Van Horenbeeck
Rapporteur: Maarten Van Horenbeeck

Online Participation:
During the session, we will ensure online participation in the following ways:

- A moderator is assigned to the online question queue whom is similar in background and technical expertise as the in-room moderator. The workshop proposer and author of the background paper will be online moderator;
- We will immediately relay questions as the "next up" question from the audience when one is flagged by a remote participant, to avoid unnecessary waiting for the remote participant. If the number of remote questions and comments overwhelms the number originating from the in-person group, we will switch to granting an opportunity to speak to someone remote, and then to someone attending in-person next;
- We plan to specifically advertise the session through relevant forums and mailing lists (including FIRST and the BPF on Cybersecurity) to sollicit participation by remote attendees. Where possible, we will engage with a number of the NRIs which have previously participated in cybersecurity session, or have shown an interest, to contribute their ideas.
- During the session closing, we will do a specific call to get closing remarks from a small number of remote (2-3) participants. We will announce this at the beginning of the session to ensure remote attendees can prepare their thoughts throughout the session.

Discussion facilitation:
The following agenda will be followed:

- Panel introduction by the moderator
- Each panelist introduces some areas of sensitivity around incident response operations they have experienced
- Panel moderator to ask panelists about their views on some of the issues shared
- Moderator to ask remote participants, and local participants, to raise issues they see as being sensitive in conducting incident response on security issues
- Moderator to ask panelists to provide input on some of the issues raised
- Moderator to ask remote and local participants for questions and ad

...

Session Organizers

Monday December 18, 2017 11:50 - 13:20
Room XXV - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

11:50

How devices, content & innovative business models shape our digital future: creativity with purpose (WS71)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Sylvia Cadena
Proposer's Organization: APNIC Foundation
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Pablo Hinojosa
Co-Proposer's Organization: APNIC
Co-Organizers:
Ms., Carolina, CAEIRO, Technical Community, LACNIC Ms., Vymala, Thuron, Technical Community, AFRINIC

Session Format: Round Table - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: Australia
Stakeholder Group: Technical Community

Co-Proposer:
Country: Australia
Stakeholder Group: Technical Community

Speaker: Benjz Gerard Sevilla
Speaker: Michael Ginguld
Speaker: Jennifer Chung
Speaker: Shita Laksmi
Speaker: Steve Song
Speaker: Nicolas Echaniz
Speaker: Carlos Rey-Moreno
Speaker: Jochai Ben-Avie

Content of the Session:
The round table will explore the link between innovative business models for access provision, innovative device designs that contribute to access provision and local content generation to engage local communities as a shift to the paradigm of infrastructure ownership to support underserved communities worldwide.

Two main contributors per topic will provide fire starters remarks for a round table discussion, as follows:

- Devices: Nicolas Echaniz (Altermundi) will focus his contributions about their work designing LibreRouter. Benjz Sevilla (Ateneo de Manila) will share about their work designing drones for humanitarian assistance. They will present the devices they have worked on.
- Jennifer Chung (Dot Asia) will share about the experiences from .Asia supporting organisations that produce local content in Asia, that reflect their cultural identity and Shita Laksmi will share about her experiences supporting organizations developing applications and services for local needs.
- Michael Ginguld (AirJaldi), Steve Song (NSRC) and Jochai Ben-Avie (Mozilla) will speak about innovative business models for access provision.
 
The round table will focus on identifying the correlation among the 3 elements outlined above and the challenges that those seeking to address the needs of underserved communities faced when tackling the access challenge and the barriers for innovation. 

Relevance of the Session:

Many of the challenges associated with connecting the next billion are associated with the technologies that can be of use to connect communities in underserved areas and the challenges to provide reliable connectivity that supports economic and social development. However, most of the conversations are around the use of devices that are developed in the north, with traditional business models for commercial viability in mind.

This session will contribute to explore issues around ownership of the creative power that could leap the access discussion forward, where innovation is not only applied to the how (devices and technologies) but the what (content and services) and the who and for how long (alternative business models). 

Tag 1: Internet & ICTs for the Sustainable Development Goals
Tag 2: Internet-based Innovation
Tag 3: Local access

Interventions:

- Devices: Nicolas Echaniz (Altermundi) and Carlos Rey-Moreno (UWC) will focus his contributions about their work designing LibreRouter. Benjz Sevilla (Ateneo de Manila) will share about their work designing drones for humanitarian assistance. They will present the devices they have worked on.

- Jennifer Chung (Dot Asia) will share about the experiences from .Asia supporting organisations that produce local content in Asia, that reflect their cultural identity and Shita Laksmi (DiploFoundation) will share about her experiences supporting organizations developing applications and services for local needs. 

- Michael Ginguld (AirJaldi), Steve Song (NSRC) and Jochai Ben-Avie (Mozilla) will speak about innovative business models for access provision.

Diversity:
The main contributors bring voices from Argentina (Nicolas Echaniz - Altermundi), Philippines (Benjz Sevilla - Ateneo de Mania), India (Michael Ginguld - AirJaldi), Brazil (Anya Orlova - UNESP) and South Africa (Carlos Rey-Moreno - UWC) as well as regional (Jennifer Chung and Shita Laksmi from the Asia region) and global views from NSRC (Steve Song) and Mozilla (Jochai Ben-Avie) .
5 male and 3 female speakers have confirmed.
Speakers represent private sector, government, civil society, technical community and academia. 

Onsite Moderator: Duncan Macintosh
Online Moderator: Vymala Thuron
Rapporteur: Carolina Caeiro

Online Participation:
Prior to the event, the workshop organisers will request contributions via social media and promote the session to encourage participation.
A group of remote speakers will be assembled prior to the event, based on their ideas and their remote interventions will be given priority during the session.

Discussion facilitation:
The workshop will be moderated by Duncan Macintoch, CEO APNIC Foundation. To ignite the debate and set the scene, the workshop will commence with 3 minute remarks by each of the speakers listed above. Contributions from the pool of remote speakers will then be shared with the group and the microphone will be rolled throughout the room to capture the contributions from the audience.

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: Yes
Link to Report: http://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/index.php?q=filedepot_download/4098/430

Additional Speakers: 

  1. Anna Orlova, Researcher, São Paulo State University (UNESP): Anna graduated from the Saint-Petersburg State University, Russia with MA in psychology and sociology. At the moment Anna is doing academic research with focus on community connectivity and youth engagement and participation in Internet Governance processes. From 2016 she is working as an external researcher in the Fonias Juruá academic research project at the São Paulo State University (UNESP), Brazil, where she is also a project coordinator of FRIDA grant for the sub-project Amazon Digital Radio Network using HF radio band. She's been involved into Internet Governance for the last seven years, working as a researcher and facilitator with various European NGOs and youth organisations, focusing on issues of digital privacy, digital activism, open source, cybersecurity and most recently youth participation in IG. Anna is also volunteering as a researcher and facilitator of digital-x working group at the Cooperation and Development Network - Eastern Europe (http://cdnee.org).
  2. Carlos Rey-Moreno, Post-Doctoral fellow, University of the Western Cape. Post-Doctoral fellow, University of the Western Cape. Dr. Carlos Rey-Moreno is a Post-Doctoral fellow in the Computer Science Department at the University of the Western Cape, South Africa. He received his PhD at Rey Juan Carlos University (URJC, Spain) in 2015. From 2007 to 2011, he was a researcher at the EHAS foundation and URJC, working on the field of rural broadband telemedicine networks for developing countries, participating in the design and implementation of long distance Wi-Fi networks in Spain, Peru and Malawi. Since 2012, he is with the BANG group at UWC. He has been instrumental in the co-creation of Zenzeleni Networks – Mankosi, a telecommunications co-operative in one of the most disadvantaged areas of South Africa, whose sustainability plan has been main focus on his PhD, and has participated as a facilitator in Connecting Eenhana, a community network in the north of Namibia.
  3. Steve Song (NSRC) is an advocate for cheaper, more pervasive access to communication infrastructure in Africa. He is the founder of Village Telco, a social enterprise that builds low-cost WiFi mesh VoIP technologies to deliver affordable voice and Internet service in underserviced areas. Previously, Steve worked at the International Development Research Centre, where he led the organization's Information and Communication Technology for Development program in Africa, funding research into the transformational potential of ICTs across the continent. With NSRC Steve works to develop strategies for expanding the utilization of wireless technologies through unlicensed, dynamic and shared spectrum strategies to enable more Internet access in Africa and other emerging market regions. He writes about affordable access at http://manypossibilities.net.
  4. Jochai Ben-Avie (Mozilla) is the Internet Policy Manager at Mozilla where he works on a range of global issues as diverse as the Internet. Before Mozilla, he lead the Policy Team at Access (AccessNow.org) an international organization that defends and extends the digital rights of users at risk around the world. Jochai is a member of the Freedom Online Coalition's Working Group 1 on an Internet Open and Secure and has previously served on the steering committee of the International Principles on the Application of Human Rights to Communications Surveillance. Prior to his time at Access, he researched terrorism and reconciliation as part of Dr. Kathleen Malley-Morrison’s Personal And Institutional Rights to Aggression Study (PAIRTAS). Jochai graduated summa cum laude from Bard College at Simon’s Rock with a BA in Political Science and Social Psychology.

Agenda: 

5 min. Moderator set the scene – / the round table will explore how shifting the ownership of devices, infrastructure and content platforms can unlock

...

Session Organizers
avatar for Sylvia Cadena

Sylvia Cadena

Head of Programs / ISIF Asia coordinator, APNIC Foundation
Internet development | Capacity building | Funding for innovation / ISIF Asia grants and awards


Monday December 18, 2017 11:50 - 13:20
Room XXII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

11:50

A Playbook for Gender Equality: How to Harness the Power of Digital Media & Emerging Tech (WS57)

Organizer's Name: Ms. Marketa Geislerova
Organization: Global Affairs Canada
Co-Organizer's Name: Ms. Deborah Brown
Organization: Association of Progressive Communications
  

Co-Organizers:
Marketa Geislerova,
the Digital inclusion Lab,
Office of Human Rights Freedoms and Inclusion
Global Affairs Canada
125 Sussex Drive, Floor A3
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
K1A 0G2

Government

Deborah Brown, APC

Association of Progressive Communications
APC Executive Director's Office
PO Box 29755, Melville 2109, South Africa
info@apc.org
Civil Society Association


Session Format: Round Table and Workshop - 90 Min
 
 AGENDA

Moderator: Tara Denham, Director, Democracy Division, Global Affairs Canada

Provocations (20 minutes)

Valentina Hvale Pellizzer, Association for Progressive Communications

What do you think are some of the concrete opportunities and challenges digital technologies pose for gender equality? Do you think that the spectrum is balanced?

Dhyta Caturani, Indonesia-based human rights and women rights activist

How would you assess the state of gender equality in the context of digital media and ICTs today? What issues do you consider to be the most critical?

Irene Poetranto, The Citizen Lab

What effects do cyber policies and regulations have on women and girls? What digital and emerging technologies hold for gender equality if we do not address some of the negative trends we are seeing today? How are Internet censorship, filtering, and surveillance used by some states or proxies affecting women?

Farhaan Ladhani, Perennial, Digital Public Square

Are emerging technologies such as AI a game changer for gender equality? What are some of the opportunities and risks related to these technologies?

Chasers and Clarification (10 minutes) - quick questions and answers with the audience

Building the Playbook (50 minutes)

  1. Survey highlights and game plan - Tara Denham (5 minutes)
  2. Create 4 groups based on broader areas of engagement for gender equality identified in the survey
  3. Each group, led by the four panelists, should strive to:
  • Validate or challenge the strategies for gender equality
  • Outline the "How" or action points
  • If possible, make a concrete commitment to advance gender equality

      4. Opportunity to contribute to another area of engagement/group (15 minutes)

Key take-aways and next steps (10 minutes)

Relevance of the Session:
Shape your Digital Future.

Digital and emerging technologies like Internet, mobile phones and artificial intelligence have the potential to promote gender equality and to combat violence against women and girls (VAWG). But that is not the trend that we currently see. The time is ripe for a discussion of how digital and emerging technologies affect gender equality, and how they can be used to promote a more inclusive world where women are on a level playing field. The objective of the roundtable discussion is to inform and contribute to the creation of a Playbook for Gender Equality in the Digital Age, that will raise awareness on pressing issues at the intersection of digital technologies and gender equality, and lay the ground for the creation of a multi-stakeholder network aimed at ensuring that our collective digital future is positive and empowering for all.
 
Tag 1: Gender 
Tag 2: Cyber VAWG
Tag 3: Artifical Intelligence
 
Onsite Moderator: Tara Denham
Online Moderator: Marc-André Argentino
Rapporteur: Marketa Geislerova

 


Session Organizers
MG

Marketa Geislerova

Senior Analyst, Global Affairs Canada



Monday December 18, 2017 11:50 - 13:20
Room XXVI - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

11:50

Artificial Intelligence and Inclusion (WS241)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Celina Bottino
Proposer's Organization: Institute of Technology and Society of Rio
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Chinmayi Arun
Co-Proposer's Organization: Centre for Communication Governance (CCG) at National Law University, Delhi
Co-Organizers:
Ms.,Celina,BOTTINO,civil society,Institute of Technology and Society of Rio
Ms., Chinmayi,ARUN,civil society,Center for Communication Governance at National Law University, Delhi


Session Format: Round Table - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: Brazil
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Co-Proposer:
Country: India
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speaker: 
Speaker: Malavika Jayaram
Speaker: Chinmayi Arun
Speaker: Urs Gasser

Content of the Session:
The policy debates about Artificial Intelligence (AI) have been predominantly dominated by organizations and actors in the Global North. There is a growing need for a more diverse perspective regarding the policy issues and consequences of AI. The developing world will be directly affected by the deployment of AI technologies and services. However, there is a lack of informed perspectives to participate in the policy debates.

This roundtable is a follow up to the international event “Artificial Intelligence and Inclusion” held in Rio de Janeiro earlier this year. The discussion will be focused on development of Artificial Intelligence and its impact on inclusion in different areas such as health and wellbeing, education, low-resource communities, public safety and security, employment and workplace, and entertainment, media and journalism, among others. The goal of this roundtable is to bring the debates of the this international event to the IGF community, enlarging the conversation and deepening the understanding of AI inclusion challenges and opportunities, to identify and discuss areas for research, education and action.

We want to identify, map, understand, and address the manifold issues around AI and Inclusion from an interdisciplinary perspective, with a particular focus on two (often interrelated, but analytically distinct) dimensions of inclusion: First, the complex set of issues concerning the geographic divide between the Global North and the Global South when it comes to the development, design, and application of AI-based technologies. Second, the uneven impact of AI and related technologies on often marginalized communities, including youth, people in rural areas on with low socio-economic status, LGBTQ, ethnic and racial minorities, people with disabilities, girls and women, etc.


Relevance of the Session:
Artificial Intelligence (AI) and related technologies have started to shape important parts of the digital economy and affect core areas of our increasingly networked societies. Whether transportation or manufacturing, social justice or health and education, AI has the potential to deeply impact our lives and shape our individual and collective futures in ways both visible and hidden. The promise of AI-based technologies is enormous, and benefits range from efficiency gains to unprecedented improvements of quality of life. The challenges and potential risks are equally staggering, for instance when considering the uncertainty regarding the future of labor or the emergence of new power structures outside the control of existing governance and accountability frameworks.

The issues arising from these technologies have to be aligned to humans in terms of our moral values and ethical principles. We shall discuss how to make AI behave in a way that is beneficial to people beyond reaching functional and inclusive goals and addressing technical problems. This will allow for an elevated level of trust between humans and our technology that is needed for a fruitful pervasive use of AI in our daily lives

The event will be highly interactive and participatory. This discussion has to be as diverse as possible so we are focussing on speakers from global south countries. Artificial Intelligence is par of our digital future and it must be intensively discussed in a multistakeholde environment.


Tag 1: Artificial Intelligence
Tag 2: Emerging Issues
Tag 3: Human Rights

Interventions:
The proposed format is a round table. There will be an initial presentation to set the scene and raise the issues that will be debated. The presentation will be followed by an open discussion. In order to provoke an effective debate representatives from government, technical community, civil society, lawyers and representatives from the global south to participate in the round table.

Introduction by Carlos Affonso - 10 min

Round of presentations by the speakers – TOTAL - 60m

Chinmayi Arun, 12 min (Confirmed)

She is from the Centre for Communication Governance at National Law University, Delhi. She discusses the challenges unchecked AI development could pose to civil liberties in Asia. She argues that in a world of conflicting values, it's going to be difficult to develop values for artificial intelligence that are not the lowest common denominator. She brings perspective from India, a country where the balance of power between the citizens and the state is delicate and in her view, there is a great potential for AI to tip that balance of power in favor of the state. She advocates that AI should be intensively discussed now in order to help the people that are designing it think of it in a way that imagines a better world.

Malavika Jayaram, 12 min (Confirmed)

From the Digital Asia Hub. She discusses the language we use to talk about Artificial Intelligence, and the impact of AI in Asia. She studies the impact of AI on Asian countries, that is not monolithic. Asian countries such as Korea, Japan, Hong Kong, Singapore are better equipped and engages with this issue very differently than poorer developing, emerging economies that don’t understand the consequences of AI applications. Malavika have also put together a serie of events in Asia that took place in Hong Kong, Seoul and Japan to discuss challenges of AI and its implications for public good.

Urs Gasser 12 mins (Confirmed)

Executive Director of Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University. Urs is leading a global initiative to address Ethics and Governance of Artificial Intelligence that aims to support interdisciplinary research to ensure that AI develops in a way that is ethical, accountable, and advances the public interest.

Sebastian Sposito, 12 mins (confirmed)

Public Policy and Governmental Relations Analyst from Google. He is based in Mexico and oversees Google’s initiatives related to Artificial Intelligence. As a representative from the private sector, he will be able to share the views and plans of Google regarding AI.

Government Representative, 12 mins (TBC)

Brazilian government representative that is dealing with technology policies and AI development.

Debate 20 mins


Diversity:
This workshop aims at making the discussion regarding AI and its development as more diverse and inclusive as possible, regarding gender and geography. Bearing this in mind, the workshop is being proposed by women from Global South countries, Brazil and India and the panel includes also another woman from Asia. One of the speaker is a first time IGF organizer. We will also include private sector representative from Latin America to add one more perspective from this region of the globe.

Onsite Moderator: Carlos Affonso Souza
Online Moderator: Fabro Steibel
Rapporteur: Celina Bottino

Online Participation:
We will use ITS Rio’s website and mailing lists of the Network of Centers to gather interested online participants, channeling them into the official IGF WebEx environment to participate in the session. It will also be possible for these online participants to submit contributions to the session in advance by email.

Discussion facilitation:
The workshop will have an onsite moderator that will be responsible for presenting the issues that will be debated and to conduct the debate after his presentation, giving opportunity to the diversity of perspectives. The moderator will engage participants to talk about their regional perspectives regarding AI and inclusion.

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: Yes
Link to Report: http://www.intgovforum.org/cms/wks2014/index.php/proposal/view_public/126

...

Session Organizers

Monday December 18, 2017 11:50 - 13:20
Room IX - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

11:50

NRIs Collaborative Session: Fake News, Disinformation, Misinformation: Challenges for Internet Governance

Co-proposers/co-organizers

  1. Colombia IGF
  2. Croatia IGF
  3. Dutch IGF
  4. IGF-USA
  5. Nigeria IGF
  6. UK-IGF​

Session title
Fake News, Disinformation, Misinformation: Challenges for Internet Governance

Session format and timing
Total duration of this session will be 90 minutes.
This session will attempt to be both informative, and interactive between NRIs who have signed up for this NRI session, while also accommodating a brief audience question/comment period. After the opening statement of the moderator(s) which be limited to five minutes to provide an overview of the session, and describe the format, Segment I will focus on understanding the discussions that took place at these NRIs, exchanging also among the organizing NRIs [ 25 minutes] via lightening comments  of 3 minutes from a designated speaker[s] from each of the organizing NRIs, followed by 1-2 minute exchanges among the designated NRI speakers.  
Segment II will be prioritized to hearing a brief round of inputs/comments from any remote NRIs who have previously advised they wish to speak [2-3 minute statements/contributions about what their NRI addressed on this topic, or directly related topics] with priority to any remote hubs of the organizing NRIs who addressed Fake News/Misinformation/Disinformation in their 2017 NRI.  
Segment III: Open Mike, to include both speakers in the room, and remote [but not attending the IGF2017 in person] persons interested/concerned about these issues.  All comments will be limited to 2 minute time slots. 
Segment IV: Summing up from the Rapporteurs in support of the Moderator(s), including identifying as possible, any “messages”, or outputs or key ideas from the Session followed by final comments and thoughts of the moderator(s) about how to advance further work on these important issues.

Content of the session
Determining what is fake news, misinformation, or disinformation, how it has grown, whether it is a real threat to the online world, how it affects citizens, and even elections, or other essential decisions taken at a local/national, or global level has emerged as a major topic of discussion and potentially challenge to the online world. The online communications facilitated by the Internet brings individuals, organizations, and even governments together to share information and exchanges. Yet, if the information cannot be trusted as factual, it may affect decisions and even misinform them. Such concerns affect who trusts whom, who is reliable as a source of information, and what is factual, or non factual, or is only a personal view that can be amplified through the use of online tools. 

The topic of “fake news” or “faked news” or disinformation has gained significant visibility in the last two years. Several NRIs addressed these issues, and are thus organizing this NRI to NRI exchange. They have all taken unique approaches as is suitable to the bottom up approach of each NRI, but the concerns about what is factual, whether via news channels, online messages, or other mechanism are a consistent theme across all the organizing the NRIs to this session. In some countries, and independent media is increasingly challenged. Online information sources, which may present themselves as “independent media” may not bring true independence or fact checking that is independent.  

 This session does not compete or replicate any of the five workshops approved by the IGF MAG, but attendance by any of such workshop organizers as observers is very welcomed.

NRIs respond to a very bottom up input from their communities, so they bring forward information that is unique to their own communities. 

Speakers/Resource persons
Speakers will be drawn from each NRI that is organizing because they included a session directly relevant to these topics. Designated speakers who are appointed by their NRI will be limited to 1-3, although others from their NRI may attend the session. Anyone speaking on behalf of the NRIs should be designated as such a speaker to present information about the discussions that took place within the NRI.  
The agreement of the NRIs in requesting these special sessions was to reflect work within the NRIs, and not to compete with workshops that are submitted into the MAG open call for workshops, thus, the focus will be on those NRIs that addressed this topic, and outreach to other NRIs that might be interested in these topics for NRI discussions for 2018. 

So far confirmed speakers:

- Mr. Hrvoje Lisicar, Croatia IGF, Faculty of Law in Zagreb University
- Mr Abdul-Hakeem Ajijola, Nigeria IGF, Chairman, Consultancy Support Services (CS2) Limited

Relevance of the issue
​Trust in the online world, often referred to as the Internet, but encompassing the World Wide Web and social media is being eroded by a growing lack of trust. 
Some are suggesting that they will not use online services  as they are filled with trolls, malware, viruses. Yet, the digitization of all applications means that citizens really need to use online applications, whether financial, government services, or business services. Many people get the majority of their “news” now, online, as they can’t afford, or can’t access traditional media.

Without credible online resources, the Internet and World Wide Web will erode as trusted sources - and that affects billions of users, who have been told that being online is where you find facts and truth not only about your own communities, but about the world at large. Historically, print media and broadcast media have been held to standards of fact checking. Is the online surrogate for “news” being held to any standard? And if not, why not? And, is the solution merely educating citizens to do their own due diligence? If so, what are the sources they should use for such information?   

Interventions/Engagement with participants (onsite and online)
Remote participation of the NRIs remote hubs will have priority: 
As some NRIs will not be able to send many of their participating community members to the IGF2017, some will be organizing remote hubs. For any NRI that either focused on this topic during their NRI, or has a strong interest, a priority for ensuring that they have a speaking slot during the Remote Participants section will be developed, using a request to speak submitted to the remote moderator. A deadline will be established for these formal requests, so that such speakers will be recognized and ensured a time slot, just as on site NRI presenters are. 
Additionally, there is an open mike segment for those attending on site, but who were not addressing this topic in 2017, but may bring perspectives or expertise to these topics. 

Geographical, Stakeholder and Gender Diversity
The NRIs themselves are reflective of geographical diversity, and at their national, subregional, or regional level reflect stakeholder diversity.  The speakers selected from the NRIs will be based on their individual criteria for expertise, experience, and support from their NRI to represent and engage on behalf of their NRI. Already, the NRIs co organizing bring geographical diversity. We will not require that the presenters come from any particular stakeholder group, or gender, as they are speaking on behalf of entities that reflect all three of these diversities. We will be encouraging diverse attendance from all NRIs to this session, and that will undoubtedly result in diversity across these three categories in our audience. 

Onsite moderator(s)
IGF-USA, Marilyn Cade
UK-IGF Nick, Wenban-Smith
Colombian IGF, Julian Casasbuenas

Online moderator(s)
Nigeria IGF Representative

Rapporteur(s)
Nataša Glavor, Croatia IGF
Dutch Youth IGF

Online participation logistics
NRIs that may be providing remote hubs should be invited to join this session and request a speaking slot ahead of time, to ensure that they are included equally with on site designated speakers
The session will use the WebEx remote participation tools provided by the IGF Secretariat.
Use of Social Media: 
In addition, this session will invite a dedicated person to tweet about the session and to follow any retweeting, or other tweeting about this session. 
The remote moderators should be seated in a prominent place, so that on site moderator(s) can easily see them. However, by designating a specific time slot for remote contributions from remote NRI hubs, we can ensure that remote speakers have equal contribution access. 
Two microphones should be available for use in inviting comments from the in-room participants.  

Discussion facilitation
To support the discussion within the NRI to NRI Exchange, each of the organizing NRIs will be invited to provide a one to two pager about their specific session on these topics which will be posted as “background information”. The moderator(s) will be invited to strive to have exchanges among the NRIs speaking, and those making remote comments and on site comments. 

...

Session Organizers
avatar for Julián Casasbuenas G.

Julián Casasbuenas G.

Director, Colnodo
MAG (IGF Multistakeholder Advisory Group) member since 2015 - civil society. Chemical Engineer, University of America 1984 - Bogotá Colombia, with more than twenty years of experience in environmental and information and communication technologies - ICTs.Director of Colnodo www.colnodo.apc.org... Read More →


Monday December 18, 2017 11:50 - 13:20
Room XXIII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

12:20

Regional Internet Registries (OF16)
The fundamental operation of the Internet relies on the combined efforts of key organizations within the Internet ecosystem. Among these organizations are the five Regional Internet Registries (RIRs), which are responsible for the regional management of Internet number resources (IPv6, IPv4 and ASNs). This session will focus on the role of the RIRs, IPv6 deployment and why the future growth of the Internet depends on it, the importance of accurate Internet number resource registration data, and the RIRs’ collaboration with law enforcement agencies (LEAs). There will also be an update on the recent independent Address Supporting Organization (ASO) review and, one-year on from the IANA Oversight Transition, the impact of the changes implemented will be discussed.  

Tag 1: #IPV6deployment
Tag 2: Critical Internet Resources
Tag 3:

Name(s) of Speaker(s):
Alan Barrett - AFRINIC CEO
Paul Wilson - APNIC CEO
Oscar Robles - LACNIC CEO
Axel Pawlik - RIPE NCC CEO


Name of Online Moderator: Pablo Hinojosa
Background Paper:
Past IGF Participation: No
Report Link:
Name: Mr. German Valdez
Organizational Affiliation: Number Resource Organization
 

Session Organizers
GV

German Valdez

Executive Secretary, Number Resource Organization


Monday December 18, 2017 12:20 - 13:20
Room XI - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

12:20

Council of Europe - Internet intermediaries: shared commitments and corporate responsibility (OF37)
The open forum will focus on dialogue with internet intermediaries concerning protection of human rights of internet users.

The scope of topics:

• fairness of the terms of service agreements and internal policies to be applied consistently and in conformity with due process safeguards,
• accountability and transparency of internet intermediaries,
• safeguards for privacy,
• addressing human rights' concerns of dataveillance and profiling, 
• safeguards for freedom of expression and right to information, 
• legality and effectiveness of monitoring and filtering mechanisms to detect unlawful content and content prohibited by international law.

Specific issues:

- Online moderation by intermediaries: in what cases must they restrict content? In what cases are they encouraged to act and according to what principles?

-  Intermediaries´ policies addressing hate speech and misinformation, including political propaganda: different policy models. Should intermediaries be more pro-active in addressing these problems? If so, where is the boundary for the service providers to restrict access to content?

-  Who decides what is fake and what is not?

- Tracking of users and profiling: what rules govern the policies of intermediaries? What rights do data subjects have? Do they know enough about them?

-  How intermediaries should inform users about their policies concerning the processing of personal data (such as collection, storing, aggregation and sharing) in order to ensure effective transparency? Are terms of service provisions clear enough for average users? Do they enable informed decision by the users?

-  What could be done to address the risks of dataveillance, invisible profiling and re-use of personal data - affecting informational self-determination? The roles of States, business stakeholders, technical community and civil society.

Tag 1: Human Rights Online
Tag 2: Freedom of Expression Online
Tag 3: Internet Technology

Names of Speakers:

Corina Călugăru, Ambassador, Committee of Ministers Thematic Co-ordinator on Information Policy, Council of Europe

Wolfgang Schulz, Hans-Bredow-Institut, University of Hamburg – Moderator

Panellists:

Luca Belli, Center for Technology & Society, FGV Rio de Janeiro

Andy O’Connell, Facebook

Marco Pancini, Google

Karmen Turk, Triniti Law Firm, University of Tartu


Name of Online Moderator:
Peter Kimpian, Council of Europe


Name of Session Organiser:
Małgorzata Pęk, Council of Europe 


Background Papers:

- Draft Recommendation of the Committee of Ministers to Member States on the roles and responsibilities of internet intermediaries:https://rm.coe.int/draft-recommendation-on-internet-intermediaries-7th-revised-version-/1680770c37

- Study on the human rights dimensions of automated data processing techniques (in particular algorithms) and possible regulatory implications: https://rm.coe.int/study-on-algorithmes-final-version/1680770cbc

- Recommendation CM/Rec(2014)6 of the Committee of Ministers to member states on a Guide to human rights for Internet users. User-friendly tool: https://www.coe.int/en/web/internet-users-rights/home

- Guidelines on the Protection of Individuals with regard to the Processing of Personal Data in a World of Big Data adopted by  Consultative Committee of the Convention 108: https://rm.coe.int/16806ebe7a
 

Session Organizers
MP

Małgorzata Pęk

Council of Europe


Monday December 18, 2017 12:20 - 13:20
Room XXVII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

12:20

Internet Rights and Principles Coalition
Join us for a live, open brainstorming session on the Educational Resource Guide to the Charter of Human Rights and Principles for the Internet.

The Resource Guide is a new project that develops cases, scenarios, subjects for debate, and focal points for capacity building and awareness raising around human rights and internet governance for international as well as local, community contexts. The full IRPC Charter is currently available in eight languages in booklet form. The Ten Internet Rights and Principles have been translated into 25 languages.

You can download Version 1 of the IRPC Charter Resource Guide, uploaded as a Presentation, below at the end of this page.

Version 2 of the Guide, with additional material, is currently available to view, and to comment on the IGF Dynamic Coalition Review Platform. This paper is an abbreviated form of the full Resource Guide, which is being presented as the IRPC Project Paper during the Dynamic Coalitions Main Session on Wednesday morning.

The aim of this meeting is to gather more ideas for cases, outreach and educational scenarios from around the world that can continue to populate the Resource Guide as we move it forward.

Bring your ideas, projects completed or ongoing, classroom and other sorts of activities that can illustrate issues arising from the 21 Articles that make up the IRPC Charter so we can include them in the next version of the Resource Guide.

All languages, regions, countries, and communities whose work speaks to human rights and principles for the internet as expressed in this charter are welcome. We also welcome issues that have not been included such as the environment, indigenous peoples' rights and emerging debates that resonate with the charter.

MEETING AGENDA

- Opening Remarks from the Moderator  - Marianne Franklin (co-Chair IRPC)

- Overview of Outreach and Educational work with the Charter in the MENA region - Hanane Boujemi (IRPC co-Chair) 

- Live brainstorm and input into the Resource Guide

- Next Steps

- Concluding Remarks

Rapporteur - Minda Moreira
Remote Participation Moderator - Sahajman Shrestha (IRP Coalition SC Member)

Session Organizers
avatar for Internet Rights and Principles Coalition

Internet Rights and Principles Coalition

Internet Rights & Principles Coalition / Goldsmiths (University of London, UK)
Follow us on Twitter @netrights #netrights



Monday December 18, 2017 12:20 - 13:20
Room XXIV - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

12:20

'Digital Switzerland' Strategy – Creating networked transformation (OF82)

The transformation process caused by increasing digitalization affects society, the economy and the state. Close cross-sectoral, interdisciplinary and networked collaboration is crucial for seizing the opportunities of digital transformation. Switzerland is in a strong position in this respect, thanks in particular to its multicultural nature, willingness to engage in dialogue and create a consensus, in addition to its pragmatic direct-democratic processes. In 2016, the Swiss Goverment formulated the 'Digital Switzerland' Strategy providing guidelines for government action and indicating where and how authorities, academia, the private sector, civil society and politics must work together in order to shape the transformation process for the benefit of everyone. To this end, the Government has launched a Dialogue on 'Digital Switzerland' where it assumes a moderator role. The highlight of the process is a national conference. Together with interested external stakeholders, the Government investigates what new measures are required for the further development of the strategy. Education, innovation, public services, sustainability, digital labor, cybersecurity and data policy were among the topics discussed at the first conference, which took place November 20, 2017.

We will present the governmental strategy and share highlights from the first conference. This will be coupled with a presentation of digitalswitzerland, a major cross-industry initative created to strenghen the country's position as a digital hub, as well as GenéveLab, the innovation laboratory of the Canton of Geneva. The Speakers will provide a short overview to open the discussion, followed by a moderated discussion with participants. Attendants are invited to discuss the prospects and challenges of tackling the dynamic transformation process in a coordinated bottom up approach.

Organizer: Federal Office of Communications Switzerland

Speakers

Mr Philipp Metzger, Director General of OFCOM Switzerland

Mr Edouard Bugion, EPFL and Digital Switzerland

Mr  Alexander Barclay, GenèveLab

Ms Roxana Radu, Chair ISOC-CH and Geneva Internet Plattform

Moderator

Jacques Beglinger, SwissHoldings

 

 


  


Session Organizers
LG

Lorenzo Garovi

Federal Office of Communications Switzerland



Monday December 18, 2017 12:20 - 13:20
Room XXI - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

12:20

The Future of Internet Identifiers: How the DNS will Function in a Smart Cyberspace? (WS48)

IGF 2017 WS #48

The Future of Internet Identifiers: How the DNS will Function in a Smart Cyberspace?

Proposer: Wolfgang Kleinwachter, University of Aarhus

Co-Proposer: Jörg Schweiger, DENIC

Session Format: Panel - 60 Min

Draft Program:

Opening Remarks (3 min.):

Jörg Schweiger, CEO DENIC

Introduction (7 min.):

Vint Cerf, CIE Google Inc.

Speakers (4x5 min.):

Christoph Blanchi, DONA Foundation

Marco Howening, RIPE NCC

Hans-Peter Dittler, ISOC Board

Ramy Ahmed Fathy, ITU-T SG 20

Commentators (4x3 min):

Nigel Hickson, ICANN

Xu Peixi, University of Bejing

Keith Drazek, VeriSign

Olga Cavalli, Buenos Aires South School of Internet Governance

Discussion (18 min.)

Moderator:

Wolfgang Kleinwächter, University of Aarhus

Remote Moderation:

Rainer Rodewald, Medienstadt Leipzig e.V.

Rapporteur:

Rainer Rodewald, Medienstadt Leipzig e.V.

Content of the Session:

For more than 30 years the Domain Name System (DNS) provided a first hand service for Internet identifiers. A domain name, an e-mail address and an IP number were the main identifiers which enabled communication among computers and people behind the computers. But with new applications and services, in particular related to (mobile) Apps, Industry 4.0 and the Internet of Things, the role of identifiers in the Internet Governance Ecosystem might face some change.

As Karl Auerbach has said: "It is not that the Domain Name System (DNS) is becoming less important as a technical way of mapping structured names into various forms of records, most often records containing IP addresses. Nor is the Domain Name System used less then heretofore. ... And national governments continue to believe that domain names are the holy grail of levers they can use to impose their views of right and proper behavior onto the internet. All of that remains. And it will remain. What is happening to DNS is more subtle: Domain names are slowly becoming invisible."

This process leads to a question which will be discussed in the workshop: Will we see the emergence of a new generation of Internet identifiers, in particular with regard to industry 4.0 and the Internet of Things and how the requirements for a new generation of Internet identifiers look like, how would they be determined and how would the issue of migration and coexistence be addressed to keep the global Internet interoperable and unfragmented?

The workshop will provide expertise mainly from the technical and business community but also from a governmental perspective (ICANNs GAC and ITU-T Study Group 20). And the interests of users will be also included into the debate as well as the perspective of developing countries.

Relevance of the Session:

The management of critical Internet resources, in particular Internet identifiers as domain names, has been in the spotlight of the Internet Governance debate in the last two decades. With the completion of the IANA transition and the emergence of new applications and services, related to industry 4.0, Internet of Things and Artificial Intelligence, the DNS is facing new challenges. This will have consequences both for the development of the domain name market as well as for related governmental policies. This is also a challenge for the technical community (to keep the Internet interoperable and non-fragmented) and will effect th interests of Internet end-users.

Online Participation:

We will reach out for an extended Online participation to the members of the ITU-T Study Group 20 as well as to members of the IGF-DC on IOT and other interested groups.

Discussion facilitation:

The moderator will not allow long individual presentations by invited speakeers. He will ask direct questions to the speakers on the podium and will include, as early as possible, the audience

 


Session Organizers
avatar for Wolfgang

Wolfgang

Commissioner, Global Commission on Stability in Cyberspace


Monday December 18, 2017 12:20 - 13:20
Room XII - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

13:00

Opportunities for labour markets through online education
Presenter: Mikhail Komarov

Monday December 18, 2017 13:00 - 13:20
IGF Village Area

13:15

IGF Newcomers and Youth Track: Private sector and Technical Community at the IGF: What is the role of these stakeholder groups within the IGF and ways for your engagement?
IGF is based on a multistakeholder model. It allows all stakeholders to equally work together: Governments, Civil Society, Private Sector and Technical Community! The Newcomers&Youth Track will explain what is the role of all these stakeholders.

During this informal gathering, that we call the Knowledge Cafe, learn what is the role of Private Sector and Technical Community within the IGF and ways for your engagement?

Come and spend time with representatives of many organizations involved in the IGF!

Monday December 18, 2017 13:15 - 23:30
Room IX - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

13:25

Privacy for Kids: the booklet
Presenter: Maryant Fernandez Perez

Monday December 18, 2017 13:25 - 13:45
IGF Village Area

13:30

Content Regulation in the Digital Age: A Conversation with the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression
Sponsor:  Global Network Initiative

Participants:
David Kaye, UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression
Emma Llanso, Director, Free Expression Project, Center for Democracy and Technology
Chinmayi Arun, Research Director, Centre for Communication Governance, National Law University, Delhi 
Nicole Karlebach, Global Head, Business and Human Rights, Oath
Jason Pielemeier, Policy Director, Global Network Initiative 

Monday December 18, 2017 13:30 - 15:00
Room XXII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

13:30

Seed Alliance Awards Ceremony

The Seed Alliance is a grants and awards program that seeks to promote Internet Development in the Global South supporting a variety of stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean, Asia Pacific and Africa.

The main purpose of this session is to highlight the contributions from innovators across the global south to support Internet development, innovations that shape our digital future.

6 projects awarded by the ISIF Asia, FRIDA and FIRE Africa programs will be introduced through video presentations about their work, as follows: 

Duncan Macintosh, CEO APNIC FOUNDATION, introductory remarks about how the Seed Alliance contributes to the SDGs. Duncan will present the award to:

  • ISIF Asia 2017 Internet for development Award Winner: Yayasan Peta Bencana for the project "Democratizing Decision Support: PetaBencana.id Platform for Equitable Disaster Resilience", Indonesia

Laura Kaplan, Development and Cooperation Manager at LACNIC will talk about Gender and Technology, and Seed Alliance's contribution to closing the gendered digital divide. Laura will present the awards to:

  • FRIDA 2017 Award for WOMEN IN TECHNOLOGY: Coding Rights, Brazil
  • FRIDA 2017 Award for INTERNET AND TECHNOLOGIES FOR COMMUNITIES: Universidad del Oriente for Armonía, Cuba

Vymala Thuron from AFRINIC to talk on the benefits and impact of community projects and why it is important for the Seed Alliance to pursue the work. Vymala will present the awards to:

  • FIRE 2017 Award on ICT for Development: EduAir for EduAirBox, Cameroon
  • FIRE 2017 Award on Internet Development: African Renewable Energy Distributor (ARED) for The Last Mile Connectivity, Rwanda
  • FIRE 2017 Award on Internet for social inclusion: Maendeleo Foundation for The Mobile Solar Computer Classroom, Uganda
Remarks from the Seed Alliance partners Laurent Elder (IDRC) and Raul Echeberria (ISOC) will follow. 

Alan Barret, CEO of AFRINIC will be closing the event.

 


Session Organizers
avatar for Sylvia Cadena

Sylvia Cadena

Head of Programs / ISIF Asia coordinator, APNIC Foundation
Internet development | Capacity building | Funding for innovation / ISIF Asia grants and awards


Monday December 18, 2017 13:30 - 15:00
Room XXVI - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

13:50

SpeakUp Barometer - How to assess digital participation
Presenters: Steffen Leidel, Julius Endert

Monday December 18, 2017 13:50 - 14:10
IGF Village Area

14:15

‘Friends of IGF’ Project
Presenter: Flávio Wagner

Monday December 18, 2017 14:15 - 14:35
IGF Village Area

14:40

15:00

OPENING CEREMONY

During the Opening Ceremony, welcoming remarks will be given by:

o   Ms. Doris Leuthard, President of the Swiss Confederation

o   Mr. Antonio Guterres, UN Secretary-General (Video-message)

o   Mr. Liu Zhenmin, Under-Secretary-General, UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs

o   Mr. Michael Møller, Director-General of the United Nations Office at Geneva

o   Mr. Houlin Zhao, Secretary-General, ITU

o   Mr. Frank La Rue, Assistant Director-General Communication & Information, UNESCO

o   Mr. Pierre Maudet, Conseiller d’Etat, Genève

o   Mr. Rémy Pagani, Maire de la ville de Genève

The Opening Ceremony will start and conclude with a cultural performance.

 


Monday December 18, 2017 15:00 - 16:00
Assembly Hall - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

16:00

HIGH LEVEL THEMATIC SESSION 'SHAPING OUR FUTURE DIGITAL GLOBAL GOVERNANCE'

High Level Session of the UN Internet Governance Forum (IGF) 2017

Shaping our future digital global governance”

Monday, 18 December 2017, 4pm – 6pm

Assembly Hall, Palais des Nations, Geneva, Switzerland

*Participants are advised seating in the Assembly Hall is limited; all those interested in attending this session should secure their seats in the preceding opening ceremony.*

 

Theme: Digitisation provides unique opportunities for growth and development. But in recent times, the Internet has also been associated with growing challenges that call for a better coordinated global digital governance system. Pooling the strengths of different stakeholders – governments, private sector, technical community and civil society – is essential in any such effort. This session aims to discuss the pressing matters relating to digitisation and to the future evolution of the global digital governance framework. Potential gaps in the current digital governance system would be part of the conversation and suggestions for improving global cooperation among all stakeholders can be developed.

 

Host Chair: Ms. Doris Leuthard, President of the Swiss Confederation

 

UN Representative: Mr. Liu Zhenmin, Under-Secretary-General, UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs and UNSG representative

 

Format: Moderated interactive roundtable discussion

 

Moderator: Ms. Nathalie Ducommun, Talk Master of Swiss Television RTS

 

Remote Moderator: Mr. Jovan Kurbalija, Head of Geneva Internet Platform

 

Policy questions:

The session will discuss the following policy questions:

  • What is your vision for the global digital governance in 10 years? 
  • Where do you see the main challenges?
  • Which opportunities could be seized?
  • What are the roles and responsibilities of the different stakeholders?

 

Agenda:

  • First general question “What is your vision for the global digital governance in 10 years?” and 2-minute inputs from each speaker (around 30 minutes in total).
  • Subsequently, 30-40 minutes for interactive debate, which will consider the other policy questions and be focused and respond to a short number of theses shared with the speakers and the audience at the start of the session.
  • Lastly, 40-50 minutes for open debate with audience, of which the first 20 minutes will be reserved for 2-minute inputs from other VIP speakers in the audience (“VIP mic”).
  • Wrap-up with tweet-like final remarks from panelists (5-10 minutes)

 

Speakers:

  • Ms. Doris Leuthard, President of the Swiss Confederation
  • Mr. Liu Zhenmin, Under-Secretary-General, UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs and UNSG representative
  • Mr. Houlin Zhao, Secretary-General, ITU
  • Ms. Mariya Gabriel, Commissioner for Digital Economy and Society, European Commission
  • Mr. Hasanul Haq Inu, Minister of Information, Bangladesh
  • Ms. Anriette Esterhuysen, Director of Global Policy and Strategy, APC
  • Ms. Kathy Brown, President and Chief Executive Officer, ISOC
  • Mr. Eric Loeb, Senior Vice President International External and Regulatory Affairs, AT&T  
  • Mr. Vinton G. Cerf, Vice President and Chief Internet Evangelist, Google
  • Ms. Lakshmi Puri, Deputy Executive Director, UN Women
  • Mr. Masahiko Tominaga, Vice-Minister for Policy Coordination (International Affairs), Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications (MIC), Japan


Monday December 18, 2017 16:00 - 18:00
Assembly Hall - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)
 
Tuesday, December 19
 

09:00

EU Delegation to the IGF & Youth IGF Movement (OF78)
The main idea of the present proposal for an Open Forum is to share with the IGF multi-stakeholder community the concept and the outcomes of the Youth IGF Movement meetings that took place around the world. 

The format of the Open Forum is intended to be a debate between the young from the Youth IGF Movement and the Information Society experts namely the members of the EU Delegation to the IGF, as well as the representatives of the Asia-Pacific community, African countries and Latin America.

We would like also to invite the leaders of the private sector for discussion with these young leaders. The Open Forum welcomes the representatives of other youth initiatives to enagage in an inclusive dialogue with the leaders of the IGF community. 


Four main topics have been identified by the young for discussion:

* Fake news online

* GPDR and the impact on EU and non-EU young citizens  

* Blockchain technology and the need for new digital skills:  young entrepreneurship

* Raising awareness of the young on internet safety and their responsibilities: the role of the young

*****

The purpose of this Open Forum is to allow the voice of young people to be heard by Information Society experts on issues related to internet governance and to help young people to take an active part in decision-making processes. 

One of the focus points will also be to see how the recommendations which emerge from the present Open Forum can be taken into consideration at national and regional levels and what needs to be done to achieve this. 
Tag 1: #accessandinclusion
Tag 2: #youth
Tag 3: #InternetSafety
Name(s) of Speaker(s):

* With the participation of Mrs Mariya GABRIEL, 
EU Commissioner for Digital Economy and Society

* Key foreword: Mr Michał BONI, MEP, EPP, Chair of the Delegation

& Mr George SADOWSKY, ICANN Board

*Message from:  Mrs Julie WARD, MEP, S&D & Mrs Jacqueline BEAUCHERE, Microsoft (tbc)

*Key invitees: EP Delegation to IGF, Moctar YEDALY - AUC, Mihail KOMAROV- Academia, HSE

*Young Leaders, representatives of the: Youth IGF Movement  &  Asia Pacific Youth IGF (among others)


Name of Online Moderator: Mr Goncalo ROQUE FONSECA

Background Paper: short_note.pdf
Past IGF Participation: Yes
Report Link: http://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/content/igf-2016-day-1-room-10-of53-youth-igf-eu-delegation
Name: Ms. Yuliya Morenets
Organizational Affiliation: EU Delegation & TaC-Together against Cybercrime International
 

Session Organizers
avatar for Yuliya Morenets

Yuliya Morenets

Representative, TaC-­‐Together against Cybercrime International
Today, Yuliya leads non-profit organisation TaC-Together against Cybercrime International, which works on the empowerment of users in the field of safe and responsible Internet, child online protection and the Internet Governance issues. | Yuliya is an expert belonging to a number... Read More →


Tuesday December 19, 2017 09:00 - 10:00
Room XXIII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

09:00

The new Corporate Digital Responsibility; duties of care and the Internet of Things (OF40)
The Ministry of Security and Justice of The Netherlands hosts the secretariat and co-chairs the Cyber Security Council of The Netherlands (CSR). The Ministry files this application in order to present on a body of work concerning duties of care for the ICT industry and to discuss the recommendations on a global scale. You find the report attached to this application.

In April 2017 the CSR, an independent, high-level, public-private-academic, advisory body to the Dutch Cabinet, published the document ‘Every business has duties of care in the field of cybersecurity’. The document presents a strong case why companies using ICT have duties of care, for itself, its customers and its environment. They point companies towards actions that ensure viable cyber security measures and solutions. The document is a product of joint national public-private-academic workgroups.

The number of devices connecting to the Internet (IoT) run into the billions and counting. The concerns around security rise as well. IoT touches our personal security. The call for duties of care are rising, with some stating that the opportunity for self-regulatory measures is about over. However, production and distribution are global. Hence industry’s call for harmonisation of (self-)regulatory measures. This Open Forum acknowledges the need for global harmonisation and brings together global experts in order to identify current best practices.

The Ministry will actively invite participants from different stakeholder groups and regional background, e.g. representatives of governments, industry, the military, regulators, civil society and the Internet industry to debate the current state of affairs pertaining duties of care, based on the CSR study. Participants will also be invited to share their views on ways forward. Interaction with the Dynamic Coalition on IoT and the Best Practice Forum on Cyber Security is foreseen.
Tag 1: Cyber Security
Tag 2: Internet of Things
Tag 3: Duties to care
Name(s) of Speaker(s):
Mr. Dick Schoof, National Coordinator Counter-Terrorism and Security
Ms. Elly van den Heuvel, secretary to the Cyber Security Council
Representatives of: the European Commission, governments, industry, Internet related organisations, civil society , (TBC)

Name of Online Moderator: Mr. Thijl Klerkx
Background Paper: Cyber Security Council - Duties of Care - IGF 2017.pdf
Past IGF Participation: No
Report Link:
Name: Ms. DE RIDDER STEPHANIE
Organizational Affiliation: MINISTRY OF SECURITY AND JUSTICE - THE NETHERLANDS
 

Session Organizers

Tuesday December 19, 2017 09:00 - 10:00
Room IX - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

09:00

Digitalization and International Trade (OF48)

The shift to a digital economy, the rise of the Internet and the opportunities provided by global electronic commerce increasingly influence sustainable development. In its Information Economy Report 2017: Digitalization, Trade and Development, UNCTAD stresses that we are only seeing the beginning of digital transformations that will have major transformational effects. They will create significant opportunities for developing countries but also major challenges. For example, as more and more cross-border economic transactions go digital, it becomes increasingly important to bring the trade community and the Internet Governance community together.

The purpose of this Open Forum is three-fold: 1) to introduce IGF participants to UNCTAD's work on e-commerce and the digital economy; 2) to present the key messages from the Information Economy Report 2017; and 3) to discuss ways to initiate dialogue between the Internet and trade policy communities, particularly with respect to addressing the complex challenges of data localization and barriers to cross-border data flows.

Tag 1: Internet Economy
Tag 2: e-commerce
Tag 3: Multistakeholder Cooperation

Session Moderator: Torbjörn Fredriksson, Chief, ICT Policy Section, UNCTAD

09:00 Welcome remarks and highlights of the Information Economy Report 2017

 Mr. Torbjörn Fredriksson, Chief, ICT Analysis Section, UNCTAD

09:15 Linking the Internet and Trade Policy Communities

Mr. William J. Drake, International Fellow and Lecturer, University of Zurich

09:30 Multistakeholder Responses

H.E. Mr. Julian Braithwaite, UK Permanent Representative to the UN and WTO in Geneva

Mr. Tarek Kamel, Senior Vice President, ICANN

Ms. Anriette Esterhuysen, Director, Global Policy and Strategy, the Association for Progressive Communications

Ms. Marietje Schaake, Member of European Parliament from the Netherlands

09:55 Closing remarks

Mr. Torbjörn Fredriksson, UNCTAD


Background Paper: IGF 2017 Open Forum proposal Digitalization and International Trade.pdf
Past IGF Participation: Yes
Report Link:
Name: Mr. Torbjörn Fredriksson
Organizational Affiliation: UNCTAD
 

Session Organizers
CC

Claudia Contreras

Economic Affairs Officer, UNCTAD
avatar for Torbjorn Fredriksson

Torbjorn Fredriksson

Chief, ICT Policy Section, UNCTAD
Mr. Torbjörn Fredriksson is the Chief of the ICT Policy Section at the UN Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD). He is responsible for the Information Economy Report (IER) and UNCTAD’s work on ICT sector development, ICT Policy Reviews, e-commerce development and ICT measurement... Read More →


Tuesday December 19, 2017 09:00 - 10:00
Room XXVII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

09:00

DC on Platform Responsibility

The Dynamic Coalition on Platform Responsibility (DCPR) is a multistakeholder group aimed at stimulating discussion on the roles and responsibilities of online platforms in the online ecosystem, in particular with regard to human rights protection.

Session panellist will debate the results of their research, which have been included in the book Platform Regulations: How Platforms are Regulated and How they Regulate Us” constituting the Official 2017 Outcome of the DCPR. This volume explores challenges and opportunities posed by the platformisation of our economy and, more generally, our society. The book features eleven contribution on topics ranging from the human rights dimension, to data governance and new roles of platforms calling for new solutions. It also includes the Recommendations on Terms of Service and Human Rights, whose development was facilitated by the DCPR, through a multistakeholder participatory process.  

Free hard copies of the book will be distributed at the DCPR session, which will be opened by the keynote remarks of:

  • David Kaye, UN Special Rapporteur for the Protection and Promotion of the Right to Freedom of Opinion and Expression
  • Julia Reda, Member of the European Parliament and Vice-Chair of the Greens/European Free Alliance

An interactive debate will follow, stimulated by the authors of the analyses featured in Platform Regulations. The panel will be composed by:

  • Luca Belli and Nicolo Zingales, DCPR coordinators
  • Krzysztof Garstka and David Erdos, University of Cambridge
  • Krisztina Huszti-Orban, University of Essex
  • Emily Laidlaw,  University of Calgary
  • Judith Herzog and Lofred Madzou, French Digital Council
  • Maryant Fernandez Perez, European Digital Rights
  • Natasha Tusikov, York University
  • Rolf Weber, University of Zurich

Session Organizers
avatar for Luca Belli

Luca Belli

Head of Internet Governance, Center for Technology and Society at FGV
Luca Belli, PhD is Senior Researcher at the Center for Technology and Society (CTS) of Fundação Getulio Vargas (FGV), where he heads the Internet Governance project. Luca is also associated researcher at Centre de Droit Public Comparé of Paris 2 University. For those who do not... Read More →
avatar for Nicolo Zingales

Nicolo Zingales

Sussex Law School
- Lecturer in competition and information law at Sussex Law School | - Affiliate scholar at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society | - Research associate of the Tilburg Institute for Law, Technology and Society (TILT) | - Extramural fellow of the Tilburg Law and Economic... Read More →


Tuesday December 19, 2017 09:00 - 10:00
Room XXII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

09:00

The future of Internet governance: submarine cables and global interconnectivity (WS128)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Florence Poznanski
Proposer's Organization: Internet Without Borders 
Co-Proposer's Name: Mr. Felix Blanc
Co-Proposer's Organization: Internet Without Borders
Co-Organizers:
Mr.,Jonas, VALENTE, Civil Society, Intervozes (Brazil)
Mr., Diego VICENTIN, Technical Community, Univesidade Estadual de Campinas (Brazil)


Session Format: Panel - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: Brazil
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Co-Proposer:
Country: France
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speaker:  Peter Micek
Speaker: Roxana Radu
Speaker: Félix Blanc
Speaker: Veridiana Alimonti

Content of the Session:
Submarine cables and Internet exchange points play a crucial role in interconnecting national and international networks into a complex network of submarine highways. Estimates show that a 10% increase in broadband penetration brings around a 1.4% increase in terms of economic growth. But interconnection costs remain very high in developing countries, especially in Africa, due to various factors including national telecom monopolies, lack of backbone infrastructures or barriers to market access. In 2005, the Geneva Working Group on Internet Governance urged international agencies to report on interconnection costs and fund “initiatives that advance connectivity, IXPs, and local content for developing countries”. Since then, several organizations have met the challenge and recommended to promote the liberalization of access to international gateways.

Latin-America and Africa, and generally all the BRICS, are passing through a request of huge transformation of their infrastructure, which is materializing with the construction of new submarine cables, satellites, backbones and inter-exchange points, linking Brazil, for example, to Europa and Africa. But without a favorable context on transparency, jurisdiction and governance, the impacts of new internet infrastructures can be reduced.

This panel aims to build up an overview on these topics. What outcomes shall additional submarine cables have on Internet affordability in Latin America and BRICS countries, and how to maximize them? How could sea cables consortia provide greater transparency on their functioning
and tariff policy? How can these changes take place with a national legislation on telecommunication infrastructure that reduces public regulation, like in Brazil? Are international gateways eligible to become “collective goods, socially produced, and governed as common-pool
resources” ? How to reduce the high dependency of some countries to international broadband, especially in Africa and Latin America?

Our round-table might bring sea cables consortia and Internet broadband experts face-to-face with frontline activists, universities and a civil society coalition to think of a way to bring innovative solutions on transparency, affordability and governance.

This panel is the result of a project in progress since 2016 which was launched at the RightsCon in Brussels in March 2017. It will be the presentation of the state of the current research.

Relevance of the Session:
Our workshop on the governance of submarine cables will deal with the thematic of (global) inter-connectivity. We will emphasize on innovative participatory and economical mechanisms for sharing the costs and benefits of Internet infrastructures that are crucial for the
future of global inter-connectivity: submarine cables and IXPs. We will address key issues of Internet governance including that transparency,
affordability, neutrality and open access.In this order, we understand that the panel has a central place in the debate of the Future of Internet. 

Tag 1: Interconnection and Price Regulation
Tag 2: BRICS
Tag 3: Internet Governance

Interventions:
Confirmed interventions:

- Roxana Radu, Technical Communitiy, DiploFoundation, Switzerland: Balance and perspective of the outcome of submarine cables in the international legislation and governance of Internet

- Peter Micek, Civil Society, Global Policy & Legal Counsel, Access Now, New York: Internet Shutdown and censorship, the urgency of new Internet gateways

- Veridiana Alimonti, Civil Society, Lawyer and member of the director council of Intervozes (Master's degree in Economic Law from the University of São Paulo Law School.), Brazil: Digital Rights and regional infrastructures, the ecosystem of relationship between providers, users and citizens in Latin América

- Felix Blanc, Technical Community, Resercher, fellow at Fundação Getulio Vargas/Centro de Tecnologia e SociedadeCivil Society (Brazil), member of Internet Without Borders : The ELLA Submarine Cables and his innovative governance model

* Debate, questions and further research perspectives (30 minutes)Diversity:

The panel aims to represent a diversity between continents with a strong representation of speakers from Latin America and Africa. Moreover, many organizers are participating in the IGF for the first time. Internet without borders is led by women, activists for equal rights and greater representation in the institutions, a great place will be given so that gender equality be guaranteed in the final composition of the panel.

Onsite Moderator: Florence Poznanski
Online Moderator: Felix Blanc
Rapporteur: Diego Vicentin 

Discussion facilitation:
The panel aims to present the preliminary results of a research on the governance of submarine cables. In this sense, it is divided into two fundamental parts. The exhibition by the speakers and the exchanges with the participants.

We want to facilitate the exchanges in order to produce a constructive return on the exhibitions to improve the work and propose the new issues of research. We will ask our speakers to highlight specific questions, clear perspectives for them to serve as a point of reference for the public.

The questions selections will follow theese goals.

Online Participation:
The panel will last 1h30. The first 50 minutes will be reserved to the interventions of the panelists and then 40 minutes of questions and debate. Those wishing to intervene must register during the exhibitions, explaining whether their intervention is a question, a contribution or a critique. Depending on the number of participants in the room and the number of people accompanying the on-line panel, a key will be defined for allocating the number of on-line and onsite interventions between the two moderators. Interventions of the participants online will be expressed live via webcam if the Internet connection allows, by sending audio to the moderator or by reading text by the moderator. 



Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: No

Link to Report: 

Additional Reference Document Link:



 


Session Organizers
avatar for Florence Poznanski

Florence Poznanski

Head of Brazil Desk, Internet Sem Fronteiras - Brasil
Head of Brazilian Desk, Internet Without Borders


Tuesday December 19, 2017 09:00 - 10:30
Room XII - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

09:00

IG Grassroots initiatives, Youth leaders on the table (WS6)

Proposer's Name: Mr. Shreedeep Rayamajhi
Proposer's Organization: RayZnews
Co-Organizers:
Civil Society, Learn IG

Session Format: Panel - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: Nepal
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Confrimed Speakers

Shreedeep Rayamajhi – Media -Learn IG - Nepal
Aris Ignacio-Academia - College of Information Technology – Philippines
Maheeshwara Kirindigoda- Internet safety project – Private Sector -Sri Lanka
David NG- eHelp Association – Technical – Hongkong 
Burna Santos- Brazil 
jianne.soriano-Net Mission 


Speaker: 
Shreedeep Rayamajhi

Relevance of the Session:
During the workshop we would be highlighting the personal experience, and need of technology in terms of youth awareness and how community collaborative project like Learn IG can helps in bridging the gaps. Most of the times People are awarded fellowship but when they go back they limit themselves to the limitation of their reach. This session will explore the possibility of how leaders can use their knowledge, learning and expertise to help others raise awareness specially with youth and community.

Content of the Session:
The collaborative Community Development Program Learn Internet Governance Program is a Dynamic platform of getting information which focuses in open knowledge sharing method. During the IGF 2017 we want to share our experience and help promote the concept to further enlarge the group of internet leaders with the possibilities of what can be done at individual level. Especially in developing and least developed and developing nations where there is crisis of funding this concept can help people to network and do something credible in terms of spreading the awareness and knowledge that they have. They can use the available resources in utilizing their own knowledge and network to create a better means of communication channel that can empower the youths and share knowledge at local level without the support of any funding. It can further multiply and can be a very effecting means of capacity building as well. Right now with Learn IG, we have a simple website and forum for communication and collaboration. We are further planning to network and grow in terms of how and what can be done. This year we also published a report on Internet development status of developing countries in AP region. 

We want to promote the concept of networking and knowledge sharing at individual level of youth internet leaders. Promoting and empowering youths as our basic objective. 

As today in most parts of the world, it is very costly to participate in forums like IGF and other IG awareness course these kinds of informational tool can be handy for communication and information dissemination. Our main focus are: 

1. To promote easy and effective mean of communication 
2. To promote next generation leadership in developing countries 
3. To build network among internet leaders 
4. To create an open knowledge sharing platform 
5. Utilization of local resources 
6. Issues and challenges of Youth leadership in IG process 
7. Communication and collaboration opportunity 
I strongly believe today when there is a trend of people who are just traveling as a holiday to all these internet events where with Learn IG we want to make a point that things can be done with strong will and knowledge to make change it is possible and we youths believe in creating a better, safe and equal internet for all.

Tag 1: Youth Engagement
Tag 2: Access and Diversity
Tag 3: Digital Literacy

Interventions:

An interactive dialogue with questions and answers with all the participating leaders and exchanging information in an open discussion.

we have selected all the speakers from a young group on the regional and on the basis of their work involvement with Internet governance issues. 
We have asked them to prepare a presentation or any form of information that they can share it on the table. 


Rapporteur: Shreedeep Rayamajhi

Online Participation:
The online participation will be carried out by online moderator and we will be taking in LIVE question from the online particiaption as well as our participats present . 

Discussion facilitation:
As mentioned above we have clearly defined the topic and have circulated our speakers about the topic. we have also asked them to get their information as organized as possible. We are also working in bringing in case study specifically related to individual projects and further other details of collaboration and communication. Likewise, we will also be focusing on the real time data and internet penetration rate of countries just in case to give an idea about where the global internet is moving. It will give the discussion a new angle for discussion during the introduction session.

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: No
Link to Report: https://www.slideshare.net/ShreedeepRayamajhi/internet-development-repor...
http://learninternetgovernance.blogspot.com/p/events.html

Speakers Profile : 

Burna Santos – Civil Society-Brazil
For the past three years I have worked as a legal advisor at the Presidency of Brazil, covering Human Rights and Internet Governance issues and taking part in interesting discussions on the Internet in Brazil in past years like the Marco Civil da Internet (Brazilian Civil Rights Framework for the Internet) and Data Protection bill draft. I am also an alumna of the Brazilian School of Internet Governance, a CGI.br fellow at the 9th Latin America and Caribbean Regional Preparatory Meeting for the Internet Governance Forum, an ICANN Fellow during ICANN58, and a very proud member of the Internet Society Special Interest Group Youth Observatory.

Inspired by my Youth Observatory colleagues and as a young person who is interested in policy-making processes, building a safe online environment for young women is one of my highest priorities. Because of this, I joined the IGF's Best Practice Forum on Gender & Access as a voluntary investigator and co-authored the "Young Latin American Women Declaration: Enabling access to empower young women and build a feminist Internet Governance."

Aris Ignacio Academics -Philipnes Aris Ignacio is the Dean of the College of Information Technology at Southville International School and Colleges, where he teaches different disciplines in Information Technology and Computer Science.

He is also involved with ICANN through APRALO and ISOC. He is the President of the Internet Society's Philippines Chapter, as well as a member of the At-Large structure. He majorly involved with APrIGF youth IGF and other regional initiative.

 Maheeshwara Kirindigoda Private Sector SriLanka 
Maheeshwara Kirindigoda is an Activist in the filed of ICT I am being privilege to hold the responsibilities as the Secretary to the Internet Society Sri Lanka chapter, President of the Chamber of ICT, Chairmen IGF Sri Lanka organizing committee and Secretary to the Central Province Export Chamber. He runs the internet saftey program in Sri Lanka and has been associated with organizing the Sri Lankan IGF. 

Agenda: 

During the workshop, we will be highlighting the personal experience, initiative and skills of youth for bridging the gaps of IG. We are also planning to highlight the problems with in the awareness campaign and youth involvement in the internet governance process and their role for future.
The moderator will further make the session interactive  with questions and answers making the session more inclusion. Participants can ask their questions by raising their hand. 
here are major agendas. 

  • Youth on the Table
  • Leadership opportunity for youth
  • Youth Participation in Internet Governance Process
  • Youth fellowship and scope
  • Youth Awareness and communication
  • Collaborative awareness concept
  • Awareness program and its sustainability
  • Funding option available
  • Indicators and players of IG
  • Role of fellowship and scholars

We are keeping last 10 minutes to make sure we answer all the questions including online.  

 

...

Session Organizers
avatar for Shreedeep Rayamajhi

Shreedeep Rayamajhi

ICT4D consultant, RayZnews
I an enthusiastic learner who believes in one world one internet concept. IGF for me is a learning and networking platform for creating better awareness of bridging technology and policy gaps in between the developed and developing world. We have to give space for unheard voices and... Read More →



Tuesday December 19, 2017 09:00 - 10:30
Room XI - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

09:00

Emerging challenges for data protection in Latin American countries (WS113)

Proposer's Name: Mr. Hartmut Glaser
Proposer's Organization: Brazilian Internet Steering Committee (CGI.br)
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Jamila Venturini
Co-Proposer's Organization: Brazilian Network Information Center (NIC.br)
Co-Organizers: Romina Garrido, female, Chile, Datos Protegidos, civil society


Session Format: Round Table - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: Brazil
Stakeholder Group: Technical Community

Co-Proposer:
Country: Brazil
Stakeholder Group: Technical Community

Content of the Session:
The workshop aims at discussing the challenges for the regulation of personal data protection in Latin America and identifying solutions and innovations developed in the different countries in an exercise that can feedback into the ongoing regulatory discussions in the region. Besides dealing with traditional data protection issues such as (i) the concept of personal and anonymous data; (ii) consent and other legal bases for data processing; (iii) international transfer of personal data; (iv) data protection authority, etc., the workshop will discuss – from a regional perspective – emerging topics such as (i) privacy by design; (ii) the right to be forgotten; (iii) algorithm accountability; and (iii) the complexity inherent to data flows exchange between private and public entities in processing personal data. Such an approach is suggested as a way of shifting the focus of the debates on the topic from the perspective of the Western European countries and the United States to a Latin American one, in an attempt to broaden the discussion and include the particular challenges of developing countries and young democracies, in a moment in which data protection has become centerpiece of the policy agenda. The general outline of the session includes a high level presentation of the regional situation regarding data protection and will be followed by two rounds of short interventions from invited commentators that will delve into particular realities and concrete cases from selected countries. The floor will be opened for the interventions of interested participants from the audience, who will help understanding the regional context and pointing to best practices and ways forward to advance the regulatory efforts on data protection.

Relevance of the Session:
In the past years, data protection has increasingly become a central Internet governance issue. Despite being in the agenda of several IGFs, the subject has gained more relevance and nuances that go from privacy and security issues to freedom of expression and information ones. The advance of new technologies that allow the processing of greater amounts of personal data and the emergence of the so-called Internet of Things (sometimes associated to initiatives on “smart cities”) have at the same time increased the power and information asymmetry between companies and users (and sometimes even between companies and States) and the challenges for data protection regulation.

The Latin American context regarding data protection is diverse: according to the DLA Piper’s Data Protection Laws of the World Handbook, most countries in the region have a moderate level of protection. That is the case, for instance, of Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Mexico, Peru and Uruguay. Brazil, Honduras and Venezuela, on the other hand, are classified as having a limited protection, while Argentina is the only country classified as having a robust level of protection in the region.

Despite the relevance of the topic for Latin American countries, international debates on data protection, especially in the regulatory field, have had a strong focus on the tensions between the policy orientations of European countries and the United States. The innovation of this workshop will be to gather key actors in a multistakeholder perspective to discuss the challenges of data protection from a regional point of view, trying to identify its particularities, as well as solutions and best practices that emerge in specific contexts. The discussion is timely considering that several countries in the region are discussing either the adoption of comprehensive personal data protection laws (e.g. Brazil, Ecuador, etc.) or the modernization of their existing frameworks (e.g. Argentina, Chile, Mexico, etc.). In this sense, it can at the same time receive inputs and contribute to local debates on the subject. The session was also designed to have a pedagogical character by providing clarification to local stakeholders on the role and limits of data protection and to advance in identifying and preventing setbacks in freedom of expression and access to information – a common fear in a region that has historically been marked by several authoritarian regimes.

Any serious discussion about “our digital future” should take into account the role of big data and the impacts of the processing of immense amounts of personal information collected by private and state agents. Considering that a great part of the “next billion” users to be connected to the Internet are located in the developing world (especially Africa and Latin America), it is crucial to reframe the discussions on data protection to assure that the future of the new “digital citizens” includes safeguards and the respect for their human rights.

Tag 1: Data protection
Tag 2: Human Rights
Tag 3: Internet Economy

Interventions:
The proposed format will allow the interaction of several invited experts that represent distinct countries, sectors and visions towards the challenges and opportunities for data protection in Latin America. There will be two moderators that will make a quick introduction of the session and who will be followed by a keynote from a representative from an intergovernmental organization. A first round of interventions will be introduced by the moderators with an orienting question about the situation of data protection in selected countries of the region (Argentina, Brazil and Mexico). After this first round of quick presentations, the members of the roundtable that did not present comments will answer moderator’s questions on specific cases from their countries (Chile, Colombia and Peru). Finally, the floor will be opened for the interventions and questions of the participants in the audience, who will be able to bring their concerns and cases and interact with all panelists that then will give their final considerations. Bellow is a preliminary list of proposed moderators and participants indicating the ones that are still to be confirmed.

Moderators:
Carolina Aguerre, female, Argentina, University of San Andres, academia
Luiz Fernando Castro, male, Brazil, CGI.br, government

Introduction (keynote):
Danilo Doneda, male, Brazil, UERJ, academia

First round:
Alejandro Pisanty, male, Mexico, ISOC, technical community
Marcel Leonardi, male, Brazil, Google Brazil, private sector
Romina Garrido, female, Chile, Datos Protegidos, civil society

Second round:
Amalia Toledo, female, Colombia, Fundación Karisma, civil society
Martin Borgiolli, male, Peru, Hiperderecho, civil society

Instead of long interventions from few speakers, the workshop will be organized in three “rounds” and the time of the interventions by each panelist is planned to be as short as possible (5’ each and 10’ to the representative of the intergovernmental organization). This format will assure broad participation of representatives from several countries in the region in order to identify the current situation of Latin America with regards to data protection and the main concerns each country presents. And still reserve enough time for the audience and online participants to intervene. Each moderator will guide one “round” of the discussion, to add more dynamics to the conversations. 

Diversity:
The diversity of the workshop is assured from the selection of moderators: two moderators, from both genders, different countries and different stakeholder groups. The first round of interventions will have representatives from different countries and stakeholder groups presenting their views on the situation of data protection in their countries. Although they bring a specific perspective about each country’s process, the overall diversity of policy views on data protection represented by the different participants in the general discussion will provide balance to the eventual narrow scope of those presentations. The second round of interventions, despite bringing only representatives from civil society, includes gender and country diversity. Its goal is to bring cases and examples from other countries in very short interventions. The speakers of this round were selected due to the specific work they have been doing in the field (e.g. research about the observation of data protection rules by private companies, litigation on specific cases related to data protection, etc.). The keynote from a high level representative from an intergovernmental organization active in Latin America is expected to take into account the diversity of the region. 

Onsite Moderator: Carolina Aguerre and Luiz Fernando Castro
Online Moderator: Diego Canabarro
Rapporteur: Jamila Venturini and

...

Session Organizers
avatar for Nathalia Sautchuk Patricio

Nathalia Sautchuk Patricio

Technical Advisor, NIC.br
I'm a computer engineer. I work as Technical Advisor for CGI.br and professor in some universities. My interests are: network neutrality, Education and ICT, Social and Digital Inclusion.
avatar for Vinicius W. O. Santos

Vinicius W. O. Santos

Technical advisor, NIC.br
avatar for Jamila Venturini

Jamila Venturini

CGI.br Advisory Team, NIC.br


Tuesday December 19, 2017 09:00 - 10:30
Room XXV - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

09:00

Multistakeholder governance of the Domain Name System, lessons learned for other IG issues (WS76)

Proposer's Name: Mr. Nigel Hickson
Proposer's Organization: ICANN
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Dierdre Sidjanski
Co-Proposer's Organization: ICANN
Moderator: Markus Kummer

Proposer:
Country: Switzerland
Stakeholder Group: Technical Community

Co-Proposer:
Country: Switzerland
Stakeholder Group: Technical Community

Speaker: Larry Strickling
Speaker: Keith Drazek
Speaker: Lori Schulman
Speaker: Matthew Shears 
Speaker: Arda Gerkens
Speaker: Grace Mutung'u
Speaker: Jordan Carter
Speaker: Farzaneh Badii
Speaker: Mark Carvell
Speaker: Markus Kummer
Speaker: Lilian Deluque Bruges

Content of the Session:
Key elements of the Domain Name System (DNS) are governed by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN). ICANN is a not for profit multistakeholder organization based in the US but with a global presence. Unlike in intergovernmental organizations, policy making is not dominated by any one group, but rather through equal engagement with business, the technical community, civil society, end users and governments. Anyone at ICANN has a voice and can contribute expertise to the search for policy solutions.  The governance structure of ICANN and its policy development processes are procedurally complex and demanding but have yielded sustainable solutions with broad buy-in from all actors.  The IANA Transition, where certain key responsibilities for the technical governance of the DNS were transitioned from the US authorities to the broad Internet Community is perhaps the best example of a complex policy negotiation – with a concrete result – being managed by a group of different stakeholders.

The multistakeholder Roundtable, while reflecting on the effectiveness of the multi-stakeholder process for the DNS at ICANN (and there are problems as well as achievements) will assess how it could be used for other IG issues which pose challenges for policy makers. The way we govern the Internet in the future will surely be a contributory factor in shaping our digital future.

A key Internet Governance questions addressed, through these Roundtable discussions is how bodies – especially those that are inter-governmental in nature, can adapt to benefit from the plurality of multi-stakeholder voices.

Relevance of the Session:
As the Internet issues faced by the international community proliferate, the governance of them becomes of increasing importance. National and Regional solutions are increasingly being found inadequate to deal with the global complexity of the digital transformation we are witnessing.

Tag 1: Multistakeholderism
Tag 2: ICANN
Tag 3: Digital Transformation

Interventions:
The Session will be organised in the form of a Roundtable with the discussants answering (arranged) questions from the moderator and then also the audience (both physically present and also on-line). 

Diversity:
The Discussants are drawn from different sectors, from different geographical areas and gender. They also include those experienced at the IGF and those for whom this IGF will be their first.

Onsite Moderator: Markus Kummer 
Online Moderator: Dierdre Sidjanski
Rapporteur: Nigel Hickson 

Online Participation:
In addition to taking questions, through the moderator, of those taking part remotely, we will in advance have at least one discussant taking part virtually and will also, in advance of the session, pose specific question on appropriate social media. 

Discussion facilitation:
In the spirit of an interactive roundtable the Moderator will ensure that all the discussants are involved in the conversation (they are not giving up their time for no purpose) and contribute to the overall theme. There will be no opening statements or introductions. He will go straight to questions.

He will also involve the audience for questions (not statements) and the on-line audience. He will group questions together and not simply ask each discussant in turn to answer, but ensure that the relevant discussant speaks.

Before the end of session, he will pose final questions to discussants , allowing them a brief time for reflection.

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: Yes
Link to Report: https://www.intgovforum.org/cms/igf2016/index.php/proposal/view_public/6

Agenda: 

  1. Introduction of session (moderator)
  2. Brief explanation of how the Domain Name System is governed in a multistakeholder manner
  3. Perspective from stakeholders around the table
  4. Could this model be used for other Internet Governance issues and topics?
  5. Discussion with Panelists and Audience
  6. Conclusion

 


Session Organizers
NH

Nigel Hickson

VP; IGO Engagement, ICANN
ICANN or cricket



Tuesday December 19, 2017 09:00 - 10:30
Room XXI - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

09:00

Policy Challenges for AI Development (WS91)

Proposer's Name: Mr. Rui ZHONG
Proposer's Organization: Internet Society of China
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Ping Wu
Co-Proposer's Organization: Internet Society of China
Co-Organizers:
Ms. Jing MA, Civil Society, China Association for Science and Technology


Session Format: Panel - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: China
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Co-Proposer:
Country: China
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speaker: Alison Gillwald
Speaker: Satish Babu
Speaker: Kenta Mochizuki
Speaker: Lei Ning
Speaker: Shenshen Cao

Content of the Session:
The application of AI will be quite extensive, for instance in the field of digital advertising, agriculture, sales, even music, art, psychology and charity. However, the development of AI will encounter many challenges, such as policy issues on data protection, ethical considerations in AI's design core value and neutrality. Therefore, some sorts of approaches and issues are necessary to be further discussed for the development and governance of AI.

This workshop will invite multi-stakeholder representatives to discuss what policy challenges AI will be encountered and how to create an enabling policy environment that conducive to the sustainable development from different dimensions and aspects.

Intended Agenda and issues to be discussed:

1.Xinmin Gao, Internet Society of China (3 mins; Opening remark)
2.Kenta Mochizuki, Yahoo Japan (8 mins; Talk about user's AI data privacy and protection)
3.Alison Gillwald, University of Cape Town (8 mins; Talk about ICT technology and policy advice for government)
4.Satish Babu, IEEE (8 mins; Talk about AI's challenges in Internet governance from perspective of technology)
5.Lei Ning, Baidu (8 mins; Talk about AI's challenges in Internet governance from perspective of product and international cooperation)
6.Shenshen Cao, Tencent (8 mins; Talk about AI's challenges in Internet governance from perspective of public policy and industry's sustainable development)
7.Discussion, on-site and remote interactive Q&A (45 mins; we will try to invite other potential guests to join discussion, such as Google, Microsoft)
8.Xinmin Gao, Internet Society of China (2 mins; close the workshop)


Relevance of the Session:
Artificial Intelligence(AI)is considered as one of important rising ICT industries and is shaping the digital future of human being. Technically, AI basically involves with Machine Learning, which means it will potentially collect, analyze and use large amounts of data, particularly some of which combined with other information could be identified to one’s personal information. In accordance with the legal provisions of personal information protection, these acts should be clearly, fully and completely authorized by the users, and also the purposes, means, content, retention duration and use scope etc. should be clearly informed to the users. Therefore, what kinds of specific policies and measures necessary in the process of collecting and using data should be discussed so as to guide and instruct the AI developer obeying the security principle, taking appropriate management measures and technical means based on the possibility and severity of personal information damage, as well as effectively protect personal information from unauthorized retrieval, loss, disclosure, damage and tampering.

Furthermore, as the machine is designed by the developer, the program naturally endowed with the designer's value orientation, which means the developer need to uphold a wide range of inclusiveness in the AI training and design process, fully considering the interest of women, children, the disabled, minorities and other vulnerable groups, as well as set special rules of judgment in extreme morality and law circumstance. In that the AI system is not as "technically neutral" as it looks like, the specific group may turned out to be the victims of systematic "prejudice" and "discrimination" unwittingly.

Generally, research and development of AI technologies or products are not restricted by administrative license and access. However, once these technologies and products applied to specific industry, there may arouse industry license issues. Will the industry regulation extend to AI field in the future? In finance, medicine, smart home, automatic driving and other specific fields, will regulation be necessary to intervene in the AI development? For example, if a driverless car with passengers encountered an accident, who should bear the main responsibility and how to monitor such situation?

Thus, how to govern the AI through practical policy approaches is very vital consideration for many areas, such as cyber security, personal information protection, network neutrality, ICT for sustainable development.

Tag 1: Digital Future
Tag 2: Internet of Things
Tag 3: Internet & ICTs for the Sustainable Development Goals

Interventions:
As the diverse background and knowledge difference of the speakers, we will invite them to share insights from different issue angles, including policy making advice, technical practice, product development, industry research etc. 

Diversity:
In the current stage, we have five speakers from different stakehloder groups (private sector, technical community and civil society), and two female speakers. Most of them come from developing countries and some of them are first time participating in IGF

Onsite Moderator: Xinmin GAO, VP, Internet Society of China
Online Moderator: Rui ZHONG, Director, Internet Society of China
Rapporteur: Rui ZHONG, Director, Internet Society of China

Online Participation:
The workshop is open to every one, both onsite and remote participation. We will have a remote moderator to interact with the remote participants and will foward their questions and insights to the workshop speakers and audience. We will post the message of workshop info online in advance to let more people knowing what will be discussed and welcome joining from the global.

Discussion facilitation:
The workshop will be set as panel format, firstly allowing each panelist to share her/his main views and then have mutual discussion about other speakers' viewpoints. The on-site moderator also raise some questions prepared. To listen to more voice, we reserve more time slot for audience and remote participants to ask questions and make comments. 

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: Yes
Link to Report: http://www.intgovforum.org/cms/wks2014/index.php/proposal/view_public/41

Agenda: 

1. Xinmin Gao, Internet Society of China (3 mins; Opening remark)
2. Kenta Mochizuki, Yahoo Japan (8 mins; Topic: User's AI data privacy and protection)
3. Alison Gillwald, University of Cape Town (8 mins; Topic: ICT technology and policy advice for government)
4. Satish Babu, IEEE (8 mins; Topic: AI's challenges in Internet governance from perspective of technology)
5. Lei Ning, Baidu (8 mins; Topic: AI's challenges in Internet governance from perspective of product and international cooperation)
6. Shenshen Cao, Tencent (8 mins; Topic: AI's challenges in Internet governance from perspective of public policy and industry's sustainable development)
7. Discussion, on-site and remote interactive Q&A (45 mins)
8. Xinmin Gao, Internet Society of China (2 mins; Closing remark for the workshop)

 


Session Organizers

Tuesday December 19, 2017 09:00 - 10:30
Room XXIV - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

09:00

SPECIAL SESSION ON 'DATA FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT ROAD MAPS'

Debates over the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) over its several years of effort led to a renewed and broader agreement about sustainability, and then led to the endorsement of the Sustainable Development Goals. These goals are not only built on the MDGs, but also supplant them, as of course, a greater awareness of the need for broader engagement to achieve the change that societally and economically is needed to shape our world into  the world we want. The adoption of the SDGs by the United Nations, renewed understanding of how the major challenges that the world is facing are interdependent. No country can really expect to be its own island, whether in its need for food, water, energy, or jobs. The SDGs are a foundational platform that all countries are challenged with the adoption and the endorsement by the United Nations to consider how to address the challenges.

The SDGs provide a new vision for development, a vision that does not assume Development is isolated, but understands and admits that it is changing the role of women and youth; bringing access to ICTs to small farmers and midwives in developing countries; advancing access to information and education for children that have not school rooms, or limited access to books in their language to help them learn.

In response to growing awareness about the importance of sustainable development initiatives and activities and to meet what has been established as necessary goals for the world, the SDGs offer the potential guidelines to move the world toward a sustainable future.

Looking back at the MDGs, this session proposes to look at the learning of the MDGs very much like a prologue to what must be done now.  In fact, the SDGs are already finding ways to gain supporting implementation initiatives. In addition, to take into account lessons learned about lack of data, and lack of focused reporting on achievements.

In order to know where we are, we need data.  We cannot plan how we move toward achieving the SDGS unless we have better understanding. As a wise sage once said: If you do not know where you are going, any road will get you there. In addition, another study the past to know the future.  Many reports are published by businesses, NGOs, and think tanks. Reports are published annually by UN agencies.  However, it is very difficult to determine what is factual from all these reports, and who provides the input to the studies, so it is difficult to determine where “we” are.

The implementation of the 17 UN SDGs in developing countries is only a fortnight away, and as it looks, the UN could be up against more than it really understood. Creating a form of standardized reporting is very challenging for developing countries, unless there is a sort of “road-map” that is built on their present status in terms of data gathering mechanisms and analysis.

 According to World Bank Report (Poverty Global Practices Group and Development Data Group April 2015), a significant number of developing and least developed nations across Asia and Africa lack sufficient data to be used by business and policymakers in making estimates.  

 Lack of data and why the need for sufficient data:

Data helps experts weigh the feasibility of goals, provides clarity on the nature of the problem and facilitates statistic-based supervision and evaluation of development progress. It is paramount in intermediate outcome tracking and determination of whether the paths predicts that a country or the UN will achieve or miss on an SDG and its targets. Most developing countries lack data even in priority areas and that has come as one of the most pressing challenges the 2030 Agenda is likely to face. As has been suggested, a little under 30 of the world’s poorest countries have extremely limited data to measure the trend of SDGs indicators.

Mechanisms for gathering data:

One fundamental data collection method is through conducting household surveys, which will provide important data for evaluation and analysis of individual wellbeing in terms of health and education statuses, agriculture, energy and consumption levels. Another reliable method is the use of administrative records, which can provide statistics on demographic changes and trends, for instance, to aid in the formulation of health, education and social protection policies.

However, we must be realistic that developing countries often lack resources to conduct the aforementioned surveys; some have poor and unreliable registration systems, which may force analysts to rely solely on non-statistical estimates. To add to the challenges, one SDG target requires that legal identity, including birth registration, be provided for all by 2030. Relying only on telecom operators/mobile operators to report on connectivity, for instance, is a very flawed measurement, as has been demonstrated by Lirne Asia’s research. 

Data measurement mechanisms that are suitable for developing and developed countries need updating.  Moreover, this needs to happen quickly. It may be that grants and training programs for developing countries will be needed to help strengthen the organizations at the national levels so that they can enhance their ability to gather reliable data and be more comprehensive with what they provide to the UN registry bodies if SDGs are to be met.

The workshop on “Data for sustainable development road-maps” session will bring together a diverse set of UN Agency representatives responsible for gathering statistics; other kinds of data producers, business professionals and users, as well as innovators in the field (national and international experts) to discuss the way forward, including exploring how new technologies and approaches that can be used to strengthen the data ecosystem globally.

The session would be organized around five themes aiming to achieving the following outcomes:

Theme 1: Addressing data gaps and financing

●          present the current situation for countries to produce SDG indicators and  
            highlight data gaps.

●          discuss opportunities to strengthen census and survey regimes.

●          discuss opportunities to further develop the administrative data system with the
            view of ensuring harmonization, comparability, and quality of data.

●          present possibilities for using new data/ technology to address identified data
            gaps and engage new actors.

●          to determine how alignment with national and regional agendas will impact data  
           collection in developing countries and indicator production and reporting.

  •       Identify possible approaches for addressing the funding gap (both in terms of
          mobilizing additional resources and using those available more effectively)

Theme 2: Encouraging data use

●          have an open dialogue with key users on how data/ statistics produced can   
            better meet their needs.

●          Identify ways to harness the opportunity of the momentum around data for the
            SDGs to strengthen the sharing, accessibility and presentation of data.

●          raise the profile of data production and use with key stakeholders including
            policy- makers to encourage the use of improved data for evidence-based decision-making and accountability.

Theme 3: Strengthening the Data Ecosystem

●          solidify the multi-stakeholder approach to achieving and measuring the SDGs,
            and  create new data communities.

●          Identify and discuss solutions to major funding gaps.

●          Identify and discuss solutions to major capacity gaps.

●          Provide an opportunity for country-to-country learning in the SDG indicator
            production process.

●          ensure high-level political and policy-maker buy-in for the Roadmap process.

●          Identify key issues for the policy and enabling environment for the data
            ecosystem. 

Theme 4: Improving Systems

  • How can the promotion of transparent data support the implementation of the SDGs at both the national and global levels?
  • What kind of data regime is needed for the most effective and robust system for the implementation of SDGs?
  • To what extent would data availability contribute to delivery of national and global goals?
  • Learning from home grown and other non-traditional systems of information management in developing countries.

Theme 5: Policy and enabling environment   

This theme will focus on the necessary policy initiatives in relation to data production, sharing and use as well as the enabling environment to ensure data quality, interoperability, security and protection. 

...

Session Organizers
MC

Marilyn Cade

CEO, ICT Strategies
Security, Stability and Resiliency; engagement of SMEs and business groups from developing countries and regions; Internet Governance and implications for ICANN's continued stability. Business users interest in ICANN. Questions about ICANN's origins, and progress toward an international... Read More →
avatar for Wisdom Donkor

Wisdom Donkor

President / CEO, Africa Open Data and Internet Research Foundation
avatar for Zeina BOU HARB

Zeina BOU HARB

Head of International Cooperation, OGERO Telecom


Tuesday December 19, 2017 09:00 - 12:00
Room XXVI - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

10:00

HIGH LEVEL THEMATIC SESSION 'IMPACT OF DIGITIZATION ON POLITICS, PUBLIC TRUST & DEMOCRACY’

“The impact of digitisation on politics, public trust, and democracy                                                 

The digital space, as a cornerstone of the public policy space, can be a great enabler for democratic discourse and participation, as well as inclusive policy-making. At the same time, the misuse of the digital public policy space can lead to the distortion of truth, mistrust in public information, and misrepresentation of public opinion. 

This session will discuss both the opportunities and the challenges that digitisation brings to the digital political sphere, the public trust, and democracy. Discussions will revolve around ways of strengthening the benefits of democratic participation and inclusion via digital means, limiting the negative impact of the misuse of the public policy space, and rebuilding trust among online users. 

The session will also address the roles and responsibilities of different stakeholders. It will look at issues such as government policies aimed at creating more inclusive policy-making processes through the use of digital tools, the responsibility of Internet intermediaries for the dissemination of fake news and false news that can influence political processes, and the elements that can help rebuild trust among users. Also, the session will discuss the role of media actors in a democracy and the implications of the ongoing structural change in the media ecosystem. Most importantly, the session will look into whether and how digital literacy, education, and awareness-raising could be the key towards empowering citizens not only to take advantage of digital tools, but also to deal with the challenges related to the misuse of the digital public space. 

‘Good stories’, ‘bad stories’, and lessons learnt will be explored as part of the discussions. 
 
Host Chair:
 Mr. Philipp Metzger, Director General, Swiss Federal Office of Communications (OFCOM) 
 
Moderator:
 Ms. Nathalie Ducommun, Talk Master of Swiss Television RTS 
 
Remote Moderator:
 Ms. Katharina Hoene, DiploFoundation 
 
Agenda:
 
Introduction by Mr. Philipp Metzger, Director General, OFCOM - 10 min 
  
Part 1: Benefits - 80 min 
Remarks from first group of panelists (8 people, 2min input each) 
Discussion with audience 
Part 2: Challenges - 80 min 
Remarks from second group of panelists (8 people, 2min input each)
Discussion with audience 
Conclusions and wrap-up - 10 min 
 
Policy questions:
 
Part 1 (Benefits): What are the benefits that digitisation brings/can bring to political processes, democracy, and the public trust? How can they be leveraged? How can digital tools be most effectively used to strengthen democratic participation and restore public trust in the online space?  Who can make this happen? Part 2 (Challenges): What are the challenges that digitisation brings/can bring to politics, democracy, and the public trust? How can they be addressed, and by whom? What are the roles and responsibilities of the different stakeholders? How can we ensure that digital tools can be trusted as key resources for democratic participation and inclusive societies? Can digital literacy, education, and awareness-raising be the key towards empowering citizens to deal with the challenges related to the misuse of the digital public space? 
 
Speakers
:

Mr. Martin Chungong, Secretary General, Inter-Parliamentary Union 
Ms. Nighat Dad, Executive Director, Digital Rights Foundation, Pakistan 
Mr. Bobby Duffy, Global Director, Ipsos Social Research Institute 
Ms. Farida Dwi Cahyarini, Secretary-General, Ministry of Communication and Information Technology, Indonesia 
Mr. Hossam Elgamal, Chairman, Egyptian Cabinet Information and Decision Support Center (IDSC) 
Ms. Mariya Gabriel, Commissioner for Digital Economy and Society, European Commission
Mr. Hasanul Haq Inu, Minister of Information, Bangladesh
Ms. Malavika Jayaram, Executive Director, Digital Asia Hub
Mr. Frank La Rue, Assistant Director-General Communication & Information, UNESCO
Ms. Claudia Luciani, Director of Democratic Governance and Anti-discrimination, Council of Europe
Ms. Dunja Mijatovic, International Expert on Human Rights and Media Freedom, Board Member of Access Now
Mr. Gonzalo Navarro, Executive Director, Asociación Latinoamericana de Internet
Mr. Jean Paul Philippot, President, European Broadcasting Union
Ms. Nanjira Sambuli, Digital Equality Advocacy Manager, World Wide Web Foundation
Mr. Sébastien Soriano, Chairman ARCEP (French National Regulatory Authority for Telecoms and Posts), Chairman BEREC (Body of European Regulators for Electronic Communications)
Mr. Robert Strayer, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Cyber and International Communications and Information Policy, U.S. Department of State

 




Tuesday December 19, 2017 10:00 - 13:00
Main Hall - Room XVII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

10:10

Data for the humanitarian field (OF75)
Digital technologies have revolutionised the ways in which humanitarian organisations conduct needs assessments, as well as monitoring and evaluation programmes. New data is being collected for humanitarian purposes, including online information, data exhaust, geospatial data, and crowdsourced data. This session will look at the ways in which the humanitarian community can best use this data while avoiding breaches in privacy and data protection. Data literacy efforts are more than ever needed to improve our response and support more evidence based decision-making.

With the growth of localized humanitarian action, crowdsourced data and participatory mapping, there is need to conduct such analysis with the involvement and active participation of local communities. While these efforts have the combined benefit of providing more accurate depictions of needs, there are several key questions that need to be addressed, including: How to make crowdsourced data collection sustainable over longer periods of time? How to manage expectations of communities that might be anticipating immediate response? How can we better engage local communities with data readiness?

This open forum will discuss the opportunities and challenges in new forms of data collection facilitated by the digital revolution, with experts from the IFRC, as well as input from other organisations, governments, civil society, and the business sector.
Tag 1: Big Data
Tag 2: Community Empowerment
Tag 3: Data Localization
Name(s) of Speaker(s):
Speakers:
CJ Hendrix, Data Systems Analyst, Humanitarian Data Exchange (HDX), Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA)
Emir Hartato, Project Co-Manager for PetaBencana.id (an applied research project affiliated with MIT Urban Risk Lab)
Rania Alerksoussi, Coordinator of the Federation-wide Databank and Reporting System (FDRS), IFRC
Heather Leson, Data Literacy Lead, International Federation of the Red Cross Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) (moderator)

Rania Al Erksoussi is the Coordinator for the Federation-wide Databank and Reporting System. Rania joined the IFRC in 2008 and worked in multiple roles within the Humanitarian Pandemic Preparedness team first, then in the Health Department. More recently, she supported the Health Department’s data and information management, strategic planning, and reporting. Additionally, she worked on coordinating, disseminating and training National Society representatives in collecting and analysing data using the Rapid Mobile Phone-based system. Rania has a Master's degree in business administration (MBA) and an undergraduate degree in French Literature. She comes to the RCRC from a business background working in the private sector in Syria.

CJ Hendrix is a data systems analyst for the Humanitarian Data Exchange (HDX), a project of UN OCHA. He has worked in the fields of geographic information systems and satellite imagery analysis for over 20 years with focus on humanitarian information management since 2005.  He has worked in environmental projects and humanitarian emergencies in Kenya, Eritrea, Pakistan, Uganda, Haiti, Sudan, South Sudan, and the United States.  In 2011 he began work on the Humanitarian Exchange Language (HXL) which is now being used to improve data sharing in the humanitarian community and is a core component of HDX.

Emir Hartato is a Project Co-Manager for PetaBencana.id<https://info.petabencana.id/about/>,an applied research project affiliated with MIT Urban Risk Lab that has won Internet for Development Award from The Information Society Innovation Fund (ISIF) Asia at the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) 2017. He has an undergraduate degree in Geography (University of Indonesia) and recently, he completed a  Masters of Geographic Information Science (MGIS) at the University of Canterbury (UC), Christchurch, New Zealand with the thesis focusing on crowdsourcing framework for disaster management. He also worked for almost four years with the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT) that involves capacity building for various stakeholders in the use of OpenStreetMap (OSM) data for humanitarian and economic development in various regions (Indonesia, the Philippines, and Malawi).

Heather is the Data Literacy Lead at International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies. As a technologist, she strengthens community collaboration via humanitarian technologies and social entrepreneurship. She builds partnerships, curates digital spaces, fosters volunteer engagement and delivers training while inspiring systems for co-creation with maps, code and data. At the International Federation of Red Cross Red Crescent, her mandate includes data skills global advocacy and training programs in partnership with the 190 national societies and the 13 million volunteers. Previously, she was lead programs on community, social innovation, and technology at Qatar Computing Research Institute (Qatar Foundation), Ushahidi, and Open Knowledge (School of Data). Her experience also includes working on internet technologies including domain name services, network operations, and software-as-a-service. She is a current Board Member at OpenStreetMap Foundation and a past Board Member at the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (4 years).   She co-wrote a chapter on Open Communities and articles the power of data and digital literacy for the World Economic Forum and Civicus Datashift. Heather holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Combined Political Science and History from Carleton University, as well as a Library and Information Technician diploma from Seneca College of Applied Arts and Technology.



Tags - big data, community empowerment, data literacy/data localization

Name of Online Moderator: Barbara Rosen Jacobson
Background Paper: data_for_the_humanitarian_field_-_igf_proposal.pdf
Past IGF Participation: No
Report Link:
Name: Ms. Heather Leson
Organizational Affiliation: IFRC
 

Session Organizers
avatar for Heather Leson

Heather Leson

Data Literacy Lead, IFRC
Heather is the Data Literacy Lead at International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies. As a technologist, she strengthens community collaboration via humanitarian technologies and social entrepreneurship. She builds partnerships, curates digital spaces, fosters volunteer... Read More →


Tuesday December 19, 2017 10:10 - 11:10
Room XXIII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

10:10

Cybersecurity: Balancing security, openness, and privacy (WS31)

Proposer's Name: Mr. Arsene Tungali
Proposer's Organization: Rudi International
Co-Proposer's Name: Mr. Samme-Nlar Tomslin
Co-Proposer's Organization: Consultant
Co-Organizers:
Mr. Arsene Tungali, Civil Society, Rudi International
Mr. Tomslin Samme-Nlar, Civil Society, Consultant
Ms. Yolanda Mlonzi, Civil Society, Student

Session Format: Round Table - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Co-Proposer:
Country: Cameroon
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speaker: Duncan Macintosh
Speaker:
Tatiana Tropina
Speaker: Michael Oghia
Speaker: Kai Rehnelt

Content of the Session:
Cybersecurity and the use of digital networks for ensuring individual security are increasingly of concern to all sectors of society. We see a rise in state-sponsored threats, hacktivism, citizens being surveilled, Internet of Things (IoT) being deployed with little or no security, and not only as an initiative from governments or security forces, but as a request from citizens and social groups interested in a more secure and safe environment as well.

Sometimes policy responses and measures to attain security, work against openness and privacy, however. We see many governments asking for ways to access users’ data or to surveil them in order to investigate crime. Sometimes encryption is seen by states as a hindrance to national security. It is therefore important that cybersecurity governance does not supersede other Internet governance issues. Cybersecurity mechanisms must not interfere with the ability to use the Internet to exercise rights to freedom of speech and privacy.On the other hand, users must answer the question of how much of their privacy and intimacy they are willing to sacrifice for greater security?

This workshop will serve as a good discussion platform for members of the Civil Society Internet Governance Caucus (IGC) as well as IGF participants who are interested in the topic. This session will focus on discussing how we ensure openness and privacy while looking seriously at cybersecurity issues as well.

This roundtable session will bring together subject matter experts and others interested in this topic to share new insights. The session will include the following:
- A moderator who will introduce the theme and the subject matter experts
- Subject matter experts will give initial remarks, focusing on one aspect of the theme. They will highlight the relationship between security and openness as well as the relationship between security and privacy, among others.
- The moderator will then lead a discussion with the participants around the table.
- The moderator will offer closing remarks.

Relevance of the Session:
The safety of netizens on the Internet and their trust of it will have a significant role on how the Internet impacts society, and economy going forward. Given the community’s desire to connect the next billion, ensuring that we generate collaborative, multistakeholder solutions to the privacy vs. security debate is paramount. Moreover, we posit that privacy and security are a false dichotomy, since they can coexist but require more dialogue in order to effectively address so that our digital future can be more secure by remain open.

This session will look into those questions and will help come up with an understanding on how we can find balance between these issues, as well as invite perspectives from across stakeholder groups.

Tag 1: Cybersecurity
Tag 2: Privacy
Tag 3: Openness

Interventions:
A roundtable is the format that is best suited to allow conversations among participants, on equal footing. We have selected a number of experts whose knowledge will help quicken the debate and open up to other participants around the table to share their views as well.

Each one of them will be sharing their expertise in this area, covering a specific aspect based on their background and expertise. Some of them are from the technical community, using their technical background to discuss cybersecurity issues and how they affect the openness and privacy of communications/data. Others are cyber security specialists and others from the civil society.

Their remarks will be followed by insights from other participants who will have equal right and who will also have an interest or experience in the area of cybersecurity. With the help of the moderator, the conversation will help members of the IGC and other participants understand the topic and share relevant examples and applications from their own contexts.

Diversity:
The session organizers are taking seriously the issue of diversity in planning this workshop. Among the two proposers, one has organised a session last year (2016), the other one has never been to any global IGF so this will be his first experience. He is really looking forward to it. Moreover, one of our co-organizers (a lady) will be attending IGF 2017 as her second IGF but this will be the first session she is working on. Our onsite moderator is a young lady!

Our speakers will be coming from different backgrounds and regions. We one of the speakers who is youth, the moderator being youth as well. Moderator is from Africa, speakers from America, Europe and South Asia which is a way for us to ensure everyone is included and we have insights from all over the world. They will not only be from civil society but we will have one form the technical community, another one bringing in legal expertise, etc.

The Internet Governance Caucus (IGC) is comprised of different people, from different regions with similar or different focus and expertise. Putting together this workshop proposal has been a collaborative work and we tried our best to include all possible voices into this workshop proposal and we look forward for it at the upcoming IGF.

Onsite Moderator: Chenai Chair
Online Moderator: Chenai Chair
Rapporteur: Joash Ntenga Moitui

Online Participation:
Our onsite moderator will also serve as remote moderator to ensure equal speaking opportunity for our remote participants. Since the IGC has many members that cannot make it to the global IGF, we intend to facilitate their participation as well using the remote participation facilities provided in the room. The discussion moderator will be checking with remote participants to see whether there is anyone on the queue to be given space to either speak on the mic or send a text that will be read.

Discussion facilitation:
All participants in the room will be seated around the table, we will ensure there are microphones available to ensure everyone is able to have access to one and contribute. Subject matter experts as well as participants will have equal opportunity to be part of discussions. We value a round table format because we want to hear as many insights from everyone to enrich the debate. Our experts will be helping clarify some aspects of the discussions. Online members will be catered for as well.

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: Yes
Link to Report: http://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/index.php?q=filedepot_download/4098/252

 


Session Organizers
avatar for Arsene Tungali

Arsene Tungali

Executive Director, Rudi International
Arsene Tungali has been working and collaborating for the past 5 years on projects related to Internet governance, child online protection, and women’s participation in ICT. He has either conducted or supported research projects, such as the CIPESA’s State of Internet Freedom... Read More →


Tuesday December 19, 2017 10:10 - 11:40
Room IX - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

10:10

Youth Engagement in Internet Governance Ecosystem: Current Scenario, Controversies and Future Action (WS193)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Bruna Santos 
Proposer's Organization: Youth Observatory
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Sze Ming Tan
Co-Proposer's Organization: Sinar Project 
Co-Organizers:
Miss Sze Ming Tan, Civil Society, SINAR PROJECT/ Youth for Rights (Y4R).
Miss Sarah Linke, Civil Society, Youth Observatory.
Mr. Carlos Guerrero, Civil Society, HiperDerecho and Youth Observatory.


Session Format: Birds of a Feather - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: Brazil
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Co-Proposer:
Country: Malaysia
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speaker: Jianne Soriano
Speaker: David Morar
Speaker: Bruna Santos 
Speaker: Elisabeth Schauermann


Content of the Session:
Taking into consideration the Sustainable development goals and the importance of the youth for the Internet of the Future, the main idea of the present proposal is to hold a workshop with the IGF community in order to discuss the actual problems and barriers encountered by youth online and by the community when dealing with us.

By acknowledging our newcomer status on the IG related discussions, we want to learn and, therefore, get involved in the policy discussion and to have our voices heard. But first, we believe it is of great importance to debate on the barriers, such as the need to strengthen the network to planning and building strategies of youth movements representation and also the importance of programmes that are not only directed towards capacity building initiatives but also on the engagement of youth on policy development processes.

When addressing these questions, the discussion should focus whether or not the Youth should build an agenda for its engagement on the IG ecosystem, and if yes, which topics should be present on that. Having said that and given the initial framework, the session aims to discuss the following questions with the audience:
- What are the barriers encountered by youngsters when entering the Internet Governance Ecosystem? How can we prospect the youth to engage with IG?
- Is there any ideal model of Youth engagement program?  What do you think are the key elements to any of them ?
- Considering the amount of Youth movements around the globe, how can we represent the diversity of realities and youths in order to legitimately represent their claims? How do you think those initiatives could work together in order to exchange experiences, best practices and regional backgrounds?
- Talking about the need of a forum or a line of action that would conjoint the ideas and practices of these newly engaged individuals, do you think that there should be a Youth Agenda for Internet Governance? Or a  Best Practice youth Forum within the IGF ? 

Relevance of the Session:
The internet in the youth’s life is not a new technology, is something that make part about what we are, we develop our personality with internet: how we communicate with each other, how we learn, how we share our experiences. We are not only consuming and creating content, but we are also engaging in the evolution and use of the internet. We are creating new models of online businesses, developing internet protocols, defending human rights on the internet and participating in the development of community networks, among other things. Although the number of youth involved and the high impact of their activities, we are still underrepresented at internet governance forums.

Among/In spite of the existing obstacles, several youth movements have emerged, underlining the need for the inclusion of young people on the internet governance ecosystem and creating capacity building opportunities to access such ecosystem with solid tools and a more resourceful participation. They are generating new lines of discussion. It is thus important to generate synergies among the different movements, learn from the exchange of experiences and discuss how to better approach the involvement of youth in the internet policy development processes, be it at the national, regional or global level.

Addressing the nature and possibilities of youth involvement and inclusion is not only important to strengthen the voices of the youngsters already interested in and active on the internet governance ecosystem, but also to pave the way for newcomers and future generations.

Moreover, as we are engaged in the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals, we should bare in mind that 70% of the under 25-year-olds, i.e., 1.9 billion people, are not yet online (fuente: World Bank). That is to say, when we develop programmes and policies for the next billion to connect, we should not leave out the youth approach. 

Tag 1: Youth Engagement
Tag 2: Internet & ICTs for the Sustainable Development Goals
Tag 3: Multistakeholder Cooperation

Interventions:
As a discussion facilitation dynamics, we would provide each speaker a question, leaving us with the following division:

Bruna Santos, Youth Observatory - Is there any ideal model of Youth engagement program?  What do you think are the key elements to any of them ?
David Morar, Schar School Of Policy and Government - Talking about the need of a forum or a line of action that would conjoint the ideas and practices of these newly engaged individuals, do you think that there should be a Youth Agenda for Internet Governance? Or a  Best Practice youth Forum within the IGF ? 
Elisabeth Schauermann, Internet Society IGF Ambassador  - What are the barriers encountered by youngsters when entering the Internet Governance Ecosystem? How can we prospect the youth to engage with IG?
Jianne Soriano, Net Mission Ambassador - Considering the amount of Youth movements around the globe, how can we represent the diversity of realities and youths in order to legitimately represent their claims? How do you think those initiatives could work together in order to exchange experiences, best practices and regional backgrounds?


Diversity:
1. All of the involved in the organization of this Session — Speakers, Rapporteur, Moderators — are either Young professionals or engaged in Youth movements.
2. Of our 4 Speakers, three are female. Our Rapporteur is also female.
3. Our Speakers are from Latin America, North America, Europe and Asia. We have privileged Youth Speakers from developing nations such as Brazil and Malaysia.
4. Our speakers represents both the Academia, Civil Society and Business stakeholders. 

Onsite Moderator: Paula Côrte Real 
Online Moderator: Elisson Diones
Rapporteur: Veronica Arroyo

Online Participation:
A remote moderator will enlist questions and comments from the online audience during the workshop. Prior to the workshop, the idea is to gather content posted with the hashtags #YouthAgenda #YouthBarriers, further on this content will be used to bring in comments and questions from prospective attendees which may enrich the debate.

A collaborative document will gather these records of comments and questions prior to, during, and after the workshop, and will be integrated into the report. A variety of media can also serve as background material for this debate, based on previous workshops.

Remote participation tools will ensure an inclusive, accessible, and global audience. 

Discussion facilitation:
The proposed session is the birds of a feather format, in order to promote an informal discussion on the proposed topics between onsite and online audience and to allow interventions freely within the open mic. We believe the Birds of a Feather session format will provide a non-commercial, dynamic environment for attendees to openly discuss current topics of focused mutual interest within the youth movements with a strong emphasis on audience-driven discussion, professional networking and grassroots participation.

Therefore the proposed dynamics is the following:

1. Opening - (10 min)

Onsite moderator opens the session and introduces the speakers:
Bruna Santo
s, Youth Observatory
David Morar, Schar School Of Policy and Government
Elisabeth Schauermann, Internet Society IGF Ambassador
Jianne Soriano, Net Mission Ambassador

2. Onsite moderator will address each speaker the following question (30 min, 7 min each):

  1. What are the barriers encountered by youngsters when entering the Internet Governance Ecosystem? How can we prospect the youth to engage with IG? (Elisabeth Schauermann)

  2. Is there any ideal model of Youth engagement program?  What do you think are the key elements to any of them ?  (Bruna Santos)

  3. Considering the amount of Youth movements around the globe, how can we represent the diversity of realities and youths in order to legitimately represent their claims? How do you think those initiatives could work together in order to exchange experiences, best practices and regional backgrounds? (Jianne Soriano)

  4. Talking about the need of a forum or a line of action that would conjoint the ideas and practices of these newly engaged individuals, do you think that there should be a Youth Agenda for Internet Governance? Or a  Best Practice youth Forum within the IGF ? (David Morar)

3. Group discussion on the assigned questions (20 min) 
Two groups: Group a will address questions 1 and 2 (Elisabeth and Bruna)  and group b will address questions 3 and 4 (Jianne and David).  One panel

...

Session Organizers
avatar for Bruna Santos

Bruna Santos

Internet Society IGF Ambassador (2017)
Internet Governance researcher at LAPIN/UnB. Representative of the Latin America and Caribbean region at the Executive Committee of Non-Commercial Users Constituency - EC/NCUC. Youth Observatory Member (SIG Youth).


Tuesday December 19, 2017 10:10 - 11:40
Room XXVII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

10:40

DC on Net Neutrality

The annual session of the UN IGF Dynamic Coalition on Network Neutrality (DCNN) promotes multistakeholder analysis about the state of Net Neutrality in the world.  

In 2017, Zero Rating* continued to be one of the most discussed net neutrality issue and, for this reason the session will be largely dedicated to the Zero Rating Map, which is 2017 outcome of the DCNN.  The purpose of the Map is to build an open access resource that can contribute to the promotion of a more informed debate on Net Neutrality and Zero Rating and can be exploited by a wide range of stakeholders, including researchers, regulators, entrepreneurs and user rights advocates. The Zero Rating Map is an ongoing effort and the beta version will be presented during the session in order to stimulate feedback from the participants.

To date, inputs on Zero Rating practices in several countries have already been collected, utilising an open Ethercalc sheet. All interested stakeholders are invited to contribute to this crowdsourced effort, adding information regarding their respective countries. The Ethercalc sheet will remain open to receive submissions during the IGF and after the IGF, and the Zero Rating Map will be regularly updated, including the most recent information added to the Ethercalc sheet. The Zero Rating Map will be available on www.zerorating.info 

The elaboration of the Zero Rating Map is coordinated by Dr Luca Belli, DCNN Chair and Senior Researcher at the Center for Technology & Society at Fundação Getulio Vargas (CTS/FGV). All contributors to this effort will be able, but not obliged, to include their name as authors of the contributions to the Map. Contributors stating their name will be explicitly acknowledged in the Zero Rating Map, which will be graciously maintained by CTS/FGV.

Keynote remarks:

  • Sébastien Soriano, President of ARCEP and Chairman of BEREC

Speakers include:
  • Luca Belli, Head of Internet Governance, Center for Technology and Society at FGV
  • María Paz Canales, Executive Director, Derechos Digitales
  • Maryant Fernandez, Senior Policy Advisor, EDRi 
  • Amba Uttara Kak, Tech Policy Fellow, Mozilla
  • Dhanaraj Thakur, Senior Research Manager, Web Foundation/Alliance for Affordable Internet
  • Alfredo Velazco, Executive Director, Usuarios Digitales

 

* For further information on Zero Rating, see the 2016 DCNN Outcome on “Net neutrality reloaded: zero rating, specialised service, ad blocking and traffic management


Session Organizers
avatar for Luca Belli

Luca Belli

Head of Internet Governance, Center for Technology and Society at FGV
Luca Belli, PhD is Senior Researcher at the Center for Technology and Society (CTS) of Fundação Getulio Vargas (FGV), where he heads the Internet Governance project. Luca is also associated researcher at Centre de Droit Public Comparé of Paris 2 University. For those who do not... Read More →


Tuesday December 19, 2017 10:40 - 11:40
Room XXIV - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

10:40

DC on Trade
TITLE:  Dynamic Coalition on Trade and the Internet

AGENDA:

1. Brief update on current state of play in trade and Internet governance, including presentation of the background paper that was finalized on December 4 (20 minutes).

Speakers: Jeremy Malcolm, EFF (on DC’s history, objectives, and demographics), Jyoti Panday, EFF (on background paper), Kelly Kim, Open Net Korea (on RCEP), Parminder Jeet Singh, IT for Change

2. Discussion and adoption of the draft resolution on transparency (20 minutes).

Speakers: TBC

3. Discussion on priorities and work program for 2018 (20 minutes).

Speakers: William  Drake, U. Zurich (on initiatives to link trade and IG communities & discussions)



BACKGROUND PAPER [LINK]: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1zxlSbR_JO6rra7jmDupU315UkJc6ThJN-3Hx0iGCv7Y/edit?ts=594bee28#heading=h.ali7pcrzpkkc

ORGANIZER(S) NAME(S):
 Jeremy Malcolm

ORGANIZATIONAL AFFILIATION(S):
Electronic Frontier Foundation

Session Organizers
avatar for Jeremy Malcolm

Jeremy Malcolm

Senior Global Policy Analyst, EFF


Tuesday December 19, 2017 10:40 - 11:40
Room XII - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

10:40

Quick and Easy: AI Solutions for Nimble Public Services (OF42)
While basic e-governance services become increasingly matter-of-course we would like to catch a glimpse of customer friendly public services in a near future. The possibility to obtain information from and to interact with public authorities using the internet is used by at least 70% of the population while sending filled forms to public authorities - by 32% of individuals in Latvia (according to Eurostat). Now we aim at a broader and more sophisticated inclusion of different groups of people with the help of AI and data based solutions: 
• the use of data based solutions improves the efficiency of public services;
• spoken language communication expands accessibility of public services for people with special needs like visual impairment or dyslexia;
• multilingual communication helps foreigners living or doing business in or with Latvia;
• virtual agents enrich the experience of the customers of public libraries and increase the value of the digital public data supporting human assistants rather than substituting them.
Tag 1: Internet-based Innovation
Tag 2: Policies Enabling Access
Tag 3: Enhancing Accessibility for Persons with Disabilities
Name(s) of Speaker(s):
Mr.Edmunds Belskis
Dr.Signe Balina
Dr.Andrejs Vasiljevs
Mr.Aigars Jaundalderis

Name of Online Moderators: Ms.Liene Grike, Ms.Elza Mikule
Background Paper: tilde_virtual_assistants_for_igf_2017.pdf
Past IGF Participation: No
Report Link:
Name: Ms. Katrina Kosa-Ammari
Organizational Affiliation: Permanent Mission of Latvia to the UN, Geneva
 

Session Organizers
avatar for Katrina Kosa-Ammari

Katrina Kosa-Ammari

Counsellor, Permanent Mission of Latvia to the UN in Geneva
AI solutions for e-governance and more



Tuesday December 19, 2017 10:40 - 11:40
Room XXV - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

10:40

A Digital Geneva Convention to protect cyberspace (WS34)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Jessica Zucker
Proposer's Organization: Microsoft Corporation
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Kaja Ciglic
Co-Proposer's Organization: Microsoft
Co-Organizers:
Mr. Paul, Nicholas, Private Sector, Microsoft Mr. Duncan, Hollis, Civil Society, Temple University, Geneva Internet Platform/Diplo Foundation

Session Format: Round Table - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: United States
Stakeholder Group: Private Sector

Co-Proposer:
Country: United States
Stakeholder Group: Private Sector

Speaker: Latha Reddy
Speaker: Konstantinos Komaitis
Speaker: Paul Nicholas
Speaker: Ben Hiller
Speaker: Elina Noor
Speaker: Fathi Derder
Speaker: Marilia Maciel
Speaker: Yvette Issar

Content of the Session:
Effective cybersecurity is critical to international peace and economic stability; however governments continue to invest in greater offensive capabilities in cyberspace, and nation-state attacks on civilians are on the rise. The world needs new rules to protect and defend civilians against nation-sponsored attacks. The creation of a Digital Geneva Convention can play the central role in safeguarding citizens, infrastructure, and private companies around the world from state-led or state-sanctioned cyberattacks in times of peace. Every day we are reminded why we need an international treaty to protect civilians, and while the work done to date, through vehicles such as the G7, G20, and United Nations Group of Governmental Experts (UNGGE) are essential, a gap still exists between these intended efforts and everyday reality. The process of creating the Digital Geneva Convention involves formidable challenges. It will require political will and commitment from government leaders across the world. It will also necessitate drawing from lessons learned from other similar processes in non-ICT sectors, which were spearheaded by non-governmental groups. The purpose of this workshop is to bring together cybersecurity and technology policy experts from different stakeholder groups to raise awareness of the crucial issue of cybersecurity norms, the gap in international efforts and reality, and discuss a potential way forward. By building on the work done to date, governments, the technology sector and civil society groups can pave the way for an agreement that will ensure a stable and secure cyberspace.

Relevance of the Session:
This panel discussion on the Digital Geneva Convention and international cybersecurity norms underpins the future of our online environment and is as such directly related to the main theme of IGF 2017 – Shape your Digital future. It also represents a different take on the issue of cybersecurity than workshops that have typically been included in IGF and have traditionally focused on awareness raising and capacity building.
It is nevertheless critical to this audience: the discussions around behavior of states online cannot remain in the realm of the diplomats alone, but need to include and be shaped by the civil society and the industry. The session will provide an opportunity to provide input into an initiative started by Microsoft to shape the government debate, as well as give space to government stakeholders involved in the discussions to present their views and state of play.

Tag 1: Cybersecurity Norms
Tag 2: Confidence building measures
Tag 3: Digital Geneva Convention

Interventions:
Speakers have been chosen to reflect their expertise in the debate on cybersecurity norms, as well as their different viewpoints, given that they come from different background both in terms of sector and geography. That diversity will help stimulate the discussion and provide a broad range of perspectives to the audience.
All the speakers will be initially given 5 minutes to present their views through a managed set of questions and answers with the moderator, to ensure the audience is brought up to speed with the debate on the subject. Thereafter the moderator will ensure that they are given an opportunity to answer in a balanced manner.

Diversity:
This workshop aims to gather a variety of stakeholders to raise awareness of the importance of the multistakeholder dialogue in cybersecurity norms discussion, a debate that has typically been limited to the domain of nation states. To this end, we will seek to ensure that civil society is represented, as is academia and industry, as well as participants that bring different government perspectives to the table.
Efforts will be made to introduce new perspectives in the dialogue which have not been heard in Internet governance discussions. Special attention will be made throughout the planning of the session to ensure diverse interventions from workshop participants can be facilitated through the break-out group discussion and organizers will encourage and incorporate remote participation on social media.
Gender balance has been encouraged through speaker choices and each speaker will bring unique expertise and experience to the topics discussed.

Onsite Moderator: Duncan Hollis
Online Moderator: Kaja Ciglic, Tereza Horejsova
Rapporteur: Jessica Zucker

Online Participation:
The online moderator will work closely with the on-site moderator to prepare the session ahead of time, ensuring that they are aware of the questions and the topic areas that will be raised in the room. The online moderator will also facilitate discussion ahead of the event, requesting questions and driving engagement and interest in the session on social media platforms, such as Twitter and LinkedIn, as well as on the websites and events or other activities of the co-organizers. The online moderator will generate interest in the weeks prior to the event through a targeted social media campaign, leveraging Twitter hashtags and blog posts.  During the session itself, the moderator will facilitate the discussion online, highlighting the key points raised, as well as responding to questions received online and ensuring that they are raised in the room.  Online attendees will have a separate queue and microphone, which will rotate equally with the mics in the room. Following the session, the speakers will all be available for a moderated Q&A on Twitter.

Discussion facilitation:
The panel participants have been carefully selected for their expertise to allow the discussion to be grounded in the most up to date information. After their initial intervention, the moderator will actively seek to gather feedback and questions from the audience to ensure that participation in the discussion is as broad as possible and questions or concerns from the audience are addressed. As debates around cybersecurity norms have largely remained in the domain of nation states, a forum such as IGF presents a unique opportunity to gather voices from civil society, academia and the private sector to move the needle forward.
To enable effecting discussion, the following will be ensured:
- Additional reading materials will be shared ahead of the discussion and handouts will be developed for the session highlighting key aspects of the debate on international cybersecurity norms
- Organizers will moderate an online discussion through blog posts and social media in the weeks leading to the event to gather input and questions that spark particular interest
- PowerPoint summarizing key points of the panel’s intervention will be projected to facilitate conversations with members of the audience whose native language is not English
- The moderator selected will be an expert not only in the topic, but well versed in leading multi-stakeholder discussions and will actively encourage participation from the audience. He will work closely with the online moderator to ensure those audiences are equally brought into the debate.

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: No
Link to Report: 

Additional Reference Document Link: http://www.esteri.it/mae/resource/doc/2017/04/declaration_on_cyberspace.pdf

Agenda: 

-        The session will begin with an introduction and background on the topic by the moderator (Duncan Hollis). Mr. Hollis will frame the discussion and discuss the format of the roundtable. (5 min)

-        Next 3 speakers will provide brief introductory remarks intended to provide context on the topic in order to frame the roundtable discussion (15 minutes)

o   Paul Nicholas (5 minutes)

o   Ben Hiller (5 minutes)

o   Konstantinos Komaitis (5 minutes)

-        Following the opening remarks, the moderator will facilitate the roundtable conversation with the speakers and resource personnel touching on the following topics (65 minutes)

o   The progress on cybersecurity norms discussions to date

o   The Digital Geneva Convention proposal and the forms it could take

o   Potential challenges in development and implementation

o   Lessons learned from non-ICT fields, drawing upon other processes and experiences of other Geneva based organizations

-        The moderator will have 10 minutes to sum-up discussion and close session.

 

...

Session Organizers
JZ

Jessica Zucker

Cybersecurity Strategist, Microsoft


Tuesday December 19, 2017 10:40 - 12:10
Room XXI - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

10:40

Fast Tracking Digital Dividends for Women in CASA (WS251)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Maria Beebe
Proposer's Organization: TechNation Afghanistan, Global Networks
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Shabana Mansoory
Co-Proposer's Organization: TechWomen Afghanistan
Co-Organizers: Ms. Maria Beebe and Ms. Shabana Mansoory

Session Format: Panel/Break-out Group Discussion - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: Afghanistan
Stakeholder Group: Private Sector

Co-Proposer:
Country: USA
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Moderators: 
Onsite:
Ms. Maria Beebe, Co-founder at TechAfghanistan 
Mr. Omar Mansoor Ansari, President at TechNation (Afghanistan)

Online Moderator:
Sidra Jalil

Rapporteur:
Shabana Mansory

Speakers:
Country Speakers:
Tajikistan - Zuhra Halimova, Visiting Scholar at the Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University, andMavzuna Abdurakhmanova, Program Coordinator, Open Society Institute (OSI) Tajikistan Kyrgyzstan - Zarina Chekirbaeva, Executive Director at American Chamber of Commerce in the Kyrgyzstan
Afghanistan - 
Shabana Mansoory, TechWomen Afghanistan
Pakistan - Sidra Jalil, Program Manager, Code for Pakistan
Nepal - Dikchya Raut
India - Amrita Choudhury

Resource Speakers: 
mCade Strategies - Marilyn Cade
Ustad Mobile - Benita Rowe
Microsoft/Telecommunications and Internet Governance - Melissa Sassi
TetraTech - Nilmini Rubin
CLDP/ DoC - Joseph Gattuso
Facebook - Ankhi Das
Digital CASA - Rajendra Singh and/or Digital CASA resource speaker  
EMPTREC - Fiorina Mugione/Lorenzo Tosini
IBM - Cathey Rogers (invited)
MasterCard Foundation - Manu Bhardwaj (invited)
USAID - Jordan Sellman (invited)
DotAsia - Jennifer Chung (invited) 
Internet Society (ISOC) - Jane Coffin/Joyce Dogniez (invited)
IEEE - Karen McCabe (invited)

Content of the Session:
This proposal is made by TechNation, a Kabul-based technology and entrepreneurship support company, with the support from its programs, TechWomen Afghanistan, and TechWomen.Asia. “Fast Tracking Digital Dividends for Women in Central Asia and South Asia (CASA)” workshop. The workshop explores digital solutions shaped for and by women in the CASA region that already show initial impact on economic growth, creation of paid work (jobs), new kinds of services (such as, e-health, e-agriculture, other socially relevant applications), and that have potential for scalability to broaden impact to benefit women in the CASA countries. Country speakers will present case studies that examine the link between (a) quality of access to the Internet and related technologies and (b) quality of foundations for a digital economy, including (1) regulations and publicpolicies of national governments that allow firms to connect and to compete, (2) digital skills that are needed to leverage uses of technology, and (3) institutions/organizations that are capable and accountable. Moreover, the country speakers will examine the level of digital development of their country (emerging, transitioning or transforming) and determine whether policies match the needed progress and the level of achievement. 

The session will open with an introduction of the concept of “digital dividends,” based on the World Bank report and other research, with a focus on women. An “expert” speaker will be invited to “set the stage.” Country speakers will present case studies that examine the link between (a) quality of access to the Internet and related technologies and (b) quality of foundations for a digital economy, The speakers and general participants will then break into small groups (by sectoral interests) to brainstorm and highlight digital development strategies that are broader than ICT strategies that could be scaled within and between countries. Rapporteurs will be assigned to each breakout group, as recording and real time transcription is not available to breakout groups. A template approach will be used to capture each group’s ideas and suggestions.

At the end of the session, the groups come back together to summarize their small group discussions and the invited “resource speakers” will suggest ideas for next steps in the scaling up of the case studies or pilot projects, as a way of shaping women’s digital future in CASA and accelerating progress. The workshop participants will further explore the link between the workshop topic about fast-tracking digital dividends for women and by women to the overall IGF2017 main theme of Shaping Your Internet.

Background: Women make almost half of the population in CASA (49.8%). In Central Asia, the percent of female population is: 48.46% in Afghanistan, 49.39% in Tajikistan, 50.83% in Uzbekistan, 50.84% in Turkmenistan, 51.72% in Kazakhstan, and 50.53% in Kyrgyzstan. In South Asia, the percent of female population is: Pakistan: 48.63, India: 48.16, Bangladesh: 49.51, Sri Lanka: 51.75, Nepal: 51.54, Bhutan: 46.26, and Maldives: 49.85. Majority of these women live below the poverty line, do not have access to education, sustainable livelihoods, and technologies. Access to internet is considered a luxury, rather than a basic human right. Issues such as digital literacy, local technologies, local content, poor infrastructure, cost of bandwidth, quality of service and inadequate policies are shared problems in the region. Yet, pilot programs and initiatives abound for discussion, information exchange, and sharing good practices, even lessons learned from failures. Thus, the workshop objective of sharing good practices across CASA in fast tracking digital dividends is consistent with the IGF’s commitment of bringing a diverse group of stakeholders from a geographic region to discuss shaping your Internet.

Relevance of the Session:
The workshop objective of sharing good practices across Central Asia and South Asia (CASA) in fast tracking digital dividends is consistent with the IGF’s commitment of bringing a diverse group of stakeholders from a geographic region to discuss shaping your Internet. The workshop will explore policies that are matched to the level of digital development: at the emerging level where foundations are laid for digital adoption; at the transitioning level where everyone is enabled to take advantage of new technologies; and at the transforming level where digital dividends are shown in faster growth, more jobs, and better services.

Tag 1: Gender Issues
Tag 2: Digital Future
Tag 3: Enhanced cooperation

Interventions:
The Overview of the Workshop and Introduction of Digital Dividends Framework (5-10 minutes). Speakers will frame their discussion on the link between (a) quality of access to the Internet and related technologies and (b) quality of regulations that allow firms to connect and to compete, skills that leverage technology, and institutions that are capable and accountable. And then they can drill down on their specific project or initiative that focused on (a) skills that leverage technology and the impact on job creation OR (b) institution building and the impact on service delivery OR (c) advocating for regulation (if NGO) or regulatory policy (if govt) and the impact on productivity, etc. (Each speaker will have 5 minutes each x 4 speakers = 20 minutes) then participate in one of four break out groups by sectoral interest (30 minute in depth discussion). Virtual break our groups as well. Report back and recommendations = 30 minutes). Total time = 90 minutes

Diversity:
Diversity is reflected as follows: The speakers are all female, geographic diversity - speakers are from Afghanistan, UAE, Pakistan and the U.S. representing civil society, technical community, public policy from a private sector perspective, with some wearing multiple stakeholder hats. 

Online Participation:
We will use Webex provided by the IGF secretariat. The online moderator will participate in the training to be provided by IGF and facilitate remote participation. Prior to the actual session at IGF, we will host online sessions and promote the workshop via social media so additional people can join in. We will ask the remote participants to add to the knowledge base. We will select a few venues in several of the Central and South Asian countries where people can have access and connect with the session online in real time. The illustrative venues are: Kabul at TechNation’s office, Pakistan’s Code for Pakistan facility, Facebook India and World Pulse. At each of these venues, the participants will be provided with a moderator who can set the stage and facilitate the group’s remote participation, including their own break- out session or remote participation in one of the break-out groups. The remote participants will share the recommendations arising out of their break-out session for inclusion in the action planning discussion.

Discussion facilitation:
Effective facilitation of a discussion involves the recognition and employment of different perspectives and different skills to create an inclusive environment. Discussion is a powerful mechanism for active learning; a well-facilitated discussion allows the participant to explore new ideas while recognizing and valuing the contributions of others. Discussion facilitation will include: 1. Creating an inclusive environment; 2. Keeping discussions constructive and positive; 3. Encouraging participants.

Conduc

...

Session Organizers
avatar for Maria Beebe

Maria Beebe

Advisor, TechNation
Maria Beebe, Ph.D. is an applied sociolinguist whose research interests include critical discourse analysis, women’s leadership, and information communication technologies (ICTs) for development. She acts as advisor to TechNation to develop new initiatives in ICTs. As an outcome... Read More →



Tuesday December 19, 2017 10:40 - 12:10
Room XI - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

11:00

Surveillance from the Margins (WS184)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Hija Kamran
Proposer's Organization: Digital Rights Foundation
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Nighat Dad
Co-Proposer's Organization: Digital Rights Foundation
Co-Organizers:
Ms., Hija, KAMRAN, Civil society, Digital Rights Foundation
Ms., Nighat, DAD, Civil Society, Digital Rights Foundation

Session Format: Panel - 60 Min

Proposer:
Country: Pakistan
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Co-Proposer:
Country: Pakistan
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speaker: Nighat Dad
Speaker: Amalia Toledo
Speaker: Alexandrine Pirlot de Corbion
Speaker: Joana Varon
Speaker: Lisa Garcia
Speaker: David Kaye

Content of the Session:
Surveillance is not a uniform experience, be it surveillance by the state, companies or social actors. The gendered nature of surveillance and the different forms it takes given the positionality of the person experiencing it is particularly glaring when experienced by members of a particular gender or a marginalised community. Sometimes surveillance is discriminatory per se, in that it is directed specifically at people because of their gender, race, class, disability, sexual orientation, etc. For instance, phishing attacks experienced human rights activists or offline and on-the-ground-surveillance of journalists covering controversial topics. In other instances, facially non-discriminatory surveillance is experienced differently by certain individuals because of their marginality and positionality through the disparate impact that it has. It is the second form of surveillance that is often left undiscussed and the intersectionality of race, class, gender, religion, sexual orientation and ability is unexamined.

The purpose of this panel is not only to map and understand the diversified experiences of surveillance but to take these findings regarding the diffused nature of surveillance and work towards actively finding solutions to the particular kinds of surveillance experienced by marginalised groups. The aim of the discussion will also be mainstream discourse from the margins at a global level.

Relevance of the Session:
The different experiences of surveillance are important to recognize in mainstream discourse around surveillance. Digital Rights Foundation has conducted a research on the gendered surveillance experienced by female journalists in Pakistan. Most journalists reported that the nature of the threats and surveillance that they receive takes on a gendered form. During the research, we discovered that there is also an intersectionality of class and minority status in the experience of journalists.

In other online spaces, women and LGBT communities experience heightened social surveillance. This surveillance has the effect of monitoring and modifying certain behaviors and the expression of these groups. The social dynamics of surveillance and the different effects that it has on different groups can only come forth through experiential knowledge and discussions such as the one proposed here.

Digital Rights Foundation is already engaged in critical work that seeks to map and understand the differentiated impact of surveillance. The session will not only feed into that work, but will allow us to partner with others working from the periphery to work towards campaigns and literature that mainstreams this discourse.Furthermore, DRF hopes to take the findings from the panel and its on-going research and turn this topic into a report to be published a few months after the conference.

Tag 1: Surveillance
Tag 2: Access and Diversity
Tag 3: Digital Rights

Interventions:
The panel will consist of a discussion that will start with the perspectives of each panelist and then move on to an interactive debate on the issues of surveillance and its diverse impact. The latter part of the discussion shall also include a question and answer session. At the same time, the discussion will be broadcast online to get the perspective of a wider range of people.

The total time of the panel shall be 60 minutes. The first 40 minutes shall be assigned to the speakers who will be allotted a time of 7 minutes each to present their prepared point of view. Then the last 20 minutes of the discussion will move on to a debate initiated by the moderator, but will involve questions and cross-questions from the speakers (10 minutes) and the audience (10 minutes).

Diversity:
Digital Rights Foundation advocates for diversity in all of its activities. This panel seeks to bring together speakers from different communities and representatives of marginalised communities to share their experiences of surveillance and the address the unacknowledged silences within surveillance discourse. This panel will include activists from different parts of the world, working with marginalised communities and the inequalities that inhere in the digital realm.

The provisionally confirmed speakers include Alexandrine Pirlot de Corbion leads Privacy International’s strategic programme and has worked on fighting for the right to privacy, has researched on issues related to human rights, irregular migration, gender, conflict management, and human security. Anja Kovacs who directs Internet Democracy India, and works for an Internet that supports free speech, democracy and social justice in India and beyond. Courtney Radsch is the Advocacy Director at Committee to Protect Journalists. She is a journalist, researcher, and free expression advocate with more than 13 years of experience in the United States and the Middle East. Nighat Dad heads Digital Rights Foundation, and is the champion of women’s rights to access the internet safely in Pakistan. And Lisa Garcia serves as a Professor in the Charles and Louise Travers Department of Political Science at UC Berkeley. Her current projects include an analysis of how technology can facilitate voter mobilization among voters of color in California and a historical exploration of the race, gender, and class inequality at the heart of the founding of California's public school system.

Onsite Moderator: Alexandrine Pirlot de Corbion
Online Moderator: Hija Kamran
Rapporteur: Hija Kamran

Online Participation:
The online participation at DRF’s session will be closely monitored by the onsite and online moderators, encouraging remote participants to make their voices count in the discussion. The participation will be done via online media like Facebook and Twitter and also any other medium recommended by the IGF team. DRF has encouraged online participation in its previous sessions as well, including the conferences we organised in the home country where the proposed online moderator was specially trained to manage active participation by those attending remotely.

Discussion facilitation:
The onsite moderator along with the present team of DRF will be responsible to facilitate maximum participation by those attending, on-ground and remotely.

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: No
Link to Report: 

Additional Reference Document Link: http://digitalrightsfoundation.pk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Surveillance-of-Female-Journalists-in-Pakistan.pdf


Agenda: 

Surveillance is not a uniform experience, be it surveillance by the state, companies or social actors. The gendered nature of surveillance and the different forms it takes given the positionality of the person experiencing it is particularly glaring when experienced by members of a particular gender or a marginalised community. Sometimes surveillance is discriminatory per se, in that it is directed specifically at people because of their gender, race, class, disability, sexual orientation, etc. For instance, phishing attacks experienced human rights activists or offline and on-the-ground-surveillance of journalists covering controversial topics. In other instances, facially non-discriminatory surveillance is experienced differently by certain individuals because of their marginality and positionality through the disparate impact that it has. It is the second form of surveillance that is often left undiscussed and the intersectionality of race, class, gender, religion, sexual orientation and ability is unexamined.

The purpose of this panel is not only to map and understand the diversified experiences of surveillance but to take these findings regarding the diffused nature of surveillance and work towards actively finding solutions to the particular kinds of surveillance experienced by marginalised groups. The aim of the discussion will also be mainstream discourse from the margins at a global level.

The panel will consist of a discussion that will start with the perspectives of each panelist and then move on to an interactive debate on the issues of surveillance and its diverse impact. The latter part of the discussion shall also include a question and answer session. At the same time, the discussion will be broadcast online to get the perspective of a wider range of people.

The total time of the panel shall be 60 minutes. The first 40 minutes shall be assigned to the speakers who will be allotted a time of 7 minutes each to present their prepared point of view. Then the last 20 minutes of the discussion will move on to a debate initiated by the moderator, but will in

...

Session Organizers
avatar for Hija Kamran

Hija Kamran

Researcher and Communications Manager, Digital Rights Foundation


Tuesday December 19, 2017 11:00 - 12:00
Room XXII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

11:20

Internet of Things : Supportive Role of Smart Solutions in the Decision Making Process (WS202)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Nirvana Farrag
Proposer's Organization: The Egyptian Cabinet Information & Decision Support Center-IDSC
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Heba Abd ElHamid
Co-Proposer's Organization: The Egyptian Cabinet Information & Decision Support Center-IDSC
Co-Organizers:
Mr. Menghestab Haile
Country Director - Egypt, World Food Programme (WFP) Cairo, Egypt

Dr. Jimson Olufuye
Chair of AFICTA

Session Format: Round Table - 60 Min

Proposer:
Country: Egypt
Stakeholder Group: Government

Co-Proposer:
Country: Egypt
Stakeholder Group: Government

Speaker: Menghestab Haile
Speaker: Jimson Olufuye
Speaker: Atef ElShabrawy
Speaker: Mostafa Fathi
Speaker: Hoda Dahroug 

Nowadays, we are living in a world where virtually everything — from cellphones and cars to washing machines — is connected. Physical objects are connecting to networks, communicating with devices and sensors, and creating and sharing data to build the “Internet of Things (IoT)”. In reality, the IoT is much more than smart homes and connected appliances. It is about creating new ways of helping people and organizations in advancing their lives in a digital age. This global connectivity between the Internet and devices presents governments and organizations with tremendous opportunities to reduce operating costs, increase employee productivity, enhance citizen experiences, improve agency connectivity, and accelerate meaningful innovation.
The main aim of the workshop is to address the impact of Internet of Things and smart solutions in enabling the decision making process through various technical, social, economic and political perspectives. The workshop will attempt to highlight how Internet of Things tools can have a significant role in shaping the digital future of the human life through greater connectivity and ultimate functionality.
In order for decision-makers to meet the aspirations of nations, they need to pay attention to the role of IoT tools in impacting performance since IoT goes hand in hand with efficiency, transparency and accountability. Decision makers need to learn the importance of embracing data-driven decision making through the engagement of various multi-stakeholders. in addition, decision-making is now based on a combination of our knowledge, experience, intuition, and data. Data-driven decision-making is accurate, on time, valuable, and actionable data.
In formulating the digital future of the human life -especially in developing nations-, welfare and prosperity can be achieved through the use of modern day technologies such as medical treatment databases, cell phones to improve livelihoods, and computers to enable ability the citizens to compete for online jobs in the global market. In this context, governments can become closer to its people through the use of information technology and communications and utilizing smart solutions to increase efficiency and help in making their lives better.
Whilst ICTs are generally adaptable; their effectiveness in addressing development issues still depends on utilizing smart solutions and the Internet of Things tools to encourage a healthy and regulatory environment.

The workshop will address the impact of internet of things and smart solutions on the decision making process through the following questions:

  1.  What are the challenges and barriers facing our digital future and its impact on the decision making process?   
  2. Give examples of how the internet of things can impact decision makers?
  3. What the roles of decision makers in developing internet of things policies?
  4. How far IOT help advancing and sustaining and improving the standards of living of people?
  5. How can smart solutions support all stakeholders in the decision making process?

Relevance of the Session:
The workshop will tackle the role of Internet of Things in shaping the digital future since the Internet of Things is shaping human life with greater connectivity and ultimate functionality, and all this is happening through networking to the Internet where no limits exist to what can be connected to the Internet. Internet of Things can begin to reach its full potential—especially if leaders truly embrace data-driven decision making. 
Tag 1: Internet of Things
Tag 2: Digital Future
Tag 3: Multistakeholder
Interventions:
The workshop will include speakers from multistakeholders various backgrounds in order to provide diverse inputs and opinions about the supportive role of smart solutions in the decision making process and the international best practices in the Internet of Things.

Diversity:
The speakers represent different organizations including international organizations working in international development, government entities concerned with information technology and communication, african institutions working in the field of ICT from a regional perspective. Gender balance is taken into consideration in selecting the speakers for the workshop. The proposed speakers represent geographical, gender and multi-stakeholders (government, international organizations, independent consultant, private sector, etc.)

Onsite Moderator: Mr. Menghestab Haile
Online Moderator: Ms. Iman Mahdy
Rapporteur: Ms. Hoda Salah

Online Participation:
Online participation will be available during the workshop to enable participants from different countries who did not have the opportunity to participate in person in IGF 2017 to engage in the discussions and share their views about the topic. Remote participants are encouraged to send their questions/comments and the speakers will respond and interact accordingly. They will have the opportunity to interact on an equal basis with those from in-room participants. 
Discussion facilitation:
Speakers will present their speech/presentations in 5 minutes (each). Presentations will be followed by an open discussion where participants are welcomed to comment and interact in the workshop (30 min.)
The workshop will be concluded by a wrap up covering the key questions raised during the session (5 min.)

Workshop Format

The workshop will take the format of a moderated roundtable discussion which will give both the speakers and the participants from different backgrounds and expertise the opportunity to get together in an interactive setting where all views and ideas can be shared equally. This format is useful in raising multiple questions and in engaging in meaningful dialogue while the moderator will work to ensure that critical elements of the engagements are documented and shared afterwards. The workshop will depend on the role of the moderation in posing different questions to the speakers and the audience and lead the participants in agreeing to the discussion points.

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: Yes

Additional Speakers: 

Mrs. Estherine Fotabong, NEPAD's Director of Programme Implementation and Coordination

Estherine Lisinge-Fotabong is the Director of the Programme Implementation and Coordination Directorate of the NEPAD Planning and Coordinating Agency (NPCA). Before that, she was the UNEP Country Liaison Officer for South Africa and the Environment Adviser to the NEPAD Secretariat. Before joining UNEP, she held several positions including: Assistant Lecturer in Law at the University of Soa, Yaoundé, Cameroon; Director of Policy and Strategy; WWF Central African Regional Programme Office – Biodiversity and NEPAD Programme Officer with UNEP-DGEF. Mrs. Fotabong has a Master’s degree in Law as well as in International Affairs specializing in International Policy and Practice.

Mrs. Dalia Salem, Head of the European Sector, Egyptian Ministry of International Cooperation

Agenda: 

Organizer: The Egyptian Cabinet Information and Decision Support Center (IDSC)

Co-organizer:  World Food Programme (WFP) in Cairo, Egypt & AFICTA

Format: The workshop will take the format of a moderated roundtable discussion which will give both the speakers and the participants from different backgrounds and expertise the opportunity to get together in an interactive setting where all views and ideas can be shared equally. This format is useful in raising multiple questions and in engaging in meaningful dialogue while the moderator will work to ensure that critical elements of the engagements are documented and shared afterwards. The workshop will depend on the role of the moderation in posing different questions to the speakers and the audience and lead the participants in agreeing to the discussion points.

Duration: 60 minutes

Forum Host    Ms. Nirvana Farrag, Director General, International Cooperation Department-the Egyptian Cabinet Information and Decision Support Center, IDSC (5 min)

Speakers: (35 min. - sorted alphabetically)

Speakers represent different organizations including international organizations working in international development, government entities concerned with information technology and communication, African institutions working in the field of ICT from a regional perspective. Gender balance is taken into consideration in selecting the speakers for the workshop. The proposed speakers represent geographical, gender and multi-stakeholders (government, international organizations, indepen

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Session Organizers

Tuesday December 19, 2017 11:20 - 12:20
Room XXIII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

11:50

Bridging digital divides through cybersecurity capacity building (WS100)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Sophie Tomlinson
Proposer's Organization: ICC BASIS
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Timea Suto
Co-Proposer's Organization: ICC BASIS
Co-Organizers:
Mr Belisario Contreras, Inter-governmental Organization, Organization of American States Ms Sophie Tomlinson, Private Sector, ICC BASIS Ms Carolin Weisser, Civil Society, Oxford Martin School Global Cybersecurity Capacity Centre


Session Format: Break-out Group Discussions - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: France
Stakeholder Group: Private Sector

Co-Proposer:
Country: France
Stakeholder Group: Private Sector

Speaker: Audrey Plonk
Speaker: Sadie Creese
Speaker: Belisario Contreras
Speaker: Carmen Gonsalves
Speaker: Lillian Nalwoga

Content of the Session:
Internet Governance issue:
First-time users and certain demographics (e.g. children, women) are most often confronted with the impact of cybercrime, cyberbullying and other cyber risks. Those groups, in particular, but all Internet users need to be able to identify those risks and manage threats effectively to take advantage of the opportunities that the Internet offers. Increased awareness about cybersecurity and knowledge about how to protect themselves can strengthen not only the individual and the communities but also the ability of a whole country to protect critical digital infrastructure and combat cyber threats. The maturity of cybersecurity capacity in a country encourages confidence in the online environment and fosters meaningful access by all groups in society, thus helping address digital divides. There is a broad agreement that collaboration between stakeholders to mitigate potential threats and foster access is crucial for this effort.

The purpose of this workshop is to bring together cybersecurity experts from different stakeholder groups to raise awareness of ongoing multistakeholder partnerships in cybersecurity capacity building efforts globally. The workshop will look forward to the digital future and discuss opportunities for scaling up these efforts and leverage their learnings to address implementation challenges in cybersecurity capacity building, an essential dimension for bridging digital divides.

Session format:
Through break-group discussions the workshop will provide an opportunity for stakeholders to meet one another, share experiences and identify opportunities for cross-border collaboration. The break-out group discussion will facilitate sharing of best practices and lessons learned from deploying cybersecurity capacity building initiatives. These will be collected and shared in the workshop report as a tool for those aiming to launch such initiatives in the future.

Agenda:
• The workshop will open with discussion between experts and participants on the importance and impact of cybersecurity capacity building efforts taking place around the world. (20 minutes)
- Experts will be asked to highlight in their remarks how developing countries can utilise private sector expertise, and work with the technical community and civil society to address goals and provide examples of forums/initiatives where this is taking place.
• Participants will be invited to split into groups and will be asked to:
- Share their views and experiences on existing initiatives they participated in, know of or helped launch.
- Survey examples of where cybersecurity capacity building has helped bridge digital divides.
- Evaluate opportunities and challenges faced.
At least two experts will lead each break-out group and co-organisers will explore the use of a hand-out (with specific questions) for each break-out group to facilitate discussion. (30 minutes).
• Through an interactive discussion, all participants will then have the opportunity to:
- Report back on their break-out group discussion
- Identify mechanisms and initiatives that can be leveraged for international multistakeholder cooperation.
The moderator will have 3 minutes to sum-up discussion and close session (40 minutes).


Relevance of the Session:
The workshop will be directly related to the IGF 2017 theme as cybersecurity is increasingly important to ensure everyone’s digital future is safe and empowering. There are many multistakeholder initiatives taking place around the world to support capacity building (such as the Global Forum on Cyber Expertise) but often little knowledge of where countries can go to exchange knowledge/views with relevant stakeholders and experts. The workshop will provide an opportunity to share global best practices and help stakeholders address the opportunities and challenges they are facing nationally to ensure the digital future is secure and accessible for all. 

Tag 1: Cybersecurity
Tag 2: Access and Diversity
Tag 3: Multistakeholder Cooperation

Interventions:
Speakers have been chosen to ensure geographic, gender, sector, and stakeholder group diversity.

Moderator

-         Dominique Lazanski, GSMA

Speakers

-         Belisario Contreras, Organization of American States

-         Lillian Nalwoga, ISOC Uganda (remote speaker)

-         Sadie Creese, Global Cyber Security Capacity Centre, University of Oxford

-         Audrey Plonk, Intel

-         Carmen Gonsalves, Netherlands Government

 

Online Moderator

-         Timea Suto, ICC BASIS

Rapporteur

-         Stephanie MacLellan, Centre for International Governance Innovation

 

 


Diversity:
This workshop aims to gather a variety of stakeholders to raise awareness of ongoing multistakeholder partnerships in cybersecurity capacity building efforts globally. Each stakeholder group will be represented and speakers will represent different geographies and cultures to provide varied policy perspectives and a menu of different arenas where cybersecurity expertise is available.

Co-organizers will share different perspectives and represent different stakeholder groups and geographies.

Gender balance has been encouraged through speaker choices and each speaker will bring unique expertise and experience to the topics discussed.

Special attention will be made during the planning of the session to ensure diverse interventions from workshop participants can be facilitated through the break-out group discussion and organisers will encourage remote participation by promoting the workshop on social media.

Organisers will explore facilitating the intervention of a remote hub in a developing country. This could be arranged by sending a remote hub prepared questions to be discussed in the break-out groups and have them report on their ideas during the session.

During the break-out group discussion diverse experts/speakers will be assigned to each group help animate discussion and ensure different perspectives are raised.

Organizers will build on experience organizing break-out groups in the past and special attention will be made throughout the planning of the session to ensure diverse interventions from workshop participants can be facilitated in person and remotely. Organizers will also encourage remote participation on social media.


Onsite Moderator: Dominique Lazanski, GSMA 
Online Moderator: Timea Suto, ICC BASIS 
Rapporteur: Stephanie MacLellan, Centre for International Governance Innovation 

Online Participation:
The remote moderator will be involved throughout workshop planning to provide guidance on where remote participation will need to be facilitated.

The moderator will frequently communicate with the remote moderator throughout the session to ensure remote participants’ views/questions are reflected in the discussion and the remote moderator will raise her hand when an online participant wishes to make an intervention.

Organisers will ensure that the workshop is promoted in advance to the wider community to give remote participants the opportunity to prepare questions and interventions in advance and to generate interest in the workshop. Organizers will also ensure the workshop is promoted on the ICC BASIS website and via social media.

During the break-out group discussion the remote moderator will manage the discussion online with one of the speakers. This will ensure remote participants are given the opportunity to communicate with an expert directly. Remote participants will be asked if they would like to provide a remote intervention in the final section to brief the group on what was discussed. This will help ensure equal online participation.

As noted above, organizers will also explore including a remote hub in the discussion.

Discussion facilitation:
The list below provides examples of the ways discussion will be facilitated amongst speakers, audience members, and online participants and ensure the session format is used to its optimum:

Seating: The speakers will sit up at the front of the room in a roundtable format for the first part of the discussion. This will help set the scene and provide an opening discussion to highlight key issues. Following the first section, speakers will sit amongst participants in break-out groups (number dependent on the number of participants) and remain in these groups for the rest of the session. There should be enough chairs

...

Session Organizers
avatar for Sophie Tomlinson

Sophie Tomlinson

Assistant Policy Manager, ICC BASIS
Sophie Tomlinson is the Assistant Policy Manager for the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) Commission on the Digital Economy and Business Action to Support the Information Society (BASIS) initiative. In that capacity, she manages ICC's policy development from the global business... Read More →


Tuesday December 19, 2017 11:50 - 13:20
Room IX - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

11:50

Internet of Things and Cyber Security: Will “Regulation” Save the day? (WS123)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Farzaneh Badiei
Proposer's Organization: Georgia Tech
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Tatiana Tropina
Co-Proposer's Organization: Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law
Co-Organizers:
Ms. Tatiana Tropina,Senior Researcher at Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law (in personal Capacity) Ms. Farzaneh Badiei, Executive Director at Internet Governance Project


Session Format: Debate - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: United States
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Co-Proposer:
Country: Germany
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speaker: Arthur van der Wees
Speaker: Tatiana Tropina
Speaker: Milton Mueller
Speaker: Maarten Botterman
Speaker: Mr. O'Donohue, European Commission
Moderator: Arthur Rizer

Content of the Session:
The massive deployment of networked devices and sensors, many of them aimed at the consumer market, has created new kinds of security risks for the Internet. These risks were revealed following the 2016 Mirai botnet. Mirai is malware that scans the Internet for devices running default usernames and passwords and then controls these devices to make them participate in massive distributed denial of service attacks. Since many of the IoT devices are cheap, distributed en masse, and deployed by consumers who are not experts in ICT management, the rise of Internet of things is causing concern.
These IoT problems have prompted several computer security experts to call for government regulation to solve the problem. Bruce Schneier has written that “government is the only solution” and believes that “the government could impose security regulations on IoT manufacturers, forcing them to make their devices secure even though their customers don’t care.” Richard Clayton and Ross Anderson have also done work for the European Commission advocating an approach based on safety regulation. On the other hand, these calls for regulation are coming not from experts in political economy or regulatory institutions and processes, but from technical experts, who may not be familiar with some of the dilemmas, challenges and pitfalls of asserting government regulation. Regulatory initiatives pose many of the problems of jurisdictional fragmentation and cross-border divergence that often undermine the effectiveness of government on the internet. Regulation is also challenged by the “moving target” problem, i.e. rapid technological change in this area; it would not be unusual for regulations to be put into place that address a problem that no longer is relevant, while overlooking the new ones. Advocates of regulation also tend to fail to distinguish accurately between different legal and regulatory mechanisms. Liability lawsuits, for example, would not be classified as “regulation” by political economy experts, yet Schneier and security experts such as Brian Krebs put them both in the same basket. The application of liability laws to IoT vendors has certain parallels with the earlier debate over software liability, and is an issue to be explored.
This workshop would be framed as a debate between advocates and opponents of IoT “regulation.” However, the positions represented would not be divided into two simple, polar opposites (yes regulation or no regulation) but rather would explore a broader range of governance options for the emerging Internet of things. The workshop would bring together a range of expertise on cybersecurity-related technical issues; IoT business and technology development; political economy and policy related to regulation and regulatory institutions; and law and economics expertise related to liability in high-tech sectors.


Relevance of the Session:
There is a little doubt that IoT security - and the question of achieving it - is one of the key issues for the Internet development in the short and medium term, and, therefore, one of the very important topics for the Internet governance. The challenge of IoT security is not only a problem of securing cheap mass distributed devices, but as we explained in the proposal also a bigger issue of the choice between less or more regulation - and therefore, the issues of multi-stakeholder participation in this choice, - the question of consumer trust and user-centric security approaches. Therefore, IoT security touches many dimensions of the Internet governance from a broader perspective and has a potential to shape many of the debates in the future .



Tag 1: Cybersecurity
Tag 2: IoT
Tag 3: Regulation

Interventions:
The panel will include experts in regulation and tech, who will represent different stakeholder groups - business, civil society, technical community and others. This will allow us to discuss different dimension of the problem and explore more options than just bipolar question “yes or no to IoT security regulation”. The session would rely on the strong Q&A moderation with the moderator setting the scene and asking questions related to the perspectives of a particular panellist. Some discussants believe that IoT regulation is needed, some believe it is not needed and some believe it might be needed in the future. These perspectives will be discussed and the participant's views will be included as well. We aim to open the session for wider participation from the very beginning, asking everyone to make an intervention on IoT security and regulatory options. This will allow for an interactive discussion.



Diversity:
The proposed set of panelists represents geographical, gender and stakeholder balance: the submitters of this proposal invited representatives from the technical community, civil society organisations, business (we are going to invite representatives from Dyn), and European Commission. In addition to stakeholder diversity, we have a gender diversity, as at least three of the invited speakers are female, and there will be more invited. The panel represents a geographical balance with panelists invited from different regions.



Online Moderator: 
Rapporteur: Karim Farhat

Online Participation:
Internet Governance Project will use Twitter for disseminating information about the workshop and the available remote participation facilities provided by IGF. It will also provide a remote participation sign up sheet on its website to give information to the participants that want to attend remotely. It will encourage the remote participants of the workshop to sign up to a Skype group to discuss the workshop topic before, during and after the workshop. During the session, the remote participants comments will be given priority over those participating in person. Following the design of other successful and effective remote participation facilitation, all the participants in the room are encouraged at the beginning of the workshop to log into the WebEX room and follow remote participation discussion in WebEX chat. This way remote participants will be able to interact with various people present in the room. The people in the room will be encouraged to queue up to make comments in the WebEX room.


Discussion facilitation:
As explained in details in the other parts of this proposal, the discussion facilitation will strive to achieve the most interactivity of the session and to bring together different perspectives in the intense debate by:
Strong moderation of the debate with moderator asking questions to both panel and the audience, trying to summarise the discussion at different points and provoke both the speakers and the audience to address different aspects of the issue
Inclusion every participant into the debate
Asking all the participants - including both speakers and audience members - to intervene with statements that reflect position on the issues being discussed or to address earlier interventions. All those who participate can ask questions not only to the panel, but to each other as well


Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: Yes
Link to Report: https://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/filedepot_download/4098/295


Agenda: 

1. Moderator sets the scene and introduces the participants and mentions the issues that will be discussed

2. IoT implications for cybersecurity and why it should be regulated?

The debaters who are "for" regulatiton of IoT and believe there is need for regulation will put their arguments forward

3. The debaters  that do not think regulation is the optimal solution for IoT put their arguments forward

4. The moderater briefly mentions the "for" and "against"  arguments and then asks the "against" regulation debaters how cybersecurity should be maintained in IoT devices if regulation is not in place and asks the "for regulation" debaters to discuss what regulations should be in place.

5. Both sides debate the shortcomings of each others solutions

 

...

Session Organizers
avatar for Farzaneh Badiei

Farzaneh Badiei

Research Associate, Internet Governance Project at Georgia Tech
Farzaneh Badiei is a research associate at the Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Public Policy, and the Executive Director of Internet Governance Project (IGP). | | For the past 6 years, Farzaneh has been a part of Internet governance research and professional community... Read More →


Tuesday December 19, 2017 11:50 - 13:20
Room XXIV - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

11:50

Selective Persecution and the Mob: Hate and religion online (WS215)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Smitha Krishna Prasad
Proposer's Organization: Centre for Communication Governance at National Law University, Delhi
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Chinmayi Arun
Co-Proposer's Organization: Centre for Communication Governance at National Law University, Delhi
Co-Organizers:
Ms. Smitha, Krishna Prasad, Civil Society, Centre for Communication Governance at National Law University, Delhi
Ms. Gayatri Khandhadai, Civil Society, Association for Progressive Communications


Session Format: Panel - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: India
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Co-Proposer:
Country: India
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speaker: Gayathry Venkiteswaran
Speaker: Chinmayi Arun
Speaker: Carlos Affonso de Souza
Speaker: Grace Githaiga
Speaker: Wolfgang Schultz
Speaker: Susan Benesch 
Speaker: David Kaye


Content of the Session:
As hate speech online spreads at an alarming rate, states, companies, civil society and other stakeholders grapple with the question of how to mitigate the situation. States have relied on command-control regulation, including hate speech laws, as the primary solution. However, these laws are used to censor and punish political dissent and other expression protected under the ICCPR and most countries’ constitutions. These laws also seem to be able to do very little for the journalists being murdered, attacked and threatened for their online speech, or for people receiving onslaughts of threats, doxxing, abuse and other forms of aggression online.

In the global south especially, this is a phenomenon that cannot be ignored. Law regulating hate speech and religious expression has had serious consequences offline. It is often used to harass and intimidate media, bloggers, human rights defenders, women and political dissidents. These are the very same groups that the law should protect since they are often attacked online for their speech. Women are threatened with unspeakable violence and doxxed, bloggers and journalists are killed, and human rights defenders are frequently attacked. Both harmful speech and the law meant to mitigate it are used against these groups. There is therefore a need to study the reasons offered, such as religious sensitivities, more closely. This session focuses particularly on the intersection of expression and religion in the online space.

This session seeks an open discussion from the participants on the following issues:
A. What are the current and imminent threats relating to hate speech online?
B. What are the ways in which hate speech laws are used to target vulnerable speakers?
C. Is protected expression touching on religion under threat? If so, from whom and how do we tackle it?
D. Are hate speech and religion specific expression laws effective or acceptable when applied to online spaces?
E. How can we engage with the Rabat Action Plan and the Istanbul process to incorporate online and gender related challenges?
F. Are there opportunities to work out better ways in which online platforms can deal with hate speech, political censorship and other forms of intimidation of speakers online? Specifically, how can online platforms engage better with these issues in the Global South?


Relevance of the Session:
Hate speech and unreasonable restriction on speech online are a major threat to inclusive societies, and especially to democracies. In addition to stifling valuable, protected speech, they create an environment and culture of otherisation and intolerance. If the norms set down by the UDHR are to be protected online, we must cultivate an environment where differing views and choices are embraced online. 

Tag 1: Freedom of Expression
Tag 2: Inclusive Societies
Tag 3: Hate Speech

Diversity:
The panel has been designed carefully keeping in mind gender parity and equality. Further, the panel has also been designed to include individuals who work on domestic issues in different parts of the global South, as well as individuals who work on these issues within the international law framework to ensure that views from diverse jurisdictions across the world are brought forward and discussed. 

Onsite Moderator: Gayatri Khandhadai
Online Moderator: Smitha Krishna Prasad
Rapporteur: Deborah Brown

Online Participation:
Throughout the session #IGF2017 will be used and so will #hatespeech. APC will set up systems for anonymous and audience questions and comments to be streamed and displayed as the meeting progresses. APC will also solicit questions ahead of time from those who cannot attend in person, by publicizing the workshop on Twitter and with blog posts.

Throughout the session, a dedicated communications person will be available to facilitate online participation and to increase the visibility of the session and IGF among the networks of the co-organisers. This person will also be working on the visual aid for the whole session towards setting up the chart that identifies key issues raised.

Discussion facilitation:
The session will start with a 5 minute briefing by the moderator which captures the background and objectives of discussing the two ends of the spectrum of hate speech and religious speech, as well as the rules for the session. Each of the speakers will then spend about 5-6 minutes presenting their views on various issues that touch the topic of the session (as described in detail above in the section on interventions).

The moderator will tie the discussion into each of panelists chosen topics of discussion, to ensure the flow of the conversation.

For the next 35 minutes the moderator will open the floor to ask the participants and audience to point out the different areas including and outside the issues raised by the speakers on how hate speech and religion related rights are impacted by ICTs.

For the last 10 minutes, a chart will be drawn up identifying the different issues and linking them with the help of visual aid. This will be presented along with summaries of discussions to Mr. Ahmed Shaheed with a request to focus on technology and ICTs in his mandate as the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of religion or belief.


Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: Yes
Link to Report: http://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/filedepot_download/4098/266


Session Organizers

Tuesday December 19, 2017 11:50 - 13:20
Room XII - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

11:50

CyberBRICS: Building the Next Generation Internet, STEP by Step (WS261)

Proposer's Name: Dr. Luca Belli
Proposer's Organization: Center for Technology & Society at FGV

Co-Organizers:

  • Luca Belli, Academia, Center for Technology & Society at FGV
  • Alison Gillwald, civil society, Research ICT Africa
  • CyberBRICS Project, Multistakeholder

Session Format: Round Table - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: Brazil
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speakers:

  • Ms Alison Gillwald, civil society, Research ICT Africa, South Africa
  • Mr Benedicto Fonseca Filho, government, Brazilian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Brazil
  • Ms Elonnai Hickok, civil society, Center for Internet and Society India, India
  • Mr Luca Belli, academia, Center for Technology and Society at Fundação Getulio Vargas, Brazil
  • Mr Fang Xingdong, CEO of ChinaLabs, China and Dr Bu Zhong, Penn. State University
  • Mr Rashid Ismailov, government, Ministry of Telecommunications of Russia, Russia
  • Ms Tatiana Indina, private sector, Silicon Valley Innovation Center, and Russia Center for New Media and Society, Russia

 

Content of the Session:
BRICS countries (i.e. Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) are experiencing unprecedented change due to large-scale deployment of Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) and are intensifying efforts to become key players for the development of the future Internet. Increasingly recognized as a major scientific and economic bloc, BRICS seem determined not only to embrace ICTs but also to strengthen cooperation in order to shape the global technology field, as highlighted by the recent approval of a BRICS Science & Technology Enterprise Partnership (STEP).
The establishment of STEP shows that BRICS are not only promoting a new wave of technological development but also intensifying synergy regarding digital policies in order to drive the fourth industrial revolution, developing effective solutions for shared problems while transforming the economic, social and legal landscape.
The growth, direction and societal impacts of the next generation Internet will be much faster in the BRICS areas, where the majority of next generation Internet users will concentrate. As stressed by the Cisco Visual Networking Index: Global Mobile Data Traffic Forecast Update 2016–2021, smartphone use, which will account for 48% of all Internet traffic by 2021, is increasingly driven by BRICS users. This observation tellingly exemplifies that future technology and ‘game changers’ are likely to be in large part be shaped by BRICS users, while future Internet policies are likely to be driven by such innovations, with effects worldwide.
Considering the existing technological and regulatory environments and the current policy trends, the panellists will identify what are the emerging issues, policy priorities and policy-discussion fora that are likely to shape or are already shaping the governance of the next generation Internet. Moreover, the panellist will analyse how cooperation in digital policy might be enhanced amongst BRICS.

Relevance of the Session:
BRICS are intensifying efforts to become key players for the development of the future Internet and innovation and policy put forward by BRICS countries is likely to have repercussions on a global scale. The identification of emerging policy priorities, cooperation mechanisms and technology game changers emerging from the BRICS area seem therefore essential to have a clear understanding of the trends that will shape and are already shaping the Internet governance ecosystem. 

Tag 1: BRICS
Tag 2: Emerging Issues
Tag 3: Enhanced cooperation

Interventions:
Alison Gillwald will share the results of Research ICT Africa’ survey on user perceptions of ‘trust’ issues, cybersecurity, censorship, surveillance and privacy awareness in South Africa and will identify policy priorities

Benedicto Fonseca Filho will analyse the international policy and cooperation strategy of the Brazilian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, with a focus on both intergovernmental and multistakeholder initiatives involving the BRICS, such as the STEP partnership

Elonnai Hickok will analyse the causes that led to the current thriving startup ecosystem in India, while focusing on the challenges that Indian internet users are facing and putting forward suggestion to cope with such challenges

Luca Belli will present the upcoming CyberBRICS project, aimed at the establishment of a policy and research network dedicated to digital policy, Internet governace and technological evolutions in the BRICS area.

Luigi Gambardella, President of ChinaEU a business-led International Association, will analyse the intensifying business cooperation and mutual investments in Internet, Telecom and Hi-tech between China and Europe. 

 

Rashid Ismailov, Deputy Minister, Ministry of Telecommunications of Russia, will provide an overview of the cyberpolicy priorities of Russia

Tatiana Indina, will analyse the current challenges and opportunities for startups in Russia, with particular regard to data localisation

 

Diversity:
The panel is gender-balanced and includes speakers from all geographical zones and all stakeholder groups

Onsite Moderator: Luca Belli
Online Moderator: Luã Fergus
Rapporteur: Ilona Stadnik 

Online Participation:
The remote moderator will encourage remote participation through various social networking platforms in addition to the platform provided by the IGFSecretariat

Discussion facilitation:
The first part of the workshop (around 50 minutes) will be dedicated to an interactive roundtable during which the panellists will be asked to provide concise answers (i.e. less than 3-minute-long) to the questions asked by the moderator. Furthermore, panellists will have the possibility to reply to their peers' statements.

Subsequently, the panellists will engage in an open and interactive debate, during which the audience will play a key role asking questions, providing inputs and steering the discussion.

The attendees and the remote participants will be allowed to ask questions during the workshop, but their participation and inputs will be particularly encouraged during the second part of the session.

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: Yes
Link to Report: http://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/index.php?q=filedepot_download/4098/263

Agenda: 

The first part of the workshop (around 50 minutes) will be dedicated to an interactive roundtable during which the panellists will be asked to provide concise answers (i.e. less than 3-minute-long) to the questions asked by the moderator. Furthermore, panellists will have the possibility to reply to their peers' statements.

Subsequently, the panellists will engage in an open and interactive debate, during which the audience will play a key role asking questions, providing inputs and steering the discussion.

The attendees and the remote participants will be allowed to ask questions during the workshop, but their participation and inputs will be particularly encouraged during the second part of the session.

Fang Xingdong, CEOof China Labs


Session Organizers
avatar for Luca Belli

Luca Belli

Head of Internet Governance, Center for Technology and Society at FGV
Luca Belli, PhD is Senior Researcher at the Center for Technology and Society (CTS) of Fundação Getulio Vargas (FGV), where he heads the Internet Governance project. Luca is also associated researcher at Centre de Droit Public Comparé of Paris 2 University. For those who do not... Read More →


Tuesday December 19, 2017 11:50 - 13:20
Room XXVII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

11:50

Out of my Hands? (WS107)

 

'Out of my hands?: Harnessing exponential tech and user centered action to counteract sextortion'

 

Proposer: Marjolijn Bonthuis
 E-mail: marjolijn.bonthuis@ecp.nl
Stakeholder Group: Intergovernmental Organization
 Organization: NLIGF
 Country: Netherlands

Co-proposer: Catherine Garcia van Hoogstraten

Email: C.vanHoogstraten@hhs.nl

Stakeholder Group: Technical Community
 Organization: The Hague University of Applied Sciences, South School of Internet Governance

Country: The Netherlands

Co-organizers:
Arda, Gerkens, Civil Society, Director of the expertise bureau Online Child Abuse & INHOPE, Dutch Senator
Catherine Garcia van Hoogstraten, The Hague University of Applied Sciences, South School of   Internet Governance

 

Session Format: Birds of a feather- 90 Min

Format description: The goal of this Birds of a feather session is to create an open forum and multistakeholder dialogue in which the attendees generate the majority of the discussion and knowledge sharing. The session will be organized as a facilitated and highly interactive dialogue through which each participant will have the opportunity to express their position.

After introducing the case in point with a video (max. 3 minutes), the moderator will ask the speakers a round of 3 key critical questions posed in the introduction to the session that will reflect the main goals of this session explained below.  The speakers will have 5 minutes each for reacting to the 3 critical questions(total of 35 minutes). We will use green cards to let all onsite and online participants signal their convergence and red to signal their divergence with the 3 critical questions(40 minutes). We will ask during the discussions to justify their view points of convergence or divergence in relation to the questions. We have used this format already in prior internet governance national forums and turned out to be very interactive.

 

Content of the session:

The internet is shaping our life in many ways, some of it being a bliss, some being terrible. Sex is an important part of the internet, but so far the use of internet as a part of sexual exploration has had its downside. Society likes to blame the one who made the pictures, saying that by not having them, you will not be at risk. But the real problem is the anonymous spreading on the internet. Letting these images go public is a nightmare to many people. What if you could decide if, how and where an image is spread? What can you do to be in control of your own images made?

This birds of a feather session will address the current theme of sextortion and the tech responsiveness of websites and applications to help victims in sextortion incidents need of minimizing and controlling the impact and scale of this form of online harassment based on non-consensual distribution of sexual images. It will advance our understanding of the attempts in the ecosystem technical response to tackle with sextortion

It will mainly survey emerging exponential technology and user centered action being deployed by multistakeholders to counteract sextortion. Furthermore, this session will bring together different stakeholders to facilitate a joint discussion with online and onsite participants on the challenges and opportunities brought by this emerging exponential technology to tackle sextortion.

 

The session has four main GOALS:

1. Explore key emerging exponential technology and user centered action being deployed by multistakeholders to counteract sextortion

2. Identify its challenges and opportunities and its implications for Internet Governance

 

The expected OUTCOMES include the following:

1. Nuanced understanding of current emerging exponential technology and user centered action being deployed by multistakeholders to counteract sextortion and its implications for Internet Governance

2. Multistakeholder dialogue and commitment to contribute to draft policy recommendations to help victims in sextortion incidents

 

 

Relevance of the Session:

To be in control of your digital images, being able to stop spreading of leaked images or being made under sextortion, should be a possibility with the technologies out there. That would truly be shaping your future on the internet.  These new tech tools will be using image matching technology combined with AI to stop a photo from being shared before it even gets a chance to make it live on the platform and will also work across other platforms like Facebook, Messenger or Instagram.

 

Tags:

Tag 1: Cybersecurity

Tag 2: Child Safety

Tag 3: Multistakeholder action

Tag 4: New Technology and emerging issues

Tag 5: Ethical dimensions of technology mediation

 

Discussion facilitation:
Organizers will develop a list of thought-provoking questions to spur conversation. In addition, we will closely work with the remote moderator to ensure online participants are afforded equal opportunity to participate.

As a birds of a feather session, we hope for a lively, perhaps confrontational discussion as our speakers engage as peers with the other participants around the table. The onsite moderator will sharpen contrasts between points of view, request examples from everyone in the room, and note points of covergence and divergence with respect to the 3 critical questions. The goal of this session is not necessarily to reach consensus on the nature of the problem or potential mitigations, but rather to elucidate a variety of frank points of view, and perceptions of what key internet stakeholders ought to be doing in response. This is not a panel, and as such all speakers will be looking to engage substantively with the others in the room.

Online Participation:

The livestream for this event will be promoted in advance through the social networks of the organizer, as well as by discussants. Responses to the session’s key discussion topics will be solicited in advance from community members who will not be able to participate in the live discussion, such as those located in time zones not conducive to viewing the livestream. Questions and comments received will be shared with the Onsite Moderator for incorporation into the live discussion. During the live session, the Online Moderator will coordinate with remote participants to facilitate live audio participation in the discussion if technical media permit. In addition, non-audio based comments and questions received through social media or chat discussions in the virtual meeting space will be integrated into the discussion directly by the Online Moderator.

 

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: Yes
Link to Report: http://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/index.php?q=filedepot_download/4098/301Dui

Discussants: 

* Arda Gerkens, Director of Expertisebureau Online Child Abuse, Dutch Senator, President of INHOPE

* Neil Walsh, United Nations Cybercrime Chief, UNODC

 * Catherine Garcia van Hoogstraten, Technology, Internet Policy and Cybersecurity Consultant, Liaison and Associate Professor at the Faculty of Public Management, Law and Security -The Hague University of Applied Sciences, Vising Faculty at the South School of Internet Governance

* Karuna Nain, Facebook's Global Safety Programs Manager

* Semanur Karaman, Coordinator Political Participation, Gender and Tech at Tactical Tech Collective

*Walid Al Sagaf, Vice Chair at ISOC Blockchain Special Interest Group

* Renata Aquino, Researcher in Education, Communication and Technology, member of ISOC Blockchain

* Su Sonia Hearing, Mentor at Middle East & Adjoining Countries School of Internet Governance, Organizing Committee Member Youth IGF Turkey

* Gregory Mounier, Head of Outreach and Support at EUROPOL

* Claudio Lucena, Visiting Researcher at Georgetown University

* Olga Cavalli, Director of the South School of Internet Governance, ICANN GAC Advisor on the Special Group of Technology Affairs

 

Onsite Moderator: Catherine Garcia van Hoogstraten

Online Moderator: Vanessa Berning and Renata Aquino

Rapporteur: Wilma Westenberg

Agenda: 

Proposed Agenda:

Welcome and Overview - 2 minutes Moderator

Overview of the problematic through a video – 3 minutes

Speakers reacting to the 3 critical questions - 35 minutes

Open discussion among audience participants facilitated by Moderator and speaker acting  as discussion Facilitators- 40 minutes

Summarize outcomes  – 10 minutes

 

...

Session Organizers
avatar for Catherine Garcia van Hoogstraten

Catherine Garcia van Hoogstraten

Technology, Internet Policy, Cybersecurity Associate Professor - Civic Tech and Innovation Consultant & Liaison, The Hague University of Applied Sciences
Technology, Internet Policy, Legal Innovation, Cybersecurity Associate Professor at the Faculty of Public Management, Law and Security, The Hague University of Applied Sciences. Civic Tech and Innovation Independent Consultant & Liaison. Visiting faculty at Webster University Cybersecurity... Read More →



Tuesday December 19, 2017 11:50 - 13:20
Room XXV - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

12:00

NRIs Collaborative Session: Multilingual Internet: IDNs under the magnifying glass

Co-proposers/co-organizers

  1. Macedonia IGF (FYRO) 
  2. Nepal IGF
  3. Russian IGF
  4. SEEDIG 
Session title
Multilingual Internet: IDNs under the magnifying glass

Session format and timing
This session will be 90 minutes long, and will be organized as a round-table, allowing all in situ and online participants to contribute to the discussions.

Content of the session
This session has a twofold objective: to raise more awareness on Internationalised Domain Names (IDNs) and their relevance in the quest for a more inclusive Internet; and to explore challenges (and possible solutions) related to the implementation and use of IDNs.

In this context, the session will be structured in three parts:

Segment 1: Multilingualism and IDNs: What and why? The session will start with a short intro into the issue of multilingualism on the Internet, and will continue with a brief introduction to IDNs.
Segment 2: IDNs through the eyes of end-users. This segment will be focused on end-users, and their perceptions of, experiences with, and expectations from IDNs.
Segment 3: IDNs behind the scenes. The technical community (registries, registrars, ICANN, the Universal Acceptance Steering Group, etc) and the private sector (search engines, e-mail service providers, etc.) will be invited to talk about what they do in the area of IDNs, and how they (can)respond to end-users’ needs and concerns related to IDN usability. This segment will include experience sharing (from existing IDN registries, Internet companies, etc), discussions on challenges faced in implementing IDNs, overviews of the work done to address such challenges, etc. Other stakeholders involved in the promotion of IDNs will be included in this segment as well (e.g. governments, IGOs, etc.).

Depending on the level of interaction in the room, segments 2 and 3 could be combined into a Q&A-type discussion, where there will be a dialogue among end-users, registries, registrars, Internet companies, other technical organisations, etc.

The session will rely on a strong moderation (2 moderators) and several resource persons whose role will be to help set the scene for discussions, by sharing national and regional perspectives.  A set of questions will also be developed, to help engage participants in the discussion.

The rapporteur(s) will present key messages from the session in the last  minutes of the session.

The session aims for fully interactive discussion with all present participants.

Speakers/Resource persons
Segment 1: 
Jonne Soininen, ICANN Board 
Segment 2: 
Lianna Galstyan, Internet Society Armenia
Segment 3:  
Irina Danelia, Coordination Center for TLDs .RU/.РФ
Sanja Simonova, MARnet
Alena Belskaya, Hoster.by for TLDs .BY/.БЕЛ
Edmon Chung, Universal Acceptance Steering Group
Jennifer Chung, DotAsia Registry

Relevance of the issue
IDNs were launched with the aim to make the Internet more inclusive, by giving users the possibility to access and register domain names in their own languages and scripts. IDNs overall objective is to empower more people to use the Internet. They are especially relevant to the regions using the non-Latin script. Many countries in the Eastern European region, but also in Asia Pacific have direct experiences on this, given the diversity of scripts (i.e. Armenian, Cyrillic, Georgian, Greek, Latin. In some countries, IDN country code top-level domains (ccTLDs) have been implemented (Armenia, Belarus, Bulgaria, Macedonia FYR (.МКД), Russia (.РФ), Serbia, etc.) or are in the process of being implemented (Greece), while other countries have announced their intention to implement IDNs in the future (such as Bosnia and Herzegovina). In addition, the New gTLD Program launched by ICANN in 2012 opened the door for IDN generic top-level domain (gTLDs), such as .сайт “.website”, .онлайн “.online”, etc.. But there is a need to raise more awareness and promote a better understanding of IDN-related challenges, in order to ensure that the initial objective of IDNs is achieved. 

Interventions/Engagement with participants (onsite and online)
Several guiding questions will help frame the discussions. Examples below.
Segment 1: 
What are IDNs? Why and how did this idea came to life?
Segment 2: 
A live quiz (using an online tool such as Mentimeter) will be prepared for session participants to answer on the spot. It will include questions related to the actual use of IDNs (whether session participants use IDNs and why, whether they find value in IDNs, what advantages and disadvantages they see in IDNs, challenges related to the use of IDNs, recommendations for improving IDNs, etc.). The survey conducted by SEEDIG in early 2017 could serve as a source of inspiration in developing this quiz.
Segment 3:
For registries: For registries: Why embarking on a journey to introduce IDNs? What was/is your main motivation? | Share one challenge you have faced during this journey and what you have done or are doing to address it. | Are you satisfied with what you have achieved after launching the IDN? | What challenges do you still face regarding the usability of your IDN? Regarding the /РФ domain experience I should say that the main challenge we are facing is some technical restrictions with IDN e-mail, or restrictions in using these domains in some registration forms and so on. We strongly believe that if vendors could solve such kind of problems there will be another giant leap in number of registrations and usage.
For registrars: Why including IDNs in your offering? | What is the demand for IDN domain names, among your client base? | What are the main complains you get from your clients when it comes to IDNs? | What is, in your view, the main aspects that needs to be addressed/improved, to have IDNs more widely used.
For Internet companies: What is your perspective on the usability of IDNs?
For ICANN/Universal Acceptance Steering Group: What is ‘universal acceptance’ and how do we get there? 
For Governments/IGOs: Why are IDNs among your concerns? 

Geographical, Stakeholder and Gender Diversity
The session will not have speakers as such, but the co-organisers will make sure that the session respects diversity criteria, both among the resource persons, and throughout the overall session discussions.

Onsite moderator(s)
Andrea Beccalli, ICANN
Mikhail Anisimov, Coordination Center for TLDs .RU/.РФ
 
Online moderator(s)
Aleksandar Icokaev

Rapporteur(s)
Sorina Teleanu

Online participation logistics
Webex and Twitter will be used to gather input from online participants.

Discussion facilitation
The session will rely on strong moderation, with two moderators facilitating discussions among all session participants.



Session Organizers
avatar for Lianna Galstyan

Lianna Galstyan

ISOC Armenia, External Relations Manager, Armenia IGF


Tuesday December 19, 2017 12:00 - 13:30
Room XXII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

12:10

Financing and building sustainable community networks - the Coolab experience (WS111)

Proposer's Name: Mr. bruno vianna
Proposer's Organization: coolab
Co-Proposer's Name: Mr. marcelo saldanha
Co-Proposer's Organization: Instituto Bem Estar Brasil
Co-Organizers:
Mr. Adriano BELISARIO, Civil Society, Coolab
Mr. Rafael ZANATTA, Civil Society, IDEC


Session Format: Flash Session - 30 Min

Proposer:
Country: Brazil
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Co-Proposer:
Country: Brazil
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speaker: Adriano Belisario
Speaker: Rafael Zanatta
Speaker: Marcelo Saldanha
Speaker: bruno caldas vianna
Speaker: Paulo Duarte Paulo Roberto Duarte de Souza Júnior

Content of the Session:
In this session we will make a short presentation of the Coolab experience and some partnerships with other NGOs that works with community providers. Coolab is a collective dedicated to the creation of free networks in Brazil. We provide loans and support for the communities to create their own infrastructure. When these loans are returned we can invest in new communities. This way we believe we can create a sustainable practice for bridging the digital divide.

Coolab's methodology itself provides empowerment of the community by ensuring that the design and installation is made by neighbors after a week of immersion and training.

In March 2017, Coolab was selected as most novel project in Mozilla’s Equal Rating challenge, which allowed us to start operations with a 30.000 USD endowment.

Relevance of the Session:
We see community networks as a most valuable tool to regain control of the Internet infrastructure, as well as the most democratic method for closing the digital divide. By taking control of the communications infrastructure, communities not only are able to decide on local connectivity governance, but they enables neighbors in different technical fields. Local networks foster the local economy more than the ones created by government or corporations, by creating local jobs and driving maintenance costs; they’re more efficient and resilient. Being able to design, build and manage their own infrastructure is a great incentive to the overall empowerment of the community and vital for shaping the future of the Internet as an open, accessible and democratic arena.



Tag 1: Digital Divide
Tag 2: Community Networks
Tag 3: Capacity Building

Interventions:
Marcelo Saldanha and Adriano Belisário will put the debate about legal issues in the case of brazilian regulations and how those regulations talk about community connectivity and democratization of the telecom
Laura Tresca will talk about the capacity building and the methodology used by coolab to create and make ignitions in the communities, including some examples of community networks created and their infrastructures
Rafael Zanatta will talk about the part of the methodology and the model created by coolab through a cooperative process
Paulo Duarte will talk about initiatives that Nupef and coolab creates together

Diversity:
We'll propose a gender balanced panel with different stakeholders.

Onsite Moderator: Bruno Vianna
Online Moderator: Bruno Freitas
Rapporteur: Adriano Belisário

Online Participation:
We want to offer an online experience as close to the onsite one as possible. The online moderator is very familiar with the issues debated and he will have time to prepare himself further in the months before the event. He will take questions and comments from the online audience and propose them at the most appropriate moments.

Discussion facilitation:
As the time is very limited, we will have the speakers talk very briefly, in a concise form. There will be no physical separation between speakers and audience; we will dispose chairs in a circle mixing all participants. This will, we believe the audience is more encouraged to engage.

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: No
Link to Report: 

Additional Speakers: 

Nils Brock, journalist and researcher (Phd at the Free University of Berlin) in the field of communication politics and media development. Freelance writer and correspondent in Latin America for 12 years (eg. Jungle World, welt-sichten, Nachrichtenpool Lateinamerika, NPLA). Co-founder of Flujos.org media collective in Mexico in 2007. Since then, he has had several experiences as media trainer and producer. International aidworker for AMARC Brasil (2012-2017). Since September 2017 project coordinator and media developer for NPLA in Berlin, Germany.

Agenda: 

1. Introduction – 10 minutes

2. Presentation of Coolab proposal and results so far – 30 minutes

3. Open for participants’ questions – 20 minutes

4. Sharing of participants experiences on sustainable networks – 30 minutes

5. Debate on community-based ustainable networks – 45 minutes

6. Next steps and conclusions - 15 minutes

 


Session Organizers

Tuesday December 19, 2017 12:10 - 12:40
Room XXVI - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

12:20

OECD Project Going Digital: Making the Transformation Work for Growth and Well-being (OF24)
On 12 January 2017, the OECD officially launched the Going Digital project. The project aims to help policymakers better understand the digital transformation that is taking place and develop tools to create a policy environment that enables their economies and societies to prosper in a world that is increasingly digital and data-driven. To achieve these objectives, the project leverages the unique capacity of the OECD to bring together a wide range of policy communities and stakeholders to collectively identify the opportunities and address the challenges our economies and societies face in a digital world. 

This project is relevant to the 2017 IGF “Shape your Digital Future!” conference because it will articulate recommendations for forward-looking, pro-active policies that will help to drive greater growth and societal well-being and help address the challenges of slow productivity growth, high unemployment and growing inequality in many countries. In particular, one component of the project involves using foresight to develop a set of set of plausible alternative future scenarios to explore possible opportunities and challenges that could emerge as the digital transformation progresses. The OECD will then work to develop possible policy responses to be prepared for these potential future scenarios

The objective of the proposed Open Forum workshop is to inform stakeholders about the project and solicit feedback on the overall scope and activities, with a particular focus on the Going Digital foresight scenarios that will be developed specifically for the project. In particular, we see the IGF as a unique forum to test some of the technology aspects of the scenarios to ensure that they are both plausible and incorporate cutting-edge knowledge about technological developments.

Agenda (1 hour)

The panel includes 4 women and 2 men and 4 stakeholder groups (business, government, civil society, and the Internet technical community), all confirmed:

I. Overview of the OECD project: Going Digital: Making the Transformation Work for Growth and Well-being (5 minutes, Molly Lesher, OECD)

II. Special focus on the OECD Going Digital Foresight Scenarios (11 minutes, Duncan Cass-Beggs, OECD)

III. Stakeholder reactions to the Going Digital project and the Foresight Scenarios, answering two questions (24 minutes)

- What are the three most important outputs that the Going Digital project should deliver? 
- Are the foresight scenarios plausible? Are there important “weak signals” or potential technological developments that we’ve missed? 

Carolyn Nguyen, Microsoft (6 minutes)
Johannes Rühl, Switzerland (6 minutes)
Olga Cavalli, ISOC (6 minutes) 
Suso Baleato, Civil Society Information Society Advisory Council (6 minutes)

IV. Open discussion among participants on site and online (18 minutes)

V. Closing remarks (Molly Lesher, OECD, 2 minutes).


Tag 1: Digital Transformation
Tag 2: Leaving No One Behind in the Digital Future
Tag 3: Digital Future

Speaker(s):

Mr. Duncan Cass-Beggs is currently OECD Counsellor for Strategic Foresight. His work aims to enhance strategic foresight and new approaches within the OECD and bring a stronger future focus to global dialogue on key policy issues. He works with OECD staff, governments and leading foresight practitioners worldwide to explore disruptive changes that could occur in the future – and their implications for policy decisions today. This work will aim to challenge prevailing assumptions and stimulate ongoing dialogue on the most adaptive policies for a rapidly evolving and uncertain world.

Ms. Molly Lesher is the Co-ordinator of the OECD Going Digital project, which brings a whole-of-OECD perspective to understanding the digital transformation and developing pro-active policies to make it work for growth and well-being. More broadly, her work is aimed at supporting OECD member and partner governments with digital economy policy advice and analysis. 

Dr. M-H. Carolyn Nguyen is a Director of Technology Policy at Microsoft, focused on policy issues related to internet governance, the digital economy, and artificial intelligence. Her work is aimed at influencing global policy-making by engaging with stakeholders and raising awareness of the role of technology in economic development, through participation in public policy dialogues and venues, including the United Nations (UN), Internet Governance Forum (IGF), Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), and World Economic Forum. 

Ms. Olga Cavalli is an Internet leader whose work has been fundamental for advancing a wide range of Internet-related fields in Latina America. Olga currently teaches at the University of Buenos Aires, is the President of the ISOC Argentina Chapter and she is also involved in the development of wireless connectivity projects in rural areas of the center and north of Argentina. Olga works towards the inclusion of girls and women in ICTs and the Internet, organizing activities jointly with ISOC, ISOC Argentina Chapter, ITU, UNESCO, ICANN, the Argentina National Center of Engineers and the University of Buenos Aires. 

Dr. Suso Baleato is specialised in the application of computational methods to support scientific inquiry and policy analysis. His research focuses on Internet measurement and the causality of digitalisation, and it has been published in academic outlets such as Science. Dr. Baleato contributes to the global digitalisation policy-making process in the context of the OECD and G7/ G20 dialogue, with an emphasis on privacy and data protection, artificial intelligence and cybersecurity. He has been appointed Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University Institute for Quantitative Social Science (IQSS), Martin Associate at the Oxford Cybersecurity Capacity Center, and Liaison of the Civil Society Council for the OECD Committee on the Digital Economy Policy. 

Mr. Johannes Rühl is currently serving as Councilor at the Permanent Delegation of Switzerland to the OECD in Paris, where he works on matters related to digital policy, trade, competition and investment. He previously worked for the Swiss State Secretariat for Economic Affairs (SECO) dealing with various international trade negotiations. He holds an MSc from the London School of Economics and Political Science and a PhD from the Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies in Geneva.

Name of Online Moderator: Lorrayne Porciuncula (OECD)

Background Paper: going-digital-information-note.pdf

Past IGF Participation: Yes
Report Link: http://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/index.php?q=filedepot_download/4115/313
Name: Ms. Lorrayne Porciuncula
Organizational Affiliation: OECD
 

Session Organizers
avatar for Lorrayne Porciuncula

Lorrayne Porciuncula

Internet Economist / Policy Analyst, OECD
Lorrayne Porciuncula is an Economist/ Policy Analyst at the Digital Economy and Policy Division (CDEP) of the Directorate Science, Technology and Innovation in the OECD. Lorrayne works on the OECD-IDB Broadband Policy Toolkit for Latin America and the Caribbean that aims to situate... Read More →



Tuesday December 19, 2017 12:20 - 13:20
Room XI - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

12:20

Local Content in the Media (OF81)
Digital technologies and widespread connectivity has transformed the old ways of content production and distribution across all creative industries, with consequences to all levels of the sector, from business models to the audiences news consumption habits.

The enhancement of legal offer and the empowerment of users have shown that despite general trend towards globalization of content, the appetite and need for local content is still high and is set to remain. 

Cultural diversity is not only a value to be safeguarded but it is a market driver in itself. In this scenario, Media companies play the most crucial role in preserving and boosting the availability of local content worldwide. 

The WIPO-EBU Open Forum will look at how a balanced and effective copyright system and media regulation represents a powerful tool to implement any policy goal in this field.
Tag 1: Local Content
Tag 2: Media
Tag 3: Copyright
Name(s) of Speaker(s):
WIPO, Paolo Lanteri
EBU, Giacomo Mazzone & Heijo Ruijsenaars
FIAPF, Bobby Bedi (Film Director, India) & Bertrand Moullier
WAN-IFRA, Daniel Bergamasco (Digital Editor at Veja, Brazil) & Elena Perotti

Name of Online Moderator: WIPO, Victor Owade
Background Paper:
Past IGF Participation: Yes
Report Link: http://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/index.php?q=filedepot_download/4115/377
Name: Mr. Paolo Lanteri
Organizational Affiliation: WIPO/EBU
 

Session Organizers
avatar for Paolo Lanteri

Paolo Lanteri

Legal Officer, World Intellectual Property Organization
Mr. Lanteri is a lawyer, specialized in IP law, and a member of both the Spanish and the Italian Bar Association. He works in the Copyright Law Division of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO); he is part of the restricted team of lawyers dealing with all the copyright... Read More →


Tuesday December 19, 2017 12:20 - 13:20
Room XXI - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

12:30

DC on Public Access in Libraries

TITLE:  Policy Changes for Public Access

DESCRIPTION:

This Session of the Dynamic Coalition on Public Access (DC-PAL) has two objectives: the first is to share real-world examples of the important role libraries perform by providing public access to the Internet. Four speakers will bring experience from Africa, Latin America and the Pacific.

The second objective is more ambitious. Building on the Principles on Public Access agreed in 2015, DC-PAL wants to launch a deeper analysis of the tangible policy changes needed to make a reality of public access in libraries.

What are the barriers, and what are the enablers of high impact projects?

What can we learn from different regional experiences? What made them successful or not? Which technology or regulatory framework the respective governments employed?  What policy prescriptions the DC-PAL should prioritize and why?

The DC-PAL session at IGF 2017 will serve as a springboard to start gathering information from all stakeholders.

NAMES OF SPEAKERS:

  • Maria Garrido – Technology and Social Change Group, University of Washington

Maria Garrido will discuss the Developing Access for Information Report (DA2I) that recognizes that access to information is crucial for sustainable development, and offers affirmation of the work that libraries do in guaranteeing public access to the Internet. (20 minutes).

 

  • Janet Sawaya – EIFL Public Library Innovation Programme and advisor for Initiatives for Africa works on capacity building initiative for public librarians in Africa, and developing new partnerships. Before joining EIFL, Janet worked for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation as programme officer in the Global Libraries Programme, and as Deputy Director for Nutrition and Maternal Newborn and Child Health.

 

  • Winston Roberts – IFLA/National Library of New Zealand. Winston has contributed to government digital strategy development, promoted projects in support of public libraries, literacy and book development, liaised with UNESCO, and represented New Zealand at the World Summit on the Information Society in 2003 and 2005. He was the Secretary of the Conference of Directors of National Libraries (2006 to 2010). He continues to be active in the Regional Section of IFLA for Asia-Oceania and in various other IFLA groups.

 

  • David Ramirez-Ordonez (remotely). David is librarian, blogger and teacher. He has focused his work on copyright, freedom of expression and freedom of access to information and how the Internet affects our lives. He has participated in regional meetings for exceptions and limitations to copyright for libraries. He is a professional in information science – librarian and has an MA in education. He creates the Colombian Public Domain Calculator, helps to develop the Colombian legal deposit and works in digital libraries. More at www.nomono.co/david

 

Moderator: Esmeralda Moscatelli, Policy and Research Officer, IFLA

ORGANIZER(S) NAME(S): Esmeralda Moscatelli, Janet Sawaya, Stephen Wyber
ORGANIZATION

Session Organizers
avatar for Esmeralda Moscatelli

Esmeralda Moscatelli

Policy Officer, IFLA
Libraries and Public Access


Tuesday December 19, 2017 12:30 - 13:30
Room XXIII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

12:40

12:50

How Counter Narratives can help Pluralistic Democracy to florish online (WS109)

Proposer's Name: Mr. Menno Ettema
Proposer's Organization: Council of Europe - No Hate Speech Movement
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Ruxa Pandea
Co-Proposer's Organization: Youth Department - Council of Europe
Co-Organizers:
Mr. Menno, ETTEMA, Intergovernmental Organisation, Council of Europe Ms. Irina Drexler, Civil Society, PATRIR

Session Format: Flash Session - 30 Min

Proposer:
Country: France
Stakeholder Group: Intergovernmental Organizations

Co-Proposer:
Country: Hungary
Stakeholder Group: Intergovernmental Organizations

Speaker: Ron Salej
Speaker: Ingrid Aspelund

Content of the Session:
Background:
The No Hate Speech Movement aims to mobilise young people to take action for Human Rights online. The how can vary but basically follows the same lines of action adopted by Human Rights actions undertaken in offline settings.
A new manual We CAN! Taking action on hate Speech through Counter and Alternative narratives with young people through Human Rights Education is launched March 2017. It, combined with the manual Bookmarks of the No Hate Speech Movement, educates youth to recognise and respond to hate speech constructively.
Working on Narratives has been the entree point for education for remembrance, democracy and human rights adopted at the Remembrance centre on Utoya Island, Norway. The centre was erected on the site Attack in 2013 in which 69 Norwegian youth lost their lives.

Content:
5 min: Introduction
There are many different forms of action that can be taken on Hate Speech. The ‘Model for taking action for Human Rights’ of the manual Compass (www.coe.int/compass), identifies: Legal action; direct action; Research and Information gathering; Lobby & Advocacy; Education; Awareness-raising; campaigning; counselling (incl. victim support). These forms of actions can be illustrated by one sentence examples from the No Hate Speech Movement in Ireland.

Presently the debate on taking action on hate speech seems to limit itself to two fronts:
1. Reporting and take down (legal action, often outsources, through the reporting tools of the Internet companies)
2. Use of Counter (and Alternative) Narratives

15 Minutes: Exploration: what are Counter and Alternative narratives taken examples from Utoya training centre and the No Hate Speech Movement
Using 2 illustrative video’s in buzz groups of 2 to 3 people the group will review the questions:
- What is a Counter Narrative?
- What is an Alternative Narrative?
- What makes a Counter or Alternative narrative a Human Rights Narrative?

10 Minutes: closing discussion
Participants can share from their practice and realities examples of using Counter and Alternative Narratives. The discussion can be structures around a few of these questions (tbc):
- Why and when should Counter and Alternative Narratives be used to take action on hate speech, is it preferred above reporting, if so why?
- How can counter and alternative narratives become a tool towards building a democratic internet space; what minimum criteria need to be provided and who should secure them?
- Who is responsible to develop; strengthen; promote: Counter & Alternative Narratives?
(civil society; national authorities; Journalist & media; Internet Businesses, specifically social media platforms; educators; individual users?)
- How can we ensure that Counter and Alternative narratives function within a human rights framework?
- How can we monitor and measure impact from the use of counter and alternative narratives.

Relevance of the Session:
The use of Counter Narratives as response to violent radicalisation is becoming a growing practice, in addition to reporting and take-down of ‘illegal’ hate speech. The role of the various stakeholders (National authorities, Internet business, Youth workers, Educators and broader civil society) in this process however remains unclear with most initiatives taken up by the civil society sector.

Counter and Alternative narratives can and should however play an important role in the shaping of our digital future. They can strengthen pluralistic and participatory democratic processes online if successfully based on a human rights framework. Their success (strength of the message; outreach and impact) depends on the commitment and support the work on narratives receives.

Civil Society and online activists in particular are developing their expertise and related educational processes. The role and involvement of Internet businesses and the regulatory role of governments needs to be reviewed.

Tag 1: Hate Speech
Tag 2: Human Rights Online
Tag 3: Counter and Alternative Narratives

Interventions:
Ron Salaj, Online activist and co-author of the We CAN! manual, will be able to explore with participants the structure and function of Counter and Alternative narratives.

Ingrid Aspelund, Programme coordinator at the European Wergeland Centre. She will illustrate how the educational programme at Utoya, on the site of the Hate attack killing 69 Young people at a summer camp, aims to strengthen support for freedom of expression and democratic participation using Counter and Alternative narratives.

Diversity:
All speakers, organisers and moderators and first time participants in IGF.
The profile of speakers reflects gender diversity, thematic expertise and different regions of the European continent

Onsite Moderator: Menno Ettema
Online Moderator: Anca Sendescu / Ruxa Pandea
Rapporteur: Irina Drexler

Online Participation:
The session will be announced through the social media channels of the No Hate Speech Movement (outreach Europe, Morocco, Mexico, Canada, and parts of India, Tunisia, USA.)

During the Session online participants can follow the short introduction and raise questions through the online moderator.
The discussion questions can be taken up by online participants in the IGF chat room linked to the session.
National Campaigns of the No Hate Speech Movement, and partner organisations in other parts of the world are invited to host a discussion session in their local community (before or during the IGF session) and feed in their findings. Potentially the No Hate Speech Movement online Community manager could host a Google Hangout session(s) with the remote community gatherings.

Discussion facilitation:
The session consist of three phases
1. Plenary introduction, this intends to give a quick baseline for all participants to start from.
2. Buzz groups with plenary feedback to explore Counter and Alternative Narratives. This method allows for involvement of the participants, group learning and joined exploration of the potential and challenges of using counter and alternative narratives. It helps break the ice, yet is still guided. Online participants can easily feed in their thoughts through the discussion board with the online moderator needs to summarise and vocalise to the participants in the session.
3. Discussion groups on challenges and way forward with working on Counter and alternative narratives. This method allows for more freedom for the discussion to go different directions and inputs from participant’s practices. 

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: No
Link to Report: 

Agenda: 

0-5’: Introduction, short presentation of forms of taking action on hate speech and for human rights that exists in a democratic society.

5-20’: Exploration: what make Counter and Alternative narratives a human rights narrative supporting pluralistic democracy?, with illustrations from the No Hate Speech Movement and other campaigns and youth actions.

20-30’: closing discussion, sharing of practices and examples by participants

 


Session Organizers
avatar for Menno Ettema

Menno Ettema

No Hate Speech Movement European coordinator, Council of Europe


Tuesday December 19, 2017 12:50 - 13:20
Room XXVI - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

13:00

Jurisdiction on the Internet: Understanding global trends
Presenters: Carlos Affonso Souza, Paul Fehlinger

Tuesday December 19, 2017 13:00 - 13:20
IGF Village Area

13:15

IGF Newcomers and Youth Track: The role of Governments and IGOs at the IGF and ways for engagement

IGF is based on a multistakeholder model. It allows all stakeholders to equally work together: Governments, Civil Society, Private Sector and Technical Community! The Newcomers&Youth Track will explain what is the role of all these stakeholders. 

During this informal gathering, that we call the Knowledge Cafe, learn what is the role of Governments and Intergovernmental Organizations within the IGF and ways for your engagement?

Come and spend time with representatives of many organizations involved in the IGF!

 

 


Tuesday December 19, 2017 13:15 - 14:00
Room IX - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

13:25

Benchmarking ICT companies on digital rights: How-to and lessons learned
In 2017, Ranking Digital Rights (RDR) launched its second Corporate Accountability Index, which evaluates 22 of the world’s largest internet, mobile, and telecommunications companies, which together serve billions of customers, on their commitments and disclosed policies affecting users’ freedom of expression and privacy.

For this session, Ranking Digital Rights will give a brief overview of the Index and how our methodology and research process can be used by other stakeholders to hold companies accountable for respecting the rights of their users. The Centre for Internet & Society will present on their research, which adapted the RDR methodology to examine privacy disclosure from internet and telecommunications in India, to share lessons learned in how to conduct a localized ranking.

We will leave time for questions and discussion, and would encourage anyone conducting or interested in launching their own research in this area to attend.

Session Organizers
avatar for Ilana Ullman

Ilana Ullman

Policy and Communications Analyst, Ranking Digital Rights


Tuesday December 19, 2017 13:25 - 13:45
IGF Village Area

13:30

IGFSA Annual General Assembly
Tuesday December 19, 2017 13:30 - 15:00
Room XXVII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

13:50

14:15

14:40

15:00

Fake News, AI Trolls & Disinformation: How Can the Internet Community Deal with Poison in the System (WS68)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Sarah Moulton
Proposer's Organization: National Democratic Institute
Co-Proposer's Name: Mr. Chris Doten
Co-Proposer's Organization: National Democratic Institute
Co-Organizers:
Mr.,Chris,DOTEN,Civil Society,National Democratic Institute
Ms.,Sarah,MOULTON,Civil Society,National Democratic Institute


Session Format: Birds of a Feather - 60 Min

Proposer:
Country: United States
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Co-Proposer:
Country: United States
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speaker: Matt Chessen
Speaker: Alina Polyakova
Speaker: Samuel Woolley
Speaker: Donatien Niyongendako

Content of the Session:
While this is designed to be a free-flowing conversation, the discussion leader will ensure that the group touches on three core points about shaping a better internet for the future: how to deal with trolling and online harassment, particularly via AI bots, without infringing on free speech; how social platforms and content algorithms can be manipulated to surface hatred or false information, and what, if anything, can be done about it; and the role of governmental policymakers in writing legal frameworks to support an open but inclusive online dialogue. Given the range of experiences of our participants, as well as the other diverse voices we expect will participate in the conversation, we expect a vibrant discussion.

Relevance of the Session:
At the same time that the internet is becoming the indispensable communications medium of a majority of citizens around the world, the online space increasingly seems to be warping into a hostile environment for civil dialogue. The openness that makes the internet the greatest communication platform in human history is being misshapen by forces who attempt to drown out speech with hatred, misinform with biased propaganda, and craft realities grounded in alternative sets of facts. Critical questions will be answered - or ignored - in the next years that will shape the role of the internet in our lives: the obligations of policymakers to reign in online hatred vs. protecting free speech; of social platforms to build content algorithms that do not reflect unconscious bias or can be easily manipulated; and the role of civil society in pushing back against the internet deluge of falsehood and fake news, sometimes pushed by nation-states. How can decisions or policies enacted by the wider internet governance community help or hinder the outcomes take by these different stakeholders?

Tag 1: Freedom of Expression Online
Tag 2: Disinformation
Tag 3: 

Interventions:
While the Birds of a Feather session will not have formal presentations, key topic leaders have been identified who will further guide conversation around key discussion questions posed to the session participants, based on their diverse expertise. Alina Polyakova of the Brookings Institution (confirmed) focuses on the uses of the internet by nation-states to manipulate public opinion, while Matt Chessen (confirmed) as a Digital Diplomacy team member from the US State Department will articulate a governmental perspective on mass communication. Oxford’s Samuel Woolley (confirmed) will share a perspective advanced research on the ways in which computational propaganda is being distributed by AI-powered bots, while Donatien Niyongendako of DefendingDefenders (confirmed) can discuss the impacts his civic organization has seen on the suppression of public communication in the Horn of Africa.

Diversity:
This Birds of a Feather session will have lead speakers representing a variety of stakeholder groups, including government, academia, civil society, and technology specialists. No suggested members have been participants in an IGF event in the past, and each of the confirmed speakers represents differing areas of subject matter expertise and geographic focus. Additional speakers to be confirmed will include representatives from the Global South, as well as those who have direct experience encountering online harassment and trolling - particularly women. We intend to use the online discussion capabilities to further diversify the types of participants in the discussion.

Onsite Moderator: Chris Doten 
Online Moderator: Sarah Moulton
Rapporteur: Amanda Domingues

Online Participation:
The livestream for this event will be promoted in advance through the social networks of the organizer, as well as by discussants. Responses to the session’s key discussion topics will be solicited in advance from community members who will not be able to participate in the live discussion, such as those located in time zones not conducive to viewing the livestream. Questions and comments received will be shared with the Onsite Moderator for incorporation into the live discussion. During the live session, the Online Moderator will coordinate with remote participants to facilitate live audio participation in the discussion if technical media permit. In addition, non-audio based comments and questions received through social media or chat discussions in the virtual meeting space will be integrated into the discussion directly by the Online Moderator. 

Discussion facilitation:
As a birds of a feather session, we hope for a lively, perhaps confrontational discussion as our speakers engage as peers with the other participants around the table. The facilitator will sharpen contrasts between points of view, request examples from everyone in the room, and note points of disagreement. The goal of this session is not necessarily to reach consensus on the nature of the problem or potential mitigations, but rather to elucidate a variety of frank points of view, and perceptions of what key internet stakeholders ought to be doing in response. This is not a panel, and as such all speakers will be looking to engage substantively with the others in the room. Specific conversational prompts may include:
What is the role of internet policy makers in responding to nation-state engagement in online conversations?
What are the economic incentives for creating disinformation flows? Should one remove troll networks?
Does fact checking work? Should communications platforms adopt it? Who checks the checkers?”
With accelerating AI behind sock-puppet bot accounts, what is the future of civic dialogue online?

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: No
Link to Report: 

Background Paper

 

Agenda: 

Introduction to the topic by Moderator (5 mins)

Introduction of Topic Leaders (10 mins)

Open Discussion with Session Participants (40 mins)

The Birds of a Feather session will be driven primarily by interests of in-person and online participants, but guiding questions would include:

  • What is the role of internet policy makers in responding to nation-state engagement in online conversations?
  • What are the economic incentives for creating disinformation flows? Should one remove troll networks?
  • Does fact checking work? Should communications platforms adopt it? Who checks the fact checkers?
  • How can we address the disproportionate impact of trolls on women’s online participation?
  • With accelerating AI behind sock-puppet accounts, what is the future of civic dialogue online?

Concluding remarks (5 mins)

 


Session Organizers

Tuesday December 19, 2017 15:00 - 16:00
Room XXV - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

15:00

Digital Transformation of the Lebanese Telecom Sector (OF22)
The Lebanese Government initiated the process of transforming Lebanon into a digital nation. Huge Projects are implemented by OGERO Telecom, starting with enhancing the transport network, implementing Fiber access to the users, upgrading existing submarine cables, enabling IoT services, establishing Startup incubator and Data center. In addition, the Ministry of Telecoms launched the Lebanese IGF initiative and currently is coordinating an overarching ICT strategy for Sustainable Development.
Tag 1: Digital Transformation
Tag 2:IXP 
Tag 3: NRIs
Tag 4: Digital Government
Tag 5: Technology and Innovation
Name(s) of Speaker(s):
Mr Antoine Aoun (on digital transformation)
Ms Salam Yamout (on Lebanon IXP)
Ms Roula Mikhael (on LIGF)
Ms Tanya Zaroubi (on Digital Government)
Mr Nicolas Rouhana (on Financing Technology and Innovation)

Content:

1-      Digital Transformation/FTTH – 10 min

The Lebanese Government initiated the process of transforming Lebanon into a digital nation. Huge Projects are implemented by OGERO Telecom, starting with enhancing the transport network, implementing Fiber access to the users, to upgrading existing submarine cables, enabling IoT services, establishing Startup incubator and Data center.

2-      Digital Government- 10 min

a. Digital Government Principles

b. Digital Transformation Enablers

c. Digital Architecture

d. Existing Situation and Future Projects

3-      IXP -  10 min

Lebanon Internet Exchange project

4-      Lebanon IGF initiative- 10 min

Lebanon engagement in the Internet Governance process, formation of the Lebanese MAG and brief on the 1st event held to publicly announce the start of preparations for 2018 LIGF Forum.

5-      Entrepreneurship -10 min

how the Central Bank of Lebanon contributed to the recent leapfrog of the Lebanese entrepreneurship eco-system through the proliferation of VC funds, accelerators, bootcamps, etc.

6-      Open discussion  and Lebanese Sweets.

Name of Online Moderator:Ms Zeina Bou Harb 
Background Paper: Digital Transformation.pdf
Past IGF Participation: No
Report Link:
Name: Ms. Bou Harb Zeina
Organizational Affiliation: OGERO Telecom
 

Session Organizers
avatar for Zeina BOU HARB

Zeina BOU HARB

Head of International Cooperation, OGERO Telecom


Tuesday December 19, 2017 15:00 - 16:00
Room XII - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

15:00

INTERNET SOCIETY OPEN FORUM - What actions should we take today to shape our digital future? (OF51)
Internet Society (ISOC) Open Forum is dedicated for the IGF participants that shares the common goal of advocating for an open, resilient, trusted Internet, and our own ISOC community comprised of chapters, organizational and individual members. 

Building on our report on the Internet’s future, we can’t take the Internet or its future for granted. There are many challenges and uncertainties – and the direction in which they evolve will have a profound impact on the Internet, users, and society. Ultimately, the future of the Internet will be shaped by decisions we make today, at the IGF and other fora. What are the actions we can take now that will shape it towards the future we expect?

We aim to promote an interactive session with participants to tackle access and trust challenges, with key questions:

As we envision all 7 billion people (and trillions of devices and sensors) connected, what are roles of initiatives on the ground that are making it happen like community networks?

In order to overcome cybersecurity threats through a strong collaborative security approach, what are the steps we can take ahead, such as the African Internet Infrastructure Security Guidelines?
Tag 1: Future Internet
Tag 2: Community Networks
Tag 3: Trust
Name(s) of Speaker(s):
Kathy Brown
Sally Wentworth
Raul Echeberria
Frederick Donck
Constance Bommelaer
Jane Coffin
Maarit Palorvita
Dawit Bekele

Name of Online Moderator: Raquel Gatto
Background Paper:
Past IGF Participation: Yes
Report Link: http://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/index.php?q=filedepot_download/4115/350
Name: Ms. Raquel Gatto
Organizational Affiliation: Internet Society

Tuesday December 19, 2017 15:00 - 16:00
Room XXI - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

15:00

DC on Internet of Things

TOWARDS GLOBAL GOOD PRACTICE IN IOT
(please find the opening presentation below)

The IGF Dynamic Coalition on the Internet of Things (IoT) brings together stakeholders from all over the world to engage in a dialogue on “good practice” in IoT, with the intent to find a realistic and long term sustainable way forward.

Since the 3rd Internet Governance Forum (IGF) meeting in Hydrabad (2008), IoT has been on the agenda for multi-stakeholder discussions of all IGFs, and the Dynamic Coalition on IoT continues to raise attention for the potential as well as challenges of the emergence of a world in which increasing amounts of sensors and actuators connected to the Internet and collect, act and share data, with other things and people.

The Internet of Things is developing at increasing speed and rapidly becoming a necessity in many sectors, in order to be able to provide services that otherwise would not have been possible or affordable. At the same time, over the last year the IoT has also been used in DDOS attacks and for other criminal and/or harmful actions.With this, establishing a global bottom line of good practice is becoming increasing urgent to ensure we find ourselves in a world that respects and supports people and society, and that offers effective and affordable services for all.

The DC workshop is oriented around 3 key issues that are reflecting our current thinking working towards a common appreciation of IoT good practice in 2016.  These ideas are at the core of the draft declaration on IoT best practice that has been published on the IGF website. The ideas on which we would like to receive feedback are:

  1. Securing the IoT is a key issue, in the knowing the IoT is fulfilling increasingly critical functions, that IoT devices remain in use for often indefinite times, and have been used over the past year for DDOS attacks etc.
    1. What incentives for industry to ensure sufficient security
    2. What can technology development do to enhance security in ways that can be embraced by users;
    3. How can standard setting help;
  2. IoT to address societal challenges: Overall, IoT was seen as “coming” and “promising” and necessary to be able to address specific societal challenges. In this it is important to ensure developing countries can and will benefit from IoT applications as well, such as in agriculture and disaster warning systems:
    1. How to ensure affordability of key technologies
    2. What can/should be done in terms of capacity building
    3. How can standard setting help
  3. The third element is the “safety net” element: how can we ensure independent trusted expertise is available to further explore whether systems are doing what they promise, and attributing actions and responsibilities. And what can be done to provide insurance for systems failing.

Feedback and suggestions are welcome.

Agenda

  1. Opening, introduction of the why and what of the draft declaration on IoT Best Practices by Maarten Botterman, Chairman DC IoT, ICANN Board, (5 min.)
  2. Background to the draft declaration: history and thoughts on ways forward by Wolfgang Kleinwaechter, founding member of DT IoT, University of Arhus (5 min.)
  3. Panel, moderated, with 6 representatives from all sectors (20 min.)
  4. Open discussion with all participants and panel), moderated by Avri Doria (30 min.)


Committed contributors:

For this session, we have asked representatives from government, industry, civil society and the technical community to prepare some opening statements in the full understanding that IoT is inevitable, and an increasing part of the fabric of our society; and that it comes with challenges we need to address, from multiple stakeholders' perspectives, in order to make sure we are building a society we are willing to live in. 
We are looking forward to introductions by the following delegates: 

  • Dr. Daniela Brönstrup has been Deputy Director-General for Digital Policy, Postal Policy, International Affairs, and Media in the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) since autumn 2015. Previously, she was head of unit for International and European Economic and Monetary Affairs as well as Financial Policy at BMWi. From 2007 to 2010, she was responsible for economics, finance, labour and social security at the Federal President's Office. Ms. Brönstrup was part of the German Delegation that participated to the G7 meeting in Torino that adapted the “Torino Declaration”, see here: http://www.g7italy.it/sites/default/files/documents/G7_ICT_and_Industruy_Ministers%27_Declaration_2017.pdf
  • Sebastián Bellagamba is the Regional Director for Latin America and the Caribbean for the Internet Society. Prior to joining ISOC, Sebastián worked in the Internet Service Providers industry, founding and running several ISPs in Argentina and also managing regional Latin America operations. At that time, he was also President of the Argentine Internet Industry Association (CABASE). ISOC has developed a white paper on IoT to inform the debate from an Internet user’s perspective: see https://www.internetsociety.org/resources/doc/2015/iot-overview
  • Marco Hogewoning is External Relations Officer - Technical Advisor with the RIPE NCC. As part of the External Relations team, he helps lead the RIPE NCC's engagement with membership, the RIPE community, government, law enforcement and other Internet stakeholders. He is very active on IoT policies development from a technical community perspective, and has been instrumental in setting up a specific working group at RIPE, see here: https://www.ripe.net/participate/ripe/wg/iot
  • Eric Loeb is AT&T SVP - International External & Legislative Affairs.  His work supports the AT&T international portfolios, including fixed, mobile and satellite platforms, for the delivery of communications, entertainment and Internet of Things (IoT) solutions. For a peak at AT&T’s IoT portfolio, look at https://www.business.att.com/solutions/Portfolio/internet-of-things/
  • Arthur van der Wees (www.arthurslegal.com): legal expert in IoT, security and data protection with a global footprint. Arthur is founding member of the Alliance for IoT Innovation (AIOTI) (www.aioti.org), co-author of the IoT Handbooks 2016 and 2017 of IERC, and Board Director of the Institute for Accountability and Internet Democracy.

Moderator:

Avri Doria is a Principal Researcher with Technicalities, a research group supporting human rights and public interest concerns. She is a key contributor to the work of DC IoT, and Board Member of ICANN. She has been deeply involved in a variety of functions within ICANN and GNSO since 2005. In 2005 she was elected to the GNSO council to represent the NCSG. In 2013 she served as a member of the Accountability and Transparency Review Team that reviewed ICANN’s governance model. In June 2014 at ICANN 50 in London, Avri received the first ever ICANN Multistakeholder Ethos Award. 


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The IGF DC IoT is an open, global platform that proposes taking ethical considerations into account from the outset, both in the development, deployment and use phases of the life cycle, thus to find a sustainable way ahead using IoT helping to create a free, secure and enabling rights based environment. The text of the IoT Global Good Practice paper can be found and commented at https://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/content/internet-of-things-good-practice-policies-dc-on-internet-of-things.  

Chairman of the DC IoT is Maarten Botterman is Director of GNKS Consult BV and has over 25 years relevant experience on Internet and IT Technologies, Governance, and how it affects the way we work, live and organize our societies. He is Chairman of the IGF Dynamic Coalition since IGF 2014. Currently, he is. also Board Member of ICANN, Chairman of the Policy Expert Group of PICASSO, and Chairman of the Supervisory Board of NLnet Foundation. His work has included projects of relevance for IoT since 2001, including recent work on standards, security, and data protection. For more information on his work see www.gnksconsult.com.

Please watch this space for further updates.For more information on the Coalition, please go to http://www.iot-dynamic-coalition.org/

...

Session Organizers
avatar for Maarten Botterman

Maarten Botterman

Board Director, ICANN
As an active participant of the global Internet community my main interests are in internet governance issues, and emerging issues such as the need to continuously improve the working and thus justified trust in the Internet, including Internet of Things, big data, privacy & data... Read More →



Tuesday December 19, 2017 15:00 - 16:00
Room XXIII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

15:00

Assessing implications of Internet Shutdowns according to Internet Governance Principles (WS178)

Proposer's Name: Mr. Hartmut Glaser
Proposer's Organization: Brazilian Internet Steering Committee (CGI.br)
Co-Proposer's Name: Mr. Juliano Cappi
Co-Proposer's Organization: NIC.br
Co-Organizers:
Mr.,Carlos,DESOUZA,CivilSociety,Instituto de Tecnologia e Sociedade - ITS-Rio

Session Format: Round Table - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: Brazil
Stakeholder Group: Technical Community

Co-Proposer:
Country: Brazil
Stakeholder Group: Technical Community

Participants:
Carlos Affonso (Civil Society, ITS Rio, Brazil)
Kyung-Sin Park (Technical Community, Korea University / Open Net Korea)
Monica Rosina (Private Sector, Facebook, Brazil)
Neide Oliveira (Government Sector, Federal Prosecution Service, Brazil)
Paul Fehlinger (Civil Society, Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network)
Peter Micek (Civil Society, Access Now, US)
Stefanie Felsberger (Civil Society, A2K4D, Egypt)
Susan Chalmers (Government Sector, NTIA, US)
Thiago Tavares (Civil Society, SaferNet, Brazil)

Content of the Session:

This workshop aims at discussing the shutdown of Internet applications and services in selected countries, delving into their motivations and impacts considering the technical, economic and social perspectives. Debates about the interruption of access to Internet services and content are not recent. In 2011, during the “Arab Spring”, websites like Twitter and Facebook were cut off within Egypt in an attempt of the government to prevent social media from being used to foment political protests. Despite some policy advances in the past few years, in 2016, Vladmir Putin threatened to block Google, Twitter and Facebook if they didn’t comply with a demand of data from Russian bloggers. Last December, Justice John Nicholas from the Australian Federal Court, ordered Internet service providers (ISPs) to “take reasonable steps to disable access” to Pirate Bay, Torrentz, and the streaming service SolarMovie, in a bid to crack down on online copyright infringement. The suggested strategy to block the applications was using the domain name system (DNS). In Brazil, the subject returned to the center of the debates between in 2015, mainly due to the action of the judiciary, which issued decisions on the blocking of Whatsapp throughout the country; a measure that affected citizens and organizations from other countries in the region. The decisions looked at telecommunication network operators and ISPs and led to discussions at the Legislative and the Supreme Court.
In this context, the proposed agenda includes a debate on the following issues: a) shutdown as a mechanism for law enforcement; b) challenges and risks of implementing application blocking; c) Internet Governance Principles at stake (net neutrality, freedom of expression, innovation).
Panelists will be invited to discuss the emergence of this new “Internet shutdowns trend” in a round-table. There will be an initial presentation to set the scene that will be followed by an open discussion. In order to stimulate the debate, representatives from government, technical community, civil society, lawyers and Internet applications will be invited to join the discussion.

Relevance of the Session:
This proposal is relevant to the extent that it seeks to broaden the scope of analysis that focus on Internet shutdowns, considering the technical economical and social impacts of its implementation and the various constraints involved in the cases of interruption of access to applications worldwide.
Despite the emergence of new cases regarding interruption of access to some specific Internet applications in the last years, many disputes and conflicts generated by its implementation have not been settled at all. Apparently, government institutions are using that strategy as an essential instrument to enforce national legal systems on transnational services. From a legal perspective, it is important to highlight that case law on the issue is scarce in many countries and that the technicalities of the Internet are still a challenge for justice operators who are striving to make sense of the complexity of the matter.. From a technical perspective, the implementation of application blocking is a challenge that involves many different instances of the Internet. The implementation on the physical layer may lack precision, resulting on the exclusion of unexpected groups of Internet users and even unexpected Internet services. The use of the Domain Name System to block a given application may raise questions on the role of Internet registries, registrars, name server providers, hosting providers, etc., which are entitled fundamentally of operating domain names. Finally, from the social perspective the increase in the number of cases of application blocking cases may endanger basic Internet Governance principles like Network Neutrality, freedom of expression and innovation – having a particular impact on developing countries. It is fundamental to bring together different actors involved in the implementation of application blocking to debate the issue in a multistakeholder, interdisciplinary and international context in order to advance in comprehending this phenomena and identifying its causes in order to put attention to them from different perspectives.

Tag 1: Blocking
Tag 2: Net Neutrality
Tag 3: Freedom of Expression Online

Interventions:
The session is structured around three 30-minute segments. The first will count on a general introduction about the topic under discussion by one of the moderators. He will summarize his briefing by posing a policy question to the participants. The question will be related the overall impacts of Internet shutdowns and application blocking observed in different regions. A 20-minute segment will follow in which participants in the round-table will be able to make 2-minute interventions at a time. In the second 30-minute segment, the other moderator will present some conceptual and practical challenges related the tensions between localization and the transnational nature of Internet flows, with a special focus on the issue of jurisdiction. He/she will provoke participants to look into the future with a policy question related to the “challenges for the next decade” in relation to issue of jurisdiction. Another 20-minute segment will follow in which participants in the round-table will be able to make 2-minute interventions at a time. The last part of the session will comprise a 30-minute open mic session that will be based on a policy question that delves into “the role of the multistakeholder community in coping with the facts and challenges listed in the previous segments”. The five last minutes of the third segment will be used by the moderators to summarize discussions.

The workshop participants are:

Moderators
Paul Fehlinger (Civil Society, Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network)
Thiago Tavares (Civil Society, SaferNet, Brazil)

Speakers
Carlos Affonso (Civil Society, ITS Rio, Brazil)
Kyung-Sin Park (Technical Community, Korea University / Open Net Korea)
Monica Rosina (Private Sector, Facebook, Brazil)
Neide Oliveira (Government Sector, Federal Prosecution Service, Brazil)
Peter Micek (Civil Society, Access Now, US)
Stefanie Felsberger (Civil Society, A2K4D, Egypt)
Susan Chalmers (Government Sector, NTIA, US)

Diversity:

The perspective defined to approach the complexity of application blocking requires a broad diversity of participants to accomplish the workshop objectives. The selected cases of application blocking are from different countries, involve actors from different sectors of society and also demands a multidisciplinary approach considering the broad impact of its implementation. As Internet shutdowns may affect specific groups in different manners, gender diversity is also fundamental to understand and measure the problem.

Onsite Moderator: Paul Fhelinger - Civil Society, Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network
Onsite Moderator: Thiago Tavares - Civil Society, SaferNet, Brazil

Online Moderator: Diego Canabarro - Technical Community - NIC.br

Rapporteur: 
Jamila Venturini - Technical Community - NIC.br
Rapporteur: Vinicius W. O. Santos - Technical Community - NIC.br

Online Participation:
Online participation and interaction will rely on the WebEx platform. Those joining the session using WebEx (either invited members of the round-table or the general audience) will be granted the floor in the open debate segment of the workshop. People in charge of the moderation will strive to entertain onsite and remote participation indiscriminately. Social media (twitter and facebook) will also be employed by the online moderators who will be in charge of browsing social media using hashtags.

Discussion facilitation:
The discussion in the proposed session will be facilitated around three policy questions posed for the participants in the round-table as well as the audience in general: (1) what are overall impacts of Internet shutdowns and application blocking in different regions? (2) what are the challenges for the next decade in relation to issue of jurisdiction bearing in mind the tensions between localization and transnationality of Internet services and flows? And (3) what is the role of the multi

...

Session Organizers
avatar for Nathalia Sautchuk Patricio

Nathalia Sautchuk Patricio

Technical Advisor, NIC.br
I'm a computer engineer. I work as Technical Advisor for CGI.br and professor in some universities. My interests are: network neutrality, Education and ICT, Social and Digital Inclusion.
avatar for Vinicius W. O. Santos

Vinicius W. O. Santos

Technical advisor, NIC.br
avatar for Jamila Venturini

Jamila Venturini

CGI.br Advisory Team, NIC.br


Tuesday December 19, 2017 15:00 - 16:30
Room IX - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

15:00

Universal Design and Creating an Accessible Digital Future (WS54)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Kaoru Mizuno
Proposer's Organization: ITU
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Andrea Saks
Co-Proposer's Organization: G3iCT
Co-Organizers:
Dynamic Coalition on Accessibility and Disability (DCAD) (http://www.itu.int/en/ITU-T/accessibility/dcad/Pages/default.aspx)

Global Initiative for Inclusive ICTs (G3ict) (http://g3ict.com/ )


Session Format: Other - 90 Min
Format description: Open forum discussion preceded by brief presentations

Proposer:
Country: Switzerland
Stakeholder Group: Intergovernmental Organizations

Co-Proposer:
Country: United States
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speaker: Andrea Saks
Speaker: Gerry Ellis
Speaker: Gunela Astbrink
Speaker: Judith Ann Okite
Speaker: Shadi Abou-Zahra

Content of the Session:
Since the approval of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) in 2006, much efforts have been made to achieve an inclusive society for everyone, including persons with disabilities and persons with specific needs. Their voices are starting to be heard, and the progress is reported in participation of persons with disabilities in decision-making processes at national level. However in many countries, this is still an area for improvement.
It is important to understand that disability is not attached to just a few persons but to all of us especially when we age, and that we need to remove barriers in society in order to allow persons with disabilities and those with age related disabilities to enjoy their rights on equal basis with others
“Universal design" is defined by UNCRPD Article 2 and means the design of products, environments, programmes and services to be usable by all people, to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design. "Universal design" shall not exclude assistive devices for particular groups of persons with disabilities where this is needed.
ICT technologies can play an important role in achieving an inclusive society. If universal design is considered at an early stage of the development of ICT technologies and systems, then expensive refits can be avoided. If this is not done, there is a risk of creating new barriers to accessibility.
Taking into consideration rapid development and prevalence of Internet of Things (IoT) technologies worldwide, it is urgent to promote, among others, key principals, concept and practice of universal design, and take appropriate measures for the implementation globally interoperable.
This workshop will discuss these issues and identify the way forward towards a truly inclusive society through ICT technologies.


Relevance of the Session:
The goal of the workshop is to raise awareness to everyone that it is imperative to achieve an inclusive society. ICT accessibility for persons with disabilities and those with specific needs can be achieved only by including them in the discussions around the Internet Governance and the creation of accessible ICT products and services. Their voices must be heard by governments, regulators, designers and standard writers so that our Digital Future will be accessible for everyone. 

Tag 1: Enhancing Accessibility for Persons with Disabilities
Tag 2: Access and Diversity
Tag 3: 

Interventions:
All proposed speakers' views/perspectives/expertise have been discussed during DCAD conference calls and agreed by the DCAD members. The speakers will briefly make presentation, then they will receive questions from the audience. This is to increase audience participation time and encourage discussion.

Diversity:
All proposed speakers are international experts on accessibility for persons with disabilities, diversity in gender and region/country, including speakers from developing countries. 

Onsite Moderator: Andrea Saks
Online Moderator: Kaoru Mizuno
Rapporteur: Kaoru Mizuno

Online Participation:
There will be designated onsite moderator for remote participation. The workshop will use the ITU Guidelines for supporting remote participation in meetings for all (http://www.itu.int/pub/T-TUT-FSTP-2015-ACC). The moderator will have the full list of remote participants and their affiliations. Should there be persons who are blind participating remotely who cannot access directly the remote participation tool, due to the fact that they are not able to access the 'hand-raising' mechanism with their screen reader, they will be recognized by the Chair during all question & answer sessions so that they are able to make comments directly. 

Discussion facilitation:
The moderator of the workshop will at the beginning take a roll call of all the participants and their affiliations, so that the moderator can call on individuals to comment on subject pertaining to their interest. A list of questions will be prepared in advance to ask both the speakers and the audience so that the discussion will be interactive and inclusive. 

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: Yes
Link to Report: http://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/index.php?q=filedepot_download/4098/356

Additional Speakers: 

Masahito Kawamori, ITU-T Q26/16 Rapporteur, Keio University

Muhammad Shabbir, Islamabad Pakistan Chapter

Agenda: 

  1. Introduction to the workshop topic by Andrea Saks, onsite moderator of the workshop
  2. Brief presentations by accessibility experts to raise issues
  • Universal design – principles and practice, by Gunela Astbrink, Women With Disabilities Australia
  • Impairment, Disability and Universal Design, Key concepts for Accessibility, by Gerry Ellis, Feel The BenefIT
  • Standardization efforts at ITU for an accessible global future, by Masahito Kawamori, ITU-T Q26/16 Rapporteur, Keio University
  • Next Generation Web Accessibility Guidelines, by Shadi Abou-Zahra, World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)
  • ICT Accessibility in Pakistan: Challenges and Opportunities, by Muhammad Shabbir, Islamabad Pakistan Chapter

3. Open discussion stimulated by the onsite moderator

4. Wrap-up of the discussion

 


Session Organizers
AJ

Andrea J. Saks

Chairman JCA-AHF, ITU
ACCESSIBILITY FOR PERSON WITH DISABILITIES BOTH VIRTUAL AND PHYSICAL, TO INCLUDE REMOTE PARTICIPATION AND REMOTE PARTICIPATION TOOLS THAT STILL ARE INACCESSIBLE TO THE BLIND BETTER ACCESS TO ICTS INCLUDING BROADBAND , LONG DISTANCE LEARNING, REMOTE EDUCATION,ACCESSIBLE WEB SITES AND... Read More →


Tuesday December 19, 2017 15:00 - 16:30
Room XXVII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

15:00

Governance Innovation in the Age of Sharing Economy (WS133)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Liyun Han
Proposer's Organization: China Internet Network Information Center(CNNIC)
Co-Proposer's Name: Mr. Rui Zhong
Co-Proposer's Organization: Internet Society of China (ISC)
Co-Organizers:
Dr., Liyun HAN, Technical Community, China Internet Network Information Center (CNNIC) Mr., Rui ZHONG, Civil Society, Internet Society of China (ISC) Ms., Jing MA, Civil Society, China Association for Science and Technology (CAST) Prof., Qingguo MENG, Academia, Center for Internet Governance (CIG), Tsinghua University, Mr., Jinhe LIU, PhD student, Research Center for Media Economics and Management, Tsinghua University

Session Format: Round Table - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: China
Stakeholder Group: Technical Community

Co-Proposer:
Country: China
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speaker: Xiao Zhang
Speaker: Zhibin HUI

Content of the Session:
“HYPER CONNECTIVITY” breeds and fosters the idea of “SHARING”, a spirit to reallocate resources to where they are valued more. Built around the sharing of physical and intellectual resources, “SHARING ECONOMY” is making a fine figure world widely with people using services ranging from vehicleshares to homeshares. Whist services and start-ups enabling P2P exchanges through technology have sprung up, this is only the beginning: in its entirety and potential, SHARING ECONOMY is to bring revolution across all aspects of social and economic life.
SHARING ECONOMY is blooming while experiencing growing pains, like regulatory uncertainty, trust issues, interest disputes etc. A lot of policy issues related to the governance of SHARING ECONOMY need to be addressed, such as:
1. Economy policy: sharing economy is a new economic pattern of restructuring and integrating the social idle resource, especially with the driving force of ICTs, it enables every one or each entity to get involved in the economy activity, especially in rural areas of developing countries. However, issues as tax, price rationality, intellectual property right protection, online fraud, dispute mediation had not been fully discussed.
2. Government regulatory: sharing economy is newly emerging and undoubtedly affects the traditional group's interests and rule. Governance is for development. What kind of policy government should take to reduce differentiation and imbalanced development calls for more consideration and wisdom.
3. Platform responsibility: the application platform should develop effective mechanism to benefit more people and protect user's personal information, avoiding government power abuse and hacker attack.
4. User self-discipline: practical measure or policy should be developed to improve user's behavior and protect public interest during the conduct of sharing economy. This workshop is to review the prospect and challenges during the rise of the sharing economy, exchange the experiences and practices on economy growth and regional balance. Collaborative Governance with multi-stakeholders' participation will shape a sharing economy benefited to everyone, enhance social diversity and support the joint efforts to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Relevance of the Session:
This session is designed to make a direct attack on the governance challenges emerging with the increased coverage and complexity of digitalization, in regards to governance objects, tools and approaches. It brings sharing economy, a new and active digital economy pattern into focus, to review how the Internet and society governance model is developing from going in one-way to multistakeholder as well as online and offline cooperation. What the session discusses include re-identifying the roles of government, platform, enterprise, users and consumers, technology providers etc. in a new ecosystem, exploring policy evolvement and even social ethics, which are topics that really matter in shaping our digital future. 

Tag 1: Internet Economy
Tag 2: Multistakeholder Cooperation
Tag 3: Internet & ICTs for the Sustainable Development Goals

Interventions:
The workshop involves speakers from the different stakeholders including the typical representative enterprises in the field of sharing economy, representatives from the civil society such as Association for Science and Technology and Internet Society, the academic researchers from the well-known universities, institutes as well as think tanks, the participants of technical community and the government official, who will demonstrate and interpret the blooming development and propose the future actions to answer the emerging challenges of SHARING ECONOMY from their perspective positions.
The speakers from DIDI Chuxing, Ofo, 58.com which are forerunner corporations in China will share the developing experience of sharing transportation, community Leasing and service platform, the chief analyst from Tencent Research Institute will describe the interpretation report on the share economic trend in China launched by Tencent Research Institute.
The speakers from the academia such as DiploFoundation, National Research University of Russia, Tsinghua University, Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences will view the evolving process of the E-economy and the relevance to the IG ecosystem.
The speakers from the associate and Internet Society can share the thoughts on the sharing economy from the aspect of industry structure.
The speakers with the technology expertise including Prof. Xiaodong Lee, Prof. Zhou Xiang, Dr. Kong and Satish Babu will discuss the role of technology innovation such as big data, IoT and open source in promoting sharing economy.
We also invited the government officials from the Cyberspace of Administration of China (CAC) who is to be confirmed can talk about the annual government report and policies relevant to the governance of sharing economy.
The proposer will follow up with the confirmed speakers to specify who will give the presentation and who will contribute to the workshop trough discussion and dialogue. 

Diversity:
1.Diversity of speaker stakeholder: We have invited experts from multistakeholders, such as enterprises, civil society, academia, technical community and government officials.
2.First-time participant: most of our co-organizers are the old faces to IGF who have the familiar experience and contributed to annual IGF via organizing workshops over consecutive four years. Tsinghua University is the first time to participate IGF.
3.Diversity of regions: Our participants are from China, Russia, India, Swiss and others.

Onsite Moderator: Dr. Liyun HAN
Online Moderator: Ms. Julie ZHU
Rapporteur: Ms. Shuyi GUO

Online Participation:
The workshop is encouragdged and panned for remote participation. Julie ZHU, the researcher of the Center for Internet Governance (CIG) of Tsinghua University, is appointed to the remote moderator, cooperating with the IGF staff, she willcoordinate the online participating system and collect the questions and key points from the remote participants, while she will keep the close interaction with the onsite moderator to convey the information and facilitate the Q&A between the onsite and online participants.

Discussion facilitation:
Agenda(90MINs):
1.【5mins】The moderator will open the session by welcoming participants, framing the topic, briefly introducing panelists and mentioning their commitment in the discussion.
2.【40mins】Formal Presentations from some panelists.
3.【20mins】After presentation, the moderator will engage the panelists in a lively conversation to get their perspectives on the questions as outlined below.
①Optimizing the relationship between supply and demand with intelligent sharing tools.
②Interest distribution among key resource holders.
③Roles of government, industry and other players involved in the market.
④Interesting predictions about the future of sharing economy.
4.【15mins】The moderator will elicit what panelists found most insightful from the discussion, and build on them by asking questions to create a dynamic flow of interaction among the panelists.
5.【5mins】the moderator will invite the audience to pose brief questions to the panelists, asking audience members to identify themselves. (The moderator may consider engaging the audience earlier)
6.【5mins】With 5 minutes left, the moderator will share the top takeaways from the discussion and bring the session to a close. 

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: Yes
Link to Report: http://www.intgovforum.org/cms/2015-igf-joao-pessoa/workshops/list-of-published-workshop-proposals

Additional Speakers: 

1.Danil Kerimi, Head, IT and Electronics Industries, World Economic Forum 2.Dr. Jovan Kurbalija, Director, DiploFoundation & Head, Geneva Internet Platform 3.Michael Kende, Senior Advisor at Analysys Mason, and guest professor at the Graduate Institute of Geneva 4.Dr. Mikhail M. Komarov, deputy head for international relations, School of business informatics, National Research University. 5.Dr. Prof. Xiaodong Lee, Co-chair of Center for Internet Governance (CIG) ,Tsinghua University 6.Prof. Xiang Zhou, Head of Major project division at Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth (RADI), Professor o

...

Session Organizers
avatar for Liyun Han

Liyun Han

Policy Executive, CNNIC


Tuesday December 19, 2017 15:00 - 16:30
Room XXIV - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

15:00

Combating Online Violence Against Politically-Active Women (WS166)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Kirsten Zeiter
Proposer's Organization: National Democratic Institute (NDI)
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Amanda Domingues
Co-Proposer's Organization: National Democratic Institute (NDI)
Co-Organizers:
Ms.,Amanda, Domingues, Civil Society, National Democratic Institute
Ms.,Sandra,Pepera, Civil Society, National Democratic Institute 


Session Format: Panel - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: United States
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Co-Proposer:
Country: United States
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speaker: Nathan Matias
Speaker: Soraya Chemaly
Speaker: Nighat Dad
Speaker: David Kaye

Content of the Session:
This session will be a multi-sector panel discussion about strategies for understanding and combating online violence against politically-active women. Online harassment of politically-active women is one form of the global problem of violence against women in politics (VAW-P), and can result in women choosing not to participate in leadership or political debates, and ultimately not to express their opinion. The resulting limitation of both the number of women able to participate and the range of issues discussed poses a fundamental challenge to democracy, progress towards gender equality and women’s empowerment, as well as to the integrity of the information space. The panel will engage experts from multiple sectors including digital activism, women's empowerment, technology, and international governance, to discuss methods for building international understanding of this issue and identifying strategies for combating it.

Relevance of the Session:
As political discourse increasingly shifts online, a free, open and inclusive internet where all citizens can engage in dialogue is critical to modern democracy. However, in too many places, citizens’ ability to engage in political discourse online is under threat by online activity by individuals and organizations that seek to silence or exclude the voices of women and other marginalized groups, such as online violence against politically-active women. This type of activity can have the devastating impact of driving women, and especially young women, away from online political discourse - ultimately undermining the integrity of the information space and of democratic culture and practice. This issue pertains directly to the IGF 2017 main theme, "Shape Your Digital Future," because if women, and especially young women, are not able to participate equally in online spaces due to online violence, they will not be able to be part of the decision-making that shapes their digital future.

Tag 1: Gender Issues
Tag 2: Digital Inclusion
Tag 3: Human Rights Online

Interventions:
This panel will facilitate discussion between multiple experts across sectors, who can leverage their expertise in gender equality, civic technologies, and internet governance to discuss how to understand and combat online violence against politically-active women. Each speaker will share their perspective and experience with this issue, the approaches they have employed, the challenges that remain, and next steps for understanding and combating online violence against politically-active women. Specifically, Nathan Matias will discuss his technical research on factors that contribute to fair participation online, and approaches to large scale experiments on reducing harassment online. Soraya Chemaly will contribute her perspective as a leading writer, activist, and advocate for curbing online abuse, media and tech diversity, and expanding women's freedom of expression. Nighat Dad is the Executive Director of Digital Rights Foundation, Pakistan. She is an accomplished lawyer and a human rights activist. Nighat Dad is the Executive Director of Digital Rights Foundation, Pakistan. She is an accomplished lawyer and a human rights activist. Nighat Dad will share her experience as a pioneer campaigning around access to open internet in Pakistan and globally, campaigning and engaging at a policy level on issues focusing on Internet Freedom, Women and technology, Digital Security and Women’s empowerment. As UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Freedom of Opinion and Expressions, David Kaye will provide insight into intergovernmental approaches to combating online violence against politically-active women, particularly as it pertains to issues of freedom of expression. Together, these perspectives and experiences will contribute to a nuanced and multi-faceted discussion that takes into account multiple sectors, regions, and stakeholder groups.

Diversity:
The speakers and moderator of the panel represent varying genders, geographic backgrounds, age groups, stakeholder group, and policy perspectives. To further facilitate diversity and participant interaction, the discussion also plans for digital participation and engagement. The panel moderator will further take every effort to ensure diversity in participation during the Q&A / discussion session at the conclusion of the panel, to ensure a variety of voices have the opportunity to contribute meaningfully to the discussion.


Onsite Moderator: Sandra Pepera, Civil Society, National Democratic Institute
Online Moderator: Amanda Domingues, Civil Society, National Democratic Institute
Rapporteur: Kirsten Zeiter, Civil Society, National Democratic Institute

Online Participation:
This panel will be livestreamed in Washington, DC for civil society, democracy and governance, and women's empowerment experts. Twitter will also be used to promote the panel discussion and facilitate live interaction with an international audience. Our online moderator, Amanda Domingues, will participate online as well and feed questions from these participants up to the panel in real time in order to develop a robust global discussion.

Discussion facilitation:
Moderated by Sandra Pepera, each speaker will have the opportunity to share their perspectives on raising awareness of and combating online violence against politically-active women. In order to facilitate a lively dialogue between the speakers, Ms. Pepera will open the floor to allow each speaker to share their perspectives through a series of guiding questions. There will be opportunity throughout the panelist discussion for panelists to interact with one-another and address points raised by the panel. Following this, there will be time for questions and discussion from the audience within IGF and through online participation.

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: No
Link to Report: 

Additional Speakers: 

Dr. Dubravka Šimonović (confirmed in principle)
United Nations Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women

Ms. Dubravka Šimonovic was appointed as United Nations Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences in June 2015 by the UN Human Rights Council for an initial three years' tenure (maximum tenure of six years). She started her tenure on 1 August 2015.

Ms. Šimonović was a member of the CEDAW Committee between 2002 and 2014, and served as its Chairperson in 2007 and 2008, its follow-up Rapporteur from 2009 to 2011 and as the Chairperson of the Optional Protocol Working Group in 2011.

For a number of years she headed the Human Rights Department at the Ministry for Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Croatia and was posted as the Minister Plenipotentiary at the Permanent Mission of Croatia to the United Nations in New York.  She was also the Ambassador to the OSCE and United Nations in Vienna, Austria. She was the Chairperson of the UN Commission on the Status of Women between 2001 and 2002 and also worked as a member of the UNIFEM Consultative Committee. Ms Šimonović served on the UN Women Advisory panel producing the report Progress of the World’s Women: In pursuit of Justice.

At the regional level she was the Chair and Vice Chair of the Council of Europe’s Task Force to combat violence against women, including domestic violence in 2006 and 2007.  Between 2008 and 2010, she co-chaired the Ad hoc Committee (CAHVIO) that elaborated the Convention on Preventing and Combating Violence against Women and Domestic Violence.

Ms. Šimonović holds a PhD in family law from the University of Zagreb. She is the author of several books and articles on women’s rights and violence against women. She also lectured at the Harvard Law School, Nottingham University, Urban Morgan Institute for Human Rights (University of Cincinnati) and at the Women’s Human Rights Training Institute organized by the Bulgarian Gender Research Foundation.

Dr Dubravka Šimonovic is a Visiting Professor in Practice in the Centre for Women, Peace and Security at LSE.

Agenda: 

Welcome and Introduction: Sandra Pepera (moderator) (10 minutes)

Panelist Interventions (35 minutes, 7 minutes for each speaker)
- Dr. Dubravka Šimonović 
- Soraya Chemaly
- Nathan Mathias
- Nighat Dad
- David Kaye

Moderator-Guided follow-up questions (15 minutes)
Audience Questions and Discussion (30 minutes)

 

 

...

Session Organizers

Tuesday December 19, 2017 15:00 - 16:30
Room XXII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

15:00

Data Localization and Barriers to Crossborder Data Flows (WS32)

Proposer's Name: Mr. William Drake
Proposer's Organization: University of Zurich
Co-Proposer's Name: Mr. Richard Samans
Co-Proposer's Organization: World Economic Forum
Co-Organizers:
Ms. Fiona Alexander, government, Government of the United States of America Mr. Vint Cerf, private sector, Google Mr. William J. Drake, civil society, University of Zurich Ms. Anriette Esterhuysen, civil society, Association for Progressive Communication Mr. Ricardo Meléndez-Ortiz, civil society, International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development Mr. Richard Samans, private sector, World Economic Forum Mr. Thomas Schneider, government, Government of Switzerland Ms. Hong Xue, civil society, Beijing Normal University Institute for Internet Policy & Law

Session Format: Round Table - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: Switzerland
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Co-Proposer:
Country: Switzerland
Stakeholder Group: Private Sector

Speaker: William Drake
Speaker: Richard Samans
Speaker: Alexander Fiona
Speaker: Anriette Esterhuysen
Speaker: Vint Cerf
Speaker: Raul Echeberria
Speaker: Torbjörn Fredriksson
Speaker: Wolfgang Kleinwächter
Speaker: Goran Marby
Speaker: Ricardo Meléndez-Ortiz
Speaker: Marietje Schaake
Speaker: Thomas Schneider
Speaker: Lee Tuthill
Speaker: Mary Uduma
Speaker: Hong Xue

Content of the Session:
The past few years have witnessed an increasingly intense debate on the world-wide growth of national data localization restrictions and barriers to Cross-Border Data Flows (CBDF). Data localization proposals and policies typically involved requirements such as: data must be processed by entities physically within a national territory; data processing must include a specific level of “local content,” or the use of locally provided services or equipment; data must be locally stored or “resident” in a national jurisdiction; data processing and/or storage must conform to national rather than internationally accepted technical and operational standards; or data transfers must be routed largely or solely within a national or regional space when possible. Barriers to CBDF may involve: prohibitions on the transfer of personally identifiable information to jurisdictions deemed to have inadequate laws regarding privacy and data protection; censorship and other limitations on information that governments deem to be ‘sensitive;’ or digital trade protectionism. Governments’ motivations for establishing such policies vary and may include goals such as promoting local industry, technology development, employment, and tax revenue; protecting their citizens’ privacy (or in some cases, claiming to); ensuring access to data for the purposes of law enforcement, and more broadly defending their legal jurisdiction over data; or advancing national security or an expansive vision of “cyber-sovereignty.”

The stakes here are high. For example, the McKinsey Global Institute has estimated that data flows enabled economic activity that boosted global GDP by US $2.8 trillion in 2014, and that data flows now have a larger impact on growth than traditional flows of traded goods. The growth of localization measures and barriers to data transfers could reduce these values and significantly impair not only business operations but also economic development and many vital social processes that are predicated upon the movement of data across a relatively open and unfragmented Internet. Accordingly, specific language limiting such policies has been included in a number of “mega-regional” trade agreements, such as the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and the Trade in Services Agreement (TiSA). While the TPP has been rejected by the new US government and the forecast for other agreements is cloudy at best, it is possible that at least some of the policies in question are inconsistent with certain governments’ existing commitments under the World Trade Organization’s (WTO) General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS). Even so, the extent to which these issues should be addressed via trade instruments remains a highly controversial issue, with many in the global Internet community and civil society remaining very critical of non-transparent intergovernmental approaches to an increasingly important piece of global Internet governance, and many privacy advocates vehemently opposing the potential application of trade rules to personal data.

Accordingly, the purposes of this proposed workshop are four-fold. First, it would bring together senior participants in the international trade and Internet governance communities that to date have not had sufficient opportunities to dialogue on their respective approaches to these and related issues. Second, it would take stock of the growth of data localization measures and barriers to data flows and assess the scope and impacts of such policies. Third, it would consider what can be achieved via international trade instruments given the current geopolitical context. Fourth, and most importantly, it would explore the possibility of constructing a parallel track of multistakeholder dialogue and decisionmaking that is balanced and enjoys the support of diverse actors around the world. In particular, we would consider whether a global community of expertise and practice can be constructed to share information and devise effective normative agreements on the issues. Normative agreements involving sufficient monitoring and reporting could help to ensure that data policies are not applied in a manner that constitutes arbitrary discrimination or disguised digital protectionism, and do not impose restrictions that are greater than what is required to achieve legitimate public policy objectives.

The workshop would build on a report prepared by William J. Drake for the World Economic Forum (WEF) that is to be released in the autumn of 2017. This report will in turn build on a report on Internet Fragmentation by Drake, Vint Cerf, and Wolfgang Kleinwachter that was prepared for the WEF in 2016 www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_FII_Internet_Fragmentation_An_Overview_2016.pdf as well as the outputs of the WEF/ICTSD E15 Initiative on Strengthening the Global Trade and Investment System www.e15initiative.org. The workshop would be the fifth in a series of international meetings held in 2017 to gather inputs on the construction of a multistakholder expert community on the issues. 

Relevance of the Session:
The session would explore the potential relevance of the multistakeholder cooperation models employed in Internet governance processes in addressing a set of issues that largely have been discussed in international trade policy circles. The growth of data localization and CBDF barriers directly affects the openness of the Internet, a key concern in Internet governance. The trends are also directly relevant to whether we can indeed shape our global digital future in a manner that balances national objectives with the transnational data flows central to the Internet's functioning and social utility.

Tag 1: Multistakeholder Cooperation
Tag 2: Internet Governance
Tag 3: 

Interventions:
The onsite moderator will pose a series of questions to the discussants and encourage interactive discussion. These will encompass a) the policies and their impacts; b) the role of trade mechanisms; and c) the prospects for multistakeholder cooperation. The organizer and onsite moderator have both organized dozens of successful Roundtable discussions involving 15 or more participants, including at the IGF, and know how to manage the narrative flow of a conversation. The onsite moderator will get the discussants to respond to each other, ensure that they stay on point, and manage their time effectively. To optimize the time allocation, not all discussants will speak to every question posed; a baseline framework for managing this will be agreed online by the participants in advance.

Diversity:
The Roundtable speakers are roughly 1/3rd from the USA, 1/3rd from Europe, and 1/3rd from the global South. There are 10 men and 6 women. Their stakeholder group breakdown is: 3 governmental, 3 intergovernmental organizations, 3 private sector, 2 technical community, and 5 civil society/research. 11 could be identified as primarily from the Internet governance community, 5 could be identified as primarily from the international trade diplomacy community. They are also diverse in intellectual perspectives and political positions on the issues to be addressed.

Onsite Moderator: Richard Samans
Online Moderator: Adam Peake
Rapporteur: Adam Schlosser

Online Participation:
At the 50 minute mark the discussion will be opened to all participants in the room and online on an equal rotating basis. The very experienced remote moderator will signal remote participants to speak or, if the technology fails, will read their typed interventions. In addition, the rapporteur and another colleague will live tweet the meeting so it can be followed in that manner.

Discussion facilitation:
Prior to the meeting the roundtable discussants will coordinate online to agree a baseline set of topics to be covered

...

Session Organizers
avatar for William Drake

William Drake

International Fellow & Lecturer, University of Zurich
William J. Drake is an International Fellow and Lecturer in the Institute of Mass Communication and Media Research at the University of Zurich. Previous work experience has included: Senior Associate at the Centre for International Governance at the Graduate Institute for International... Read More →


Tuesday December 19, 2017 15:00 - 16:30
Room XXVI - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

15:00

NRIs Collaborative Session: Digital Currency and Blockchain Technology
The session will focus on the blockchain technology and digital currency development in different nations and some use case or examples will be shared. The session speakers will handle presentations of particular cases which implement the Blockchain technology, discussing potentialities and challenges that persist within the use of this tool. Meanwhile, the session moderator will lead diesucssions on several key questions to explore the insights from session speakers. Finally there will be the discussions on opportunity and challenges. How does the industrial people, technical community and government to work together to improve this technology and which mechanism will be adopted to enhance the communication.  A discussion with the audience will be held during the session.

Collaborative NRIs:

1. Armenia IGF
2. Brazil IGF
3. China IGF 
4. Nigeria IGF

Speakers/Resource persons

Mr. Arvin Kemberi, Diplo Foundation
Ms. Nathalia Sautchuk Patricio, Brazil IGF
Mr. Olutoyin Justus Oloniteru, CEO Digital Extra Limited, Founder of Spindiar Cyberlaw Centre
Mr. Patric DAI, Qtum Foundation Chair
Mr. Satish Babu, APRALO Chair
Ms. Tian Luo, China IGF
Mr. Walid Al-Saqaf, Member, Internet Society Board of Trustees
Mr. Olutoyin Oloniteru, Nigeria IGF

Session format and timing

Round table,  90 minutes long.

Relevance of the issue
A blockchain is a distributed database that maintains a continuously growing list of ordered records. By design, blockchains are inherently resistant to changes in the data; once recorded, the data in a block cannot be altered retroactively. The blockchain is actually a way to structure data. It is usually associated with the foundation of cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin and Ethereum. Despite this more usual implementation blockchain can be also applied to several other situations where it is necessary to keep an ownership history for information and interactions. It has the potential for many other uses, for example, helping to develop more transparent and distributed social and economic structures. The session is quite relevant to shed light on the debate of all these uses of the blockchain technology. Among several different alternative uses for the blockchain technologies, we can highlight some: a proof of concept in which blockchain is used to track artwork objects as well as loan processes between museums; the Massachusetts Institute of Technology created a proof of concept to make available course completion certificates, enabling the authenticity inspection of them without the need of nominated authorities; United Arab Emirates proposed a solution to track diamond’s origins with the use of blockchain technologies; a commercial solution for the use of Internet of Things equipment along with blockchain systems so as to improve trustworthiness in any sort of transaction; and there’s also an ongoing debate prospecting possible uses of blockchain as a replacement for Digital Rights Management (DRM) technologies. 

Onsite moderator(s)
Representatives from: Dr. Yuri Grin
Dr. Grin will also share the info about ITU blockchain focus group.
 
Online moderator(s)
Online moderator: Armenia IGF
Online participation and interaction will rely on the WebEx platform. Those joining the session using WebEx (either invited members of the Panel or the general audience) will be granted the floor in the discussion segment of the workshop. People in charge of moderation will strive to entertain onsite and remote participation indiscriminately. One idea is to inscribe everybody (onsite and online participants) in a single queue and project it onto the screen. Social media (twitter) will also be employed by the online moderators who will be in charge of browsing social media using some hashtags (to be defined). 

Rapporteur(s)
China IGF, Nigeria IGF, Armenia IGF, Brazil IGF

Online participation logistics
Online participants will be treated equally as the onsite, and the online moderator will post guiding questions to have them engaged.

Discussion facilitation
The discussion will be facilitated by the onsite moderators who will guide the debate and comments session in the end.
Audience members (onsite and online participants) will inscribe in a single queue that will be projected onto the screen to facilitate the speech organization. Onsite moderator will call each one in order to speak and the online moderator in the case of remote participants. 


Session Organizers

Tuesday December 19, 2017 15:00 - 16:30
Room XI - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

15:00

EMPOWERING GLOBAL COOPERATION ON CYBERSECURITY FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT & PEACE
Hi, thanks for indicating interest in our main session. 

Since the inception of the Internet Governance Forum (IGF), Cybersecurity has been one of the key areas of concerns and discussions, with the Internet community stakeholders expressing grave concerns about the future of the Internet, its value for development, peace and preservation of our mutual interests in the cyberspace. The global economic and development agenda as enshrined in the resolution adopted by the General Assembly of the United Nations in 2015, Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable development, continue to be under a serious threat from being achieved if the global actors decline to shape into global actions commitments and ideas on global cooperation on cybersecurity and preservation of the stability of the Internet.

The existence of critical global cybersecurity issues have underscored the urgent need for a renewed multi-stakeholder dialogue on the security of cyberspace for peace and sustainable development. However, there have been various institutional frameworks for dealing with cooperation on cybersecurity, which are operating in silos, and are yet to be translated into a meaningful global course of action.

It is expected that the IGF main session on cybersecurity would contribute to a global multistakeholders dialogue stream that empowers Global Cooperation on Cybersecurity for Sustainable Development & Peace. Furthermore, the session would build upon the previous efforts and outcome IGF 2015 and 2016 main session on cybersecurity.

For details on the highlights and list of confirmed speakers, please visit https://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/index.php?q=filedepot_download/5077/722.

Session Organisers:

Olusegun Hamed Olugbile
Member, UN-IGF Multistakeholder Advisory Group (MAG) CEO, Continental Project Affairs Associates & Member of Nigeria Cybercrime Advisory Council, Nigeria olugbileoh@cybersecurity.gov.ng solugbile@gmail.com.

Juan Alfonso Fernández González
Member, UN-IGF Multistakeholder Advisory Group (MAG) Advisor, Ministry of Communications, Cuba
juan.fernandez@mincom.gob.cu juan.fdz.glz@gmail.com

With the Support from;
Markus Kummer - BPF Cybsercurity ( kummer.markus@gmail.com)
Maarten Van Horenbeeck - BPF Cybersecurity  (maarten@first.org)
Eleonora Anna Mazzucchi  - IGF Secretariat

Session Organizers
avatar for Segun Olugbile

Segun Olugbile

CEO, Continental Project Affairs Associates
My work focused on solutions and strategic policy advisory to issues on cybersecurity, Internet governance and e-development. My work is aimed at shaping policy-making, by engaging with stakeholders globally and raising awareness on the decisive role of technology, through participation... Read More →


Tuesday December 19, 2017 15:00 - 18:00
Main Hall - Room XVII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

15:05

16:10

“ICANN – Looking ahead: - Challenges and Opportunities” (OF50)
This Open and Interactive Session will consider a range of areas ICANN is addressing including ongoing accountability work; the work of the Community in preparing for a potential new application process for gTLDs; the on-going work with respect to emerging Data Protection (DP) and privacy developments including the implementation of new DP legislation in Europe (GDPR).
 
It will also briefly consider challenges posed to ICANN, and opportunities afforded, by the external environment ICANN works in; not least with respect to discussions in the UN (CSTD) on “Enhanced Cooperation”.  
 
The Forum will also be an opportunity for some technical updates related to the Key Rollover Programme (which will have taken place) KSK and other DNS Security, Resilience and Reliability issues. 

The Forum will allow plenty of time for comment, discussion and interaction on these and other subjects delegates may want to discuss. 
Tag 1: Domain Name System
Tag 2: Data protection
Tag 3:
Name(s) of Speaker(s):
 
They will include the President and CEO of ICANN, Goran Marby, the newly elected Chair of the ICANN Board, ICANN Organisation Executive Members as well as some ICANN Community leaders.  

Name of Online Moderator: Nigel Hickson
Background Paper: background_paper_on_open_forum.pdf
Past IGF Participation: Yes
Report Link: http://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/documents?cid=28&fid=307
Name: Mr. Nigel Hickson
Organizational Affiliation: ICANN


Session Organizers
NH

Nigel Hickson

VP; IGO Engagement, ICANN
ICANN or cricket


Tuesday December 19, 2017 16:10 - 17:10
Room XXI - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

16:10

Tackling violent extremism online: new human rights challenges for states and businesses (OF80)

The scale and complexity of terrorism has evolved, as shown by the growth in the reach of terrorists and terrorist organisations and the changes in their modus operandi. Internet-based communications are widely used by terrorist organisations to incite violence, find new recruits, and coordinate their activities. While the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (Da’esh) has attracted global attention in this regard, there are also concerns about how other terrorist and violent extremist groups with various ideological backgrounds use the internet to incite hatred, discrimination, violence and terrorism.

Societies face serious challenges in trying to respond to these threats. In their responses, some States have adopted pervasive measures including through surveillance and interception of communications; the collection, retention and analysis of data; and the blocking and filtering of information, often on a widespread scale. The private sector also plays a key role in these activities, and States increasingly are requesting ICT businesses to take measures such as blocking, filtering or removing content, denial of services, and collecting and retaining personal data of Internet users. Internet companies, partly in response to such calls for action, increasingly appear to intensify their efforts to combat “extremist” messages, often in cooperation with States agencies, such as Internet Referral Units.

It is crucial that any measures to prevent and counter violent extremism online are taken in full compliance with international human rights law, in particular the rights to freedom of opinion and expression, privacy, and freedom of religion or belief. Such measures also must not undermine the enormous potential the Internet has to foster democratic participation in public life, stimulate debate on issues of public importance and enhance development. However, the interplay and at times cooperation and collaboration of States and business enterprises in responding jointly to extremism online is often problematic due, for example, to poorly defined legal concepts (such as “extremism” or “national security”), insufficient oversight and lack of transparency and accountability. The session will focus on a sharing of experiences and initiatives to prevent violent extremism online, with a view to addressing some of the human rights challenges and recommendations for ways to move forward.


Tag 1: Human Rights
Tag 2: Freedom of Expression
Tag 3: Privacy
Name(s) of Speaker(s):

Kate Gilmore, OHCHR, UN Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights (moderator)

David Kaye, UN Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression

Fiona Asonga, CEO, Technology Service Providers Association of Kenya, Kenya

Brett Solomon, Access Now, Executive Director, Australia

Chinmayi Arun, National Law University Delhi, Centre for Communication Governance, Executive Director, India

Alexandria Walden, Public Policy and Government Relations Counsel, Google

Name of Online Moderator: TBD
Background Paper:
Past IGF Participation: Yes
Report Link:
Name: Mr. Tim Engelhardt
Organizational Affiliation: Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights
 

 


Session Organizers
TE

Tim Engelhardt

OHCHR (UN Human Rights)


Tuesday December 19, 2017 16:10 - 17:10
Room XXV - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

16:10

Fostering Internet Usage in Afghanistan via Regulatory Measures (OF61)
Afghanistan is a developing country in Central Asia with unique characteristics that pose particular challenges for the development of Internet usage. The country has been occupied by international forces throughout its history and remains a conflict zone nowadays. The efforts that the Afghanistan Telecommunications Regulatory Authority (ATRA) is making in promoting the use of Internet in the country range from assuring via regulatory actions that the service providers will have sufficient resources to advance broadband deployment, through the use of Universal Service Access Funds to assure the provision of Internet access in remote areas. A key milestone was the approval of the Open Access Policy in September 2016, which requires several regulatory measures for its full implementation to secure the Internet & ICTs for the Sustainable Development Goals. The experience gained by ATRA in the implementation of the Open Access policy, particularly in the last year with regard to Multistakeholder Cooperation, is what we propose for the Open Forum. We feel that a fruitful discussion could be generated not just by analyzing the present situation and the measures taken, but also a consideration of the future steps in the regulatory arena which will pave the way for increase of Internet accessibility in the country. The experience gained in this area could also be shared with other countries experiencing problems derived from internal conflicts when dealing with the Internet Economy.
Tag 1: Multistakeholder Cooperation
Tag 2:
Tag 3:
Name(s) of Speaker(s):
Mohammad N. Azizi, Ph.D., Chairman, Afghanistan Telecom Regulatory Authority (ATRA)
Omar Mansoor Ansari, President, TechNation
Eng. Naqibullah Sailab, Vice Chairman, Afghanistan Telecom Regulatory Authority (ATRA)
Ata M. Yari, Advisor, Afghanistan Telecom Regulatory Authority (ATRA)

Name of Online Moderator: Mohammad N. Azizi, Ph.D.
Background Paper: background_paper.pdf
Past IGF Participation: No
Report Link:
Name: Mr. Rene Bustillo
Organizational Affiliation: Afghanistan Telecommunications Regulatory Authority (ATRA)
 

Session Organizers

Tuesday December 19, 2017 16:10 - 17:10
Room XII - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

16:10

Is there a place for civility in our digital future? (WS99)

Proposer's Name: Mr. Nicholas Carlisle
Proposer's Organization: No Bully
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Clara Sommarin
Co-Proposer's Organization: UNICEF
Co-Organizers:
Mr, Nicholas, Carlisle, Civil Society, No Bully
Ms, Clara, Sommarin, Intergovernmental Organization, UNICEF


Session Format: Other - 90 Min
Format description: Fishbowl

Proposer:
Country: United States
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Co-Proposer:
Country: United States
Stakeholder Group: Intergovernmental Organizations

Speaker: Nicholas Carlisle
Speaker: Clara Sommarin
Speaker: Christopher Castle
Speaker: Jacqueline Beauchere
Speaker: Ki Chun, David NG

Content of the Session:
Were you “unfriended” on Facebook because you expressed a viewpoint that did not sit well with others? Were you so put off by the words and actions of a colleague that you “unfollowed” them on Twitter? Has the level of discourse online stooped to such new lows that you found yourself loosing trust in others, stressed out or even not sleeping? If you answered “yes” to any of these, take some comfort - you are not alone.

New preliminary research indicates that 65% of people around the world, including teens, have suffered some sort of negative experience online, which has led them to be less trusting of others both online and off. A full report on the state of digital civility, personal online safety and digital interactions was made available on International Safer Internet Day 2017, and follow-on research from the originally surveyed countries as well as several more will be available for the IGF.

In keeping with this theme, there is a growing movement across the globe to restore the original promise of the Internet of connectivity and a common space for all. In 2017 UNESCO, Facebook, and No Bully launched a global campaign to combat cyberbullying that is bringing together technology companies, the private sector, civil society organizations, educators, and youth to achieve collaborative impact on one of the biggest issues facing children and teens online. UNICEF has been working on its own research on online bullying and online child sexual exploitation and abuse, and will reference these education and awareness-raising campaigns.

Goals of this Fishbowl
• Get out of our own Fishbowl and listen to others
• Deepen the understanding of the impediments to online civility
• Generate strategies to activate the big switches that can reduce online bullying and hate speech among youth
• Share knowledge and feedback on existing initiatives and address what is not working
• Raise awareness among key influencers about what is increasingly being perceived as a problem.

Above all else – we want this to be a highly interactive session where the audience drives the conversation. We’re here to listen and learn, not drive. If you want to be a wall flower in this session, watch out. You might be called on …


Relevance of the Session:
This workshop is directly related to the IGF 2017 theme as it explores a set of issues that, if not addressed, could discourage existing and new internet users from fully utilizing it. As mentioned earlier, the original promise of the Internet was connectivity and a common space for all. Without addressing the issues of bullying and exploitation online, that promise is threatened. In a worst-case scenario, there will be a reduced or even no digital future for many.

Tag 1: Digital Literacy
Tag 2: Youth Engagement
Tag 3: Global Citizenship

Interventions:
Our “Speakers” will serve more as discussants and help with audience engagement. After reviewing some of the research in this area, the speakers will share brief perspectives on the topic of digital civility and bullying. But the the key role for our speakers will be to engage with the audience and bring them into the discussion. We expect a wide diversity of views from the audience participants to make this a valuable session.

Diversity:
The nature of our session, a highly interactive discussion with the audience (as opposed to talking at the audience), lends itself to an extremely diverse session. While we have a small handful of speakers listed in the proposal from various stakholder groups and regions, their role is quite limited. Their aim is to provide a variety of brief perspectives – from IGO and civil society to private sector and youth and to help engage the audience/participants in discussions and exchanges. Due to the relevance of this topic to the theme of the IGF and the global concern about civility online, we expect participation from across the multistakeholder community. Our experience shows that this topic is particularly suited to audience participation because everyone, regardless of where you are from or what stakeholder group you represent, is impacted and interested in advancing digital civility.

Please note that one of our discussion facilitators, David Ng, is a placeholder for a Youth Ambassador from NetMission in Hong Kong. Those have not been selected yet.

Onsite Moderator: Jim Prendergast
Online Moderator: Berry Cobb
Rapporteur: Jim Prendergast

Online Participation:
Through the various networks of each of the participating organizations, we will publicize the session in advance to generate awareness in the community of those who are working in this area but are not able to make the trip to Geneva. Our moderator will coordinate closely with the remote moderator to ensure that remote participants are given ample opportunity to offer comments, ask questions and make other interventions as we shape a truly global, multi-stakeholder dialogue.

We will also conduct advanced outreach to the remote hub coordinators to ensure they are aware of our session and have a copy of any materials.


Discussion facilitation:
Aside from a brief overview of some research there will be no speeches, presentations or other dais-led discussions. Again, our “speakers” will act more as discussion facilitators and will engage the audience to make them a part of the conversation. In fact – we don’t really want an audience – we want a room full of participants.

Organizers will develop a list of thought-provoking questions to spur conversation. In addition, we will closely work with the remote moderator to ensure online participants are afforded equal opportunity to participate.

Ideally, the room would allow for re-arranging of the furniture to make it a big circle to better foster interaction and participation – as if one were sitting around a campfire.

Proposed Agenda
Welcome and Overview - 2 minutes Moderator
Overview of the Research – 8 minutes
Reaction from Discussion Facilitators - 10 minutes
Open discussion among audience participants facilitated by Moderator and Discussion Facilitators- 60 minutes
Summarize outcomes and next steps – 10 minutes


Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: No
Link to Report: 

Additional Speakers: 

Tommaso Waybe Bertolotti

Tommaso Wayne Bertolotti is a philosopher of technology. He earned his PhD at the University of Pavia, in Italy, where he is adjunct professor of cognitive philosophy. His research focuses on the ethical and cognitive impact of Internet technologies, especially as it concerns social cognition and other cultural and biologically inherited aspects of human life. He lives in Paris where he collaborates with the French engineering school Telecom ParisTech. Since Spring 2017 he inaugurated his own brand of philosophical consulting, MonPhilosophe, to leverage the importance of philosophy in addressing everyday challenges.

Agenda: 

Welcome and Overview - 2 minutes Moderator
Overview of the Research – 8 minutes
Reaction from Discussion Facilitators - 10 minutes
Open discussion among audience participants facilitated by Moderator and Discussion Facilitators- 60 minutes
Summarize outcomes and next steps – 10 minutes

...

Session Organizers

Tuesday December 19, 2017 16:10 - 17:40
Room XXIII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

16:40

The Role of Internet Governance Content in Shaping our Digital Futures (WS168)

Diversity in the Internet’s multistakeholder model: the role of Capacity Building and multilingual Internet Governance Content in promoting an Inclusive Internet

Proposer's Name: Ms. DALILA RAHMOUNI and Ms Olga Cavalli
Proposer's Organization: French Ministry of Foreign Affairs and South School on Internet Governance

Co-Proposer's Name: Mr. Dustin Phillips
Co-Proposer's Organization: ICANNWIKI

Co-Organizers:
Ms., Dalila RAHMOUNI, Government, French Ministry of Foreign Affairs Mr., Emmanuel ADJOVI, International Organization, International Organization of La Francophonie

Dustin Phillips - Civil Society – ICANNWiki

Adrián Carballo - Civil Society - CCAT LAT Centro de Capacitación para América Latina y el Caribe

Julio César Vega Gómez - Private Sector - Asociación de Internet MX

Session Format: Debate - 90 Min

Speakers
Speaker: Emmanuel ADJOVI
Speaker: Charly Berthet - French Digital Coucil

Speaker: Lucena Claudio
Speaker: Garcia Van Hoogstraten Caterine 
Speaker: Witaba Bonface
Speaker: Jennifer Chung

Session Format: Debate - 90 Min

Content of the Session:
In 1990, 75% of the Internet users lived in developed countries. Today, more than 66% of Internet users live in developing countries. In 2030, an overwhelming majority of users will access the Internet from Asia, Africa and Latin America.

With multistakeholder processes and a global set of actors, Internet governance (IG) is often viewed as an inclusive ecosystem. It’s true that the IG community has made progress in becoming more inclusive in recent years, but there is still a lot of work to be done to give everybody a voice in shaping their digital futures. This panel will examine this task through the lens of Internet governance content.

WSIS+10 Outcome Document recognizes that there is a digital divide among developed and developing countries, with a primary dimension being content accessibility.The approach to closing the digital divide must be multidimensional, looking beyond mere connectivity to understand the quality of access to linguistically relevant and localized content. The creation of high quality, multilingual Internet Governance content is one way to help developing countries and the Internet community at large understand the complexity of Internet services and addressing the challenges of regulations, cybersecurity and other technological developments that directly shape their everyday lives.

Promoting an inclusive Internet governance ecosystem is essential to the future of the globally connected Internet. If strides aren’t made toward closing the digital divide and people don’t have a voice in shaping the very resource that shapes their lives dramatically, there will be negative effects for the Internet as a whole.

The debate will be opened under these general ideas:
How inclusive is Internet governance?

How can the different stakeholders contribute to the Internet governance model?
What risks do we face if Internet governance fails to be a truly inclusive ecosystem?
What role does Internet governance content play?
How can we improve Internet governance content?
How can this content be created considering the multilingualism?
How can we go beyond multilingual content to localized content?
What are the challenges related with different scripts? Have IDNs helped?

Relevance of the Session:
In 1990, 75% of the Internet users lived in developed countries. Today, more than 66% of Internet users live in developing countries. In 2030, an overwhelming majority of users will access the Internet from Asia, Africa and Latin America.

The future of the Internet Governance depends on the capacity of the Internet community to be representative of the diversity of world in terms of stakeholders, culture, language, regional representation and gender inclusion.

Tag 1: Access and Diversity
Tag 2: Internet Governance and the role of the different stakeholders
Tag 3: Multilingualism and Local Content

 

 


Session Organizers
avatar for Olga Cavalli

Olga Cavalli

Academic Director, South School on Internet Governance
ISOC Board of Trustees Member President ISOC Argentina chapter Former MAG Member - Advisor Committee to the United Nations Secretary General - IGF GAC Vicechair - ICANN - Argentina Representative Academic Director SSIG - South School on Internet Governance Academic Director - Dominios... Read More →


Tuesday December 19, 2017 16:40 - 18:10
Room IX - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

16:40

Realizing SDGs through Policies Enabling Digital Trade (WS14)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Barbara WANNER
Proposer's Organization: U.S. Council for International Business
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Karen MCCABE
Co-Proposer's Organization: IEEE
Co-Organizers:
Ms. Karen McCabe, Technical Community, IEEE
Ms. Christine Arida, Government, National Telecom Regulatory Authority, Government of Egypt


Session Format: Round Table - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: United States
Stakeholder Group: Private Sector

Co-Proposer:
Country: United States
Stakeholder Group: Technical Community

Speaker: Hosuk Lee-Makiyama
Speaker: Christopher Wilson
Speaker: Hossam ElGamal
Speaker: Audrey Plonk
Speaker: Christopher Yoo
Speaker: Makoto Yokozawa
Speaker: Rachel Bae
Speaker: Ellen Blackler
Speaker: Esther Peh
Speaker: Helani Galpaya
Speaker: Karen McCabe Karen McCabe
Speaker: Carolyn Nguyen

Content of the Session:
The Internet-enabled transformation to the global economy has advanced cross-sectoral development, commercial opportunities for small businesses in developing countries, innovation, exchange of knowledge and opinions, and greater societal inclusion. The power of ICTs and digital innovations have the potential to help realize many of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in the coming decade if they can be effectively utilized.

This promise depends on stakeholder opportunities to invest and compete, sufficient infrastructure, and cross-border flows of data and information. These essential elements have been challenged by some government measures that aim to promote domestic industry, innovation, and/or privacy and security, but have the potential to limit growth of the digital economy –acting as barriers to the use of the Internet and ICTs to advance global development. A key task with respect to Internet governance, therefore is to identify policies that enable digital trade to serve as an engine for realizing the SDGs and societal inclusion goals.

Trade stakeholders should draw upon expertise in the Internet governance community to map and understand these potential enablers and barriers to digital trade. Internet governance stakeholders, for their part, should engage in constructive dialogue with the trade community to discuss how trade policy might be deployed to address Internet barriers. An important complement is to build user trust in the online environment through interoperable privacy and security frameworks aimed at optimizing the benefits of digital trade. In addition, business acknowledges a responsibility to channel its digital innovative advancements and trade-related benefits into initiatives aimed at bridging global development gaps.

Speakers will address the following agenda:

1. The Evidence Base: What research tells us about the economic developmental benefits of digital trade

2. Digital Trade Rules: Instruments for economic development and societal inclusion

3. Localization Rules: Impact on Realizing the SDGs

4. Fostering Users’ Trust in the Digital Economy: Addressing privacy/security concerns while optimizing digital trade benefits

5. Business Responsibility: Channeling trade benefits to education and economic opportunities

6. Best Practices in Internet Governance: Making the connection between Internet governance and digital trade to realize sustainable development and societal inclusion


Relevance of the Session:
This workshop will be directly related to the 2017 IGF theme as it will enable representatives from all stakeholder groups and diverse regions to explore how to “shape their digital futures” by finding the appropriate policy balance that leads to greater economic prosperity through digital trade but also ensures a trusted and open Internet environment that fosters social inclusion and societal benefits.

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development reflects a growing understanding that ICTs, the spread of global inter-connectedness, and an open Internet have great potential to enable economic development and new forms of cross-border commercial activities that will bridge the digital divide and expand societal inclusion.

The WSIS+10 Outcome Document echoes this theme, noting that ICTs have increased the efficiency and ingenuity of all sectors, and that cross-border flows of digital information and technologies have proved critical to realizing breakthroughs in business, agriculture and science.

Workshop speakers will examine how a constructive approach to digital trade and effective use of ICTs will serve as an engine for realizing many of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and expanding societal inclusion.


Tag 1: Internet & ICTs for the Sustainable Development Goals
Tag 2: Digital Trade
Tag 3: Data Localization

Interventions:
Speakers have been selected to ensure both a diversity of stakeholder groups as well as different regional perspectives. Also important, the speakers will bring rich substantive backgrounds in international trade, ICTs as enablers of trade and economic growth, global technical standards, and privacy and security frameworks.
1. Rachael Bae, OECD (IGO-France), and Hosuk Lee-Makiyama, ECIPE (civil society-Belgium), will provide IGO and civil society perspectives on what research tells us about the economic and developmental benefits of digital trade

2. Hossam ElGamal, Government of Egypt (Africa group), Esther Peh, Mission of Singapore to the WTO (government-Asia Pacific ), Prof. Makoto Yokozawa, Kyoto University (civil society- Asia Pacific, Helani Galpaya, LIRNEasia (civil society-Sri Lanka), and Christopher Wilson, Amazon (private sector-USA) will offer points of view from Asia, Africa, and the USA about how digital trade rules may serve as important instruments for economic development and societal inclusion.

3. Karen McCabe, IEEE (technical community-USA), Helani Galpaya, LIRNEasia (civil society-Sri Lanka), Hossam ElGamal, Government of Egypt (Africa group), Rachel Bae, OECD (IGO-France), and Carolyn Nguyen, Microsoft, (private sector-USA) will provide both developed and emerging economy perspectives about how localization rules, often employed for privacy and security-related reasons -- and which range from mandates for certain technical standards to data storage and server requirements -- can have adverse and unintended consequences to economies and citizens alike creating very insecure conditions and discouraging investment, innovation, and growth.

4. Audrey Plonk, Intel (private sector-Europe), Prof. Christopher Yoo, University of Pennsylvania Law School (civil society-USA), and Prof. Makoto Yokozawa, Kyoto University (civil society-Asia Pacific) will offer diverse perspectives on policy approaches that address security and privacy concerns while optimizing the benefits of digital trade.

5. Chris Wilson, Amazon (private sector-USA), Karen McCabe, IEEE (technical community-USA), Carolyn Nguyen, Microsoft (private sector-USA), and Ellen Blackler (private sector-USA), will propose some new approaches to corporate social responsibility, which recognizes the importance of channeling the benefits of digital trade into new educational and employment opportunities to enable ever-larger shares of the work force to become active participants in the Internet economy.

6. All of the speakers will provide diverse stakeholder and regional perspectives on best practices in Internet Governance that will enable digital trade to serve as an engine for realize the SDGs and societal inclusion. 

Diversity:
Each stakeholder group is represented in the roster of confirmed speakers -- private sector, government, civil society, technical community, and IGO. We also have sought to ensure diverse regional representation, drawing speakers from the African region, Asia Pacific region, Europe, South Asia, and the United States.

Co-Organizers not only come from three stakeholder groups -- private sector, technical community, and government -- but also reflect perspectives of the USA and a member of the African regional group. In addition, all three co-organizers are female, demonstrating gender balance.

Among the speakers, online moderator, and substantive rapporteur, there also is abundant evidence of gender balance and regional diversity. Two of the female speakers are from the Asia Pacific and South Asia; the online moderator is a promising young ICT professional from South Asia.

First-time IGF session speakers include: Rachel Bae, OECD (IGO, WEOG); and Esther Peh, Government of Singapore (government, Asia Pacific). 

Onsite Moderator: Mr. Eric Loeb, AT&T
Online Moderator: Ms. Sharada Srinivasan, University of Pennsylvania Law School
Rapporteur: Ms. Judith Hellerstein, Hellerstein Associates

Online Participation:
The pre-IGF preparatory process will entail reaching out to and confirming the participation of remote discussants, particularly from emerging economies, who the Moderator will invite to offer comments or pose questions via the Remote Moderator following each agenda topic. In addition, the co-organizers will explore with Roundtable participants the potential for establishing remote participation hubs, particularly in emerging economies, delving into technical capabilities and needs that could be addressed by the bus

...

Session Organizers
avatar for Barbara Wanner

Barbara Wanner

Vice President, ICT Policy, U.S. Council for International Business
Barbara Wanner has more than 25 years of professional experience dealing with ICT policy, international trade, and foreign policy issues in both the public and private sectors. | | She currently serves as Vice President for ICT Policy at the US Council for International Business... Read More →


Tuesday December 19, 2017 16:40 - 18:10
Room XXVI - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

16:40

Achieving the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda in a Digital Future: Where Do Youth Stand? (WS90)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Khouloud Dawahi
Proposer's Organization: UN Major Group for Children and Youth
Co-Proposer's Name: Mr. Donovan Guttieres
Co-Proposer's Organization: UN Major Group for Children and Youth
Co-Organizers:
1. Mr. Donovan Guttieres, Civil Society, United Nations Major Group for Children and Youth (UN MGCY)
2. Ms. Khouloud Dawahi, Civil society,UN Major Group for Youth and Children 

Session Format: Panel - 90 Min
Format description: The session will start by setting the scene and outlining the purpose and objectives of the session. Speakers will then offer flash presentations reflecting on the work undergone by their respective organizations while sharing best practices, lesson learned, recommendations, and emerging trends with the audience. These brief presentations will set the stage for an interactive, moderated discussion between the speakers of the panel and the audience, followed by questions and answers, and a conclusion.

Proposer:
Country: Tunisia
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Co-Proposer:
Country: United Kingdom
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speaker: khouloud Dawahi 
Speaker: Donovan Guttieres
Speaker: Sharada Srinivasan
Speaker: Michael Joseph Oghia

Content of the Session:
This workshop will take the form of an interactive, intergenerational discussion to leverage the expertise and research experiences of the diverse organizations taking part in the session. The focus of the discussion will be at the intersection of ICTs, policy, youth, and sustainable development. It will highlight the ways in which ICTs can be used to share knowledge, promote citizen-based reporting on the SDGs, build capacity, and enable access to tools for implementing the SDGs. Enhancing digital literacy is especially important to leverage the potential benefits that come from ICTs. It will further highlight the importance of engaging youth in decision-making processes surrounding ICTs, allowing them to deliberate and share perspectives on the intersection of ICTs, policy, society, and governance. For example, youth are actively engaged in conducting impact assessments on the social, environmental, and economic dimensions of ICTs, including its design, development, deployment, scale, and appropriate and inclusive use. As pivotal catalysts in implementing the SDGs, engaging youth is crucial to mobilize long-lasting change.

During the workshop, the panelists will present examples of youth-led initiatives to enhance and democratize access to Internet and appropriate use of ICTs, as well as youth-led participatory technology assessments and foresight surrounding ICTs, and a range of other topics. Speakers come from diverse regions, backgrounds, and field of practice - which contribute to an engaging and fruitful dialogue. The panel will then discuss various topics at the intersection of ICTs, policy, and society, focusing on the role of youth using ICTs as a vehicle towards achieving the 2030 Agenda. The panel will give a chance for the presenters, along with other invited panelists, to discuss some of the questions highlighted below.

During the panel discussion with the audience both on site and remotely, the following questions will be addressed:

1. How can ICTs be used to enhance participation of youth towards the SDGs? (e.g. knowledge share, awareness raising, reporting)

2. How can ICTs be used as an enabler for youth to contribute to implementing the SDGs? (e.g. digital skills, ICT tools)

3. What avenues do youth have to formally engage in ICT-related discussions and decision making at the global, regional, and national level? What barriers do they face?

4. What are examples and best practices for democratizing access to ICT knowledge, building digital literacy, and ensuring appropriate use ICTs for sustainable livelihoods and community resilience?

5. How can youth in developing countries leverage the rapid rate of digitization, as well as different e-governance structures that give rise to unique patterns of innovation, in order to leapfrog into the digital economy?

6. How and in what ways do the generic properties of ‘digital creativity’ create different kinds of opportunity for decent jobs and movement across traditional work roles?

7. What is the importance of youth engaging in participatory technology assessments for ICTs? How can they meaningfully engage?

During the event, the UN Major Group for Children & Youth, as the formal General Assembly mandated space for meaningful youth participation in certain intergovernmental processes, will launch a youth-led, peer-review, publication comprised of crowdsourced policy briefs on the topics of digital technology, e-governance, and inclusivity for the 2030 Agenda. This will provide a space for inputs from youth from around the globe, reflecting the positions of youth on emerging issues, best practices, and lessons learned on this topic.

After the moderated panel discussion, the floor will be open for Q&A, from both participants present in the room and those online. The panel will close with recommendations on enhancing access to ICTs and ensuring an inclusive digital future for all.

Relevance of the Session:
Information and communication technologies (ICTs) have made it possible for more people to connect to the internet than ever before, with the number increasing each day. A 2014 report by the ITU on annual global ICT use highlights that more than 3 billion people are connected to the internet worldwide. In 2015, the percentage of the population living in areas covered by mobile broadband networks stood at 69 per cent globally. In rural areas, the share was only 29 per cent (Report of the Secretary-General on Progress towards the SDGs). While half the world continues to reap the benefits and make use of an increasingly digital and interconnected society, the other half is left behind. Addressing systemic gaps in reliable access to ICTs and bridging the digital divide is key to achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Target 9.c outlines the importance of investing in the requisite physical and digital infrastructure to provide universal and affordable access to the Internet, especially in least developed countries, by 2020. Target 17.8 further emphasizes the potential use of ICTs as a cross-cutting means-of-implementation throughout the 2030 Agenda. Initiatives such as the Technology Facilitation Mechanism, technology banks for LDCs, and other capacity building systems need to adequately address such barriers and enable both appropriate technology use and inclusive policy environments to stay true to the 2030 Agenda’s commitment of “leaving no one behind.”

Youth, defined as individuals between the ages of 13 and 35 by the Youth Coalition on Internet Governance (YCIG), are identified as the catalyst of change in the interconnected world. Comprising close to 50% of the global population, they are key partners in implementing the 2030 Agenda. They are perceived as early adopters of technology, especially ICTs, and able to adapt technology to suit their needs, Furthermore, they are drivers of technology development and innovation. Youth and ICTs are thus two of the main building blocks needed to achieve the 2030 Agenda, as well as the requisite resilience for a sustainable post-2030 digital future.

Tag 1: Internet & ICTs for the Sustainable Development Goals
Tag 2: Youth Engagement
Tag 3: Leaving No One Behind in the Digital Future

Interventions:
1. Ms. Katherine Townsend -World Bank /USAID- Global perspective
2. Khouloud Dawahi ,Civil Society ,United Nations Major Group for Children & Youth (UN MGCY) - Global perspective
3. Mr. Mark W. Datysgeld - Governance Primer Coalition - perspective from LAC
4. Ms. Sharada Srinivasan, Civil society CTIC Research Fellow, 1 World Connected, University of Pennsylvania of Law - Global perspective
5. Mr. Michael Oghia, Civil society, Youth Coalition on Internet Governance interim steering committee member - Eastern European perspective.
6. Ms. Chenai Chair, Technical society, Chair, Researcher & Communications/Evaluations Advisor, Research ICT Africa-African Perspective
7. Ms. Meicen Sun, Civil Society, PhD Student, Political Science Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology - Asian Perspective

Diversity:
The proposed speakers, are well informed about the key issues relating to youth engagement and Internet & ICTs for Sustainable Development since they are young experts working on youth-led initiatives in the field of sustainable development .They also represent different regional perspectives (American and Latin American, European, African, and Asian), different organizations working on ICTs for development and youth engagement (UN MGCY, Governance Primer Coalition, Centre for Youth Empowerment and Leadership, Research ICT Africa, Youth Coalition on Internet Governance, and more), and different stakeholders (Civil society ,Academia, and intergovernmental). Not to mention that the speakers represent both developing and developed countries. 

Onsite Moderator: Khouloud Dawahi - UN Major Group for Children and Youth 
Online Moderator: Arsène Tungali - The Youth Coalition on Internet Go

...

Session Organizers

Tuesday December 19, 2017 16:40 - 18:10
Room XXII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

16:40

Online freedom for all = No unfreedom for women How do we solve this equation? (WS152)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Ingrid Brudvig
Proposer's Organization: World Wide Web Foundation
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Nandini Chami
Co-Proposer's Organization: IT for Change 
Co-Organizers:
Ms, Ingrid, BRUDVIG, Civil Society, World Wide Web Foundation - Women’s Rights Online Network

Ms, Nandini ,CHAMI, Civil Society, IT for Change


Session Format: Break-out Group Discussions - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: South Africa
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Co-Proposer:
Country: India
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speaker: Nanjira Sambuli
Speaker: Nandini Chami
Speaker: Amalia Toledo
Speaker: Lisa Garcia
Speaker: Amel Fahmy

Content of the Session:
The pandemic of technology-mediated violence has emerged as a near-insurmountable barrier for women and girls across the world seeking to use the Internet to expand their life-choices. Governments, Internet companies, and women’s rights activists are united in the recognition that something needs to be done, and that too urgently, if the gender digital divides in access are to be bridged and women’s meaningful use of connectivity assured. But zeroing down on what exactly needs to be done to guarantee a gender-inclusive and safe online public sphere is extremely difficult – as any step in this direction forces us to examine limits to Internet speech and participation that can allow societies to thrive without penalising their women and girls. Online gender based violence combines misogyny, homophobia, racism and other prejudices, making the promise of freedoms online elusive for a large majority of users.

Sexism and its unholy variants are ever-present in multiple Internet based social interactions. Understanding these forms of violations is vital to know how best to balance the competing considerations of freedom of expression online and women’s right to freedom from violence, whether it be a legal measure against online VAW, a private complaint resolution mechanism managed by an Internet intermediary, or civil society-initiated campaigns and awareness programs.

Through an open house discussion using the Break-out Group Discussions format, this workshop seeks to bring together civil society organisations, representatives from social network and social media platforms, and government officials, to reflect upon good practices in this domain that they are familiar with, to address the following questions:

- In framing an effective response to technology-mediated violence against women, what should be the roles and responsibilities of governments, Internet intermediary platforms and civil society organisations, so that freedoms are maximised and un-freedoms eliminated?

- What should be the framework and remit of the law and the mechanisms for effective law enforcement?

- How should intermediary responsibility get operationalised?

- What can civil society organisations do to create online cultures that are gender-inclusive and safe?


Relevance of the Session:
An inclusive digital future is one that respects, protects and promotes women’s human rights. As Dubraka Simonovic, the UN Special Rapporteur on violence against women has observed, building an Internet free from gender-based violence has become an essential precondition for ensuring women’s full participation in all spheres of life. In realising this objective, it is becoming clear that concerted actions from governments, Internet intermediary platforms, and civil society organisations -- in their respective roles and responsibilities -- is indispensable. Too often, conversations in this area tend to become one-sided -- privileging either a regulatory response or one that is steeped in an ethic of self-governance. This workshop seeks to tide over this impasse, by re-opening the discussion on the balance between considerations of free speech and freedom from violence that we seek to achieve on the Internet, in a way that enables all stakeholders to express their viewpoints. The future of Internet governance also depends on the extent to which we are successful in creating spaces for meaningful multistakeholder dialogue and debate -- and the workshop process intends to demonstrate one way of ensuring this.


Tag 1: Gender Issues
Tag 2: Freedom of Expression Online
Tag 3: Inclusive Digital Futures

Interventions:
Since we are organising the workshop as a Break-out Group Discussion, the speakers will make trigger presentations of 3-4 minutes each, which will help in catalysing small group discussions on the following three questions:

- What should be the framework and remit of the law and robust mechanisms for law enforcement?
- How should intermediary responsibility get operationalised?
- What can civil society organisations do to create online cultures that are gender-inclusive and safe?

Amalia Toledo, Amel Fahmy and Lisa Garcia, will draw upon their expertise of working on freedom from violence issues in Colombia, Egypt and Philippines, respectively, to highlight key issues/concerns around building online cultures that are gender-inclusive and safe. Nanjira Sambuli will reflect upon key issues/concerns in terms of operationalising intermediary liability and Nandini Chami will discuss emerging insights with respect to defining the framework and remit of the law on online gender-based violence and fixing gaps in law enforcement, drawing upon IT for Change’s research in this area.


Diversity:
This workshop reflects women’s leadership in the ICT policy space, as all speakers are women. Speakers are representative of at least 5 developing countries and diverse regions, including Kenya, India, Colombia, Philippines, South Africa and Egypt. Several speakers have attended IGF previously, but at least three are first-time session speakers at the IGF.


Onsite Moderator: Ingrid Brudvig - Women’s Rights Research and Advocacy Coordinator, World Wide Web Foundation 
Online Moderator: Ingrid Brudvig - Women’s Rights Research and Advocacy Coordinator, World Wide Web Foundation 
Rapporteur: We will select a rapporteur from each of the three break out groups. The session moderator, Ingrid Brudvig, will then collate an

Online Participation:
We will facilitate remote participation via the moderator in the room to manage online participation via WebEx (or similar tool). This will be open to the public (participants will have to pre-register) and will allow participants to ask questions and make comments using live audio/video during the session. Remote participants will be able to listen to the introductory trigger presentations and add their comments/questions to relevant Break Out groups. During the Break Out sessions the remote moderator will rotate to each of the groups and communicate the main discussion points with the remote participants for their reactions. We will also encourage remote participation via social media with appropriate hashtags including #womensrightsonline. This facility will be promoted throughout the Web Foundation’s global and local networks in the months leading up to the IGF in December.


Discussion facilitation:
The workshop will open with an introduction by the moderator, Ingrid Brudvig followed by trigger presentations from the speakers, as detailed above. Attendees will then self-organise into three groups, each of which will examine one out of the three key questions of the workshop:

- What should be the framework and remit of the law and robust mechanisms for law enforcement?
- How should intermediary responsibility get operationalised?
- What can civil society organisations do to create online cultures that are gender-inclusive and safe?

After 30 minutes of working on the overarching question, one representative from each group will report back to the plenary -- emerging best practices and continuing challenges that need attention -- in relation to the area they focused upon.

Remote participants will be able to react to the introductory trigger presentations. The remote moderator will also sit in each of the break away groups for 10 minutes each to capture the main discussion points and share this with remote participants.

Following the Break Out sessions the moderator will then respond to the group presentations and summarise the key insights they provide, to the larger question of what should be the roles and responsibilities of governments, Internet intermediary platforms and civil society organisations, specifically, in the context of responding to online GBV in a manner that maximises freedoms, and eliminates un-freedoms. Reactions from remote participants will also be shared.


Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: Yes
Link to Report: https://www.intgovforum.org/cms/documents/igf-meeting/igf-2014-istanbul/open-forums-1/285-report-web-foundation-open-forum-igf-2014/file

Agenda: 
  • Welcome and Introductions: 10 minutes
  • Trigger Presentations (Amalia Toledo, Amel Fahmy, Lisa Garcia, Nanjira Sambuli, Nandini Chami): 25 minutes
  • Breakout groups: 30 minutes
  • Group 1: What should be the framework and remit of the law and robust mechanisms for law enforcement?
  • Group 2: How should intermediary responsibility get operationalised?
  • Group 3: What can civil society organisations do to create online cultures that are gender-inclusive
...

Session Organizers
avatar for Ingrid Brudvig

Ingrid Brudvig

Women's Rights Research and Advocacy Coordinator, World Wide Web Foundation
Ingrid coordinates the Women’s Rights Online country partner network and research initiatives. Prior to joining the Web Foundation in 2014, Ingrid coordinated a network of anthropologists across Africa conducting ethnographic research on ICTs, and co-edited a published book on “Mobilities... Read More →


Tuesday December 19, 2017 16:40 - 18:10
Room XXIV - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

16:40

Fighting Fake News, Protecting Free Speech: Global Perspectives on Combatting Online Misinformation (WS197)

Proposer's Name: Mr. James Tager
Proposer's Organization: PEN America
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Katy Glenn Bass
Co-Proposer's Organization: PEN America


Session Format: Round Table - 90 Min

Speaker: Yehven Fedchenko
Speaker: Ashif Rabi
Speaker: James Tager
Speaker: Dunja Mijatovic
Speaker: Andreas Vlachos
Speaker: Rasha Abdulla
Speaker: Paolo Cesarini

Workshop Overview

The rise of “fake news”—which is primarily spread on the internet through the sharing of online articles and chain e-letters, and posts on social media platforms—has given rise to widespread concern about its negative societal impact, including influencing elections, undermining public faith in institutions, and eroding support for democratic principles. In response, governments and technology companies around the world are working quickly to curb its spread. However, some of the approaches being advanced have the potential to restrict free speech online, limit legitimate civic debate, and damage press freedom. As this ongoing debate continues, how do we ensure that efforts to combat fake news do not unduly burden free expression online?

AGENDA

1. Introduction and Moderating Remarks, James Tager (5-10 Minutes)

2. Opening Panelist Remarks (8 minutes each, for a total of 40 minutes)

Each panelist will be instructed to prepare their comments with the intent of addressing one or more of the questions posed (above) in addition to sharing their own professional engagement or relevant national context on the issue of fake news.

- Muhammad Ashif Entaz Rabi

Ashif Rabi is a Bangladeshi blogger, social activist, and former TV show host on the front lines for the fight for free expression. He is currently a National Endowment for Democracy Fellow exploring ways to form responsible civic digital spaces.

- Yehven Fedchenko                             

Yehven Fedchenko is the Director of the Mohyla School of Journalism in Kyiv, Ukraine, and the co-founder of StopFake.org, a fact-checking project aimed at refuting fake news and misinformation in and about Ukraine.

- Dunja Mijatovic

Dunja Mijatovic, an expert on media law and regulation, is the former OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media, having served from 2010-2016.

- Andreas Vlachos

Andreas Vlachos is a Professor of Computer Science at the University of Sheffield and Chief Research Scientist for Factmata, a British company using artificial intelligence to create and strengthen fact-checking tools.

- Rasha Abdulla 

Rasha Abdulla is an Associate Professor at the University of Cairo and an expert in social media and new media, particularly in the Arab world.

- Paolo Cesarini

Paolo Cesarini is head of unit at the European Commission’s Directorate-General for Competition and will be speaking about upcoming EC efforts to address the issue of fake news.

3. Moderated Inter-Panelist Conversation (15-20 minutes)

Panelists will respond briefly to each other’s opening comments, prompted by questions from the Moderator where necessary.

4. Audience Questions (approx. 30 minutes, until end of Workshop)

The audience—both online and in-person—will be invited to join in discussion with the panelists, raising their own questions and (briefly) sharing their own experiences and perspectives where relevant.


Content of the Session:
The rise of “fake news”—which is primarily spread on the internet through the sharing of online articles and chain e-letters, and posts on social media platforms—has given rise to widespread concern about its negative societal impact, including influencing elections, undermining public faith in institutions, and eroding support for democratic principles. In response, governments and technology companies around the world are working quickly to curb its spread. However, some of the approaches being advanced have the potential to restrict free speech online, limit legitimate civic debate, and damage press freedom.

Proposed responses to fake news ranges wildly: from fining Internet platforms that don’t remove fake news, to government-initiated ‘take down notices’ against fake news purveyors, even to criminal punishment of “rumourmongers” and Internet shutdowns during elections. As this ongoing debate continues, it is vital to amplify voices from civil society, to help ensure that efforts to combat fake news do not unduly burden free expression online.


Tag 1: Freedom of Expression Online
Tag 2: Human Rights Online
Tag 3: Human Rights

Questions Posed:

• What role, if any, should the government play in combatting fake news? What are the different regulatory approaches to fake news being considered, and which ones are most or least consistent with free expression principles?

• What are the specific pros and cons of specific regulatory approaches being proposed?  E.g. proposals to fine social media providers who do not remove fake news in a timely manner; government-funded fact-checkers; government-initiated take-down notices against fake news purveyors; ‘media freezes’ or Internet shutdowns before major civic occasions

• What responsibilities do technology and social media companies bear for addressing fake news?
• What risks to free speech are entailed by efforts to curb the flow of misinformation? What are the tension points between free expression and the fight against ‘fake news’?
• What role can/should civil society play in combatting fake news online, and/or ensuring that government responses to ‘fake news’ do not infringe on our rights?

 

 


Session Organizers
avatar for James Tager

James Tager

Senior Manager, Free Expression Programs, PEN America
- Free expression implications of fake news | - Digital rights and free expression | - Digital censorship and efforts to combat it | - The best place to get chocolate in Geneva


Tuesday December 19, 2017 16:40 - 18:10
Room XI - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

16:40

The Internet of Things and accessibility for people with disability (WS145)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Gunela Astbrink
Proposer's Organization: Women With Disabilities Australia
Co-Proposer's Name: Mr. Shadi Abou-Zahra
Co-Proposer's Organization: W3c
Co-Organizers:
Ms.,Gunela,ASTBRINK,Civil Society,Women With Disabilities Australia
Mr.,Shadi,ABOU-ZAHRA,Technical Community,W3c


Session Format: Birds of a Feather - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: Australia
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Co-Proposer:
Country: France
Stakeholder Group: Technical Community

Speaker: Vint Cerf
Speaker: Maarten Botterman
Speaker: Shadi Abou-Zahra
Speaker: Satish Babu
Speaker: Timmers Paul
Speaker: Gerry Ellis
Speaker: Judith Ann Okite

Content of the Session:
This session will discuss how people with disability can benefit from various applications related to the Internet of Things as well as discussing how to reduce potential barriers.

People with disability use ambient assistive technologies that are especially designed to support independent living. This may include control of lighting, doors, heating, entertainment and security systems integrated through accessible interfaces. These assistive technologies have been expensive. The Internet of Things will mean mainstreaming of such systems. However, interoperability with existing systems and accessible user interface design need to be taken into account so new barriers are not created.

This session brings together experts from the private sector, civil society and international organisations to discuss how policy, standards and innovative design can help to ensure that the Internet of Things is inclusive of many parts of the community.

Sample discussion questions:
Give examples of how the Internet of Things will benefit people with disability
Where will the future take the Internet of Things?
Explain some of the possible barriers
How can we ensure that new barriers are not erected for people with disability?
What role does policy development play?
What role do standards play?
(Other questions and discussion points are likely to arise during the session)

The session agenda:

• Introduction of topic (5 mins)
• Short statements (5 mins each) by subject matter experts (35 mins)
• Set questions by moderator to stimulate discussion among subject matter experts and workshop participants including remote participants (40 mins)
• Summary of key points raised (5 mins)


Relevance of the Session:
The Internet of Things is a ‘hot’ topic especially from the privacy and security aspect. This is a key area of concern for Internet governance as reflected in many fora including the Dynamic Coalition of the Internet of Things. The Internet of Things is shaping our digital future in all areas of our lives. This session will add accessibility for people with disability in terms of the benefits and challenges of the Internet of Things in future. The outcomes of this session will provide direct input into the Dynamic Coalition on the Internet of Things as well as the Dynamic Coalition on Accessibility and Disability. 

Tag 1: Internet of Things
Tag 2: Enhancing Accessibility for Persons with Disabilities
Tag 3: Access and Diversity

Interventions:
Vint Cerf will offer valuable insights into the future direction of the Internet of Things; disability representatives will offer their lived experience of the value that the Internet of Things may provide; policy perspectives will be provided by Maarten Botterman of the Dynamic Coalition on the Internet of Things and Paul Timmers; international accessibility standards will be discussed by Shadi Abou-Zahra and a technical perspective from Asia will be provided by Satish Babu.

Diversity:
Four people in the session have a disability, one of whom is from Kenya, Africa. Both the onsite and online moderators are women as well as two speakers who are yet to be confirmed. While there is a larger number of participants from the Western European region, there is one participant from Asia and one from Africa. Stakeholder groups are well-represented with participants from the private sector, civil society and technical community and have a broad range of policy perspectives.

Onsite Moderator: Gunela Astbrink
Online Moderator: Shreedeep Rayamajhi
Rapporteur: Ivan Ng

Online Participation:
The online moderator is skilled and as a previous MAG member and from the African region, recognises the importance of remote participation. People with disability often do not have the resources to travel to IGF and therefore online participation is essential in this session. The online moderator will plan with the onsite moderator to ensure the remote participation in the session room works well beforehand. The online moderator will be seated next to or in clear sight of the onsite moderator (depending on the room) to intervene when there are online comments. The onsite moderator will ask the online moderator at regular intervals during the session if there are any online interventions. 

Discussion facilitation:
The moderator will stimulate discussion and debate through the Birds of a Feather format. All speakers are subject matter experts but will speak from their own policy perspectives during the guided discussion. The moderator will ensure that audience members and online participants are encouraged to be part of the discussion throughout the session by asking directly for interventions.

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: Yes
Link to Report: http://www.intgovforum.org/cms/wks2014/index.php/proposal/view_public/99

Additional Reference Document Link: https://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/107831

Additional Speakers: 

Andrea Saks

Agenda: 

 

• Introduction of topic (5 mins)
• Short statements (5 mins each) by subject matter experts (35 mins)
• Set questions by moderator to stimulate discussion among subject matter experts and workshop participants including remote participants (40 mins)
• Summary of key points raised (5 mins)

 


Session Organizers
avatar for Gunela Astbrink

Gunela Astbrink

Women With Disabilities Australia
For the past 25 years, Gunela Astbrink has been active in disability policy and research. Recently, she researched ICT accessibility and public procurement in OECD countries. Gunela is a member of the Australian and Pacific Islands Chapters of the Internet Society. She initiated disability... Read More →


Tuesday December 19, 2017 16:40 - 18:10
Room XXVII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

17:00

ITU/UN Women EQUALS in Tech Awards Ceremony: Closing the gender digital divide

Launched by ITU and UN Women in 2014, the fourth annual EQUALS in Tech Awards (formerly GEM-Tech Awards) celebrate initiatives that are closing the gender digital divide. This award will celebrate projects and initiatives whose policies and actions are fully committed towards ensuring that women and girls have an affordable access to technology and the Internet, are empowered with skills on how to use technology, from basic digital literacy through the entire spectrum of STEM education; and allow an equal representation of women professionally which would hopefully encourage their advancement and development within these fields.

The EQUALS in Tech Awards is the flagship event of the EQUALS partnership, a multi-stakeholder initiative created to promote awareness; build political commitment, leverage knowledge, efforts, and resources to achieve digital gender equality at both the global and national levels. 

Join us on December 19 to celebrate three winners that are championing gender digital inclusion. The event will be followed by a cocktail. 

For more information on the 15 Finalists of the 2017 EQUALS in Tech Awards, please visit our website

Speakers:
  • Houlin Zhao, Secretary General, International Telecommunication Union
  • Doreen Bogdan-Martin, Chief, Strategic Planning and Membership Department, International Telecommunication Union
  • Lakshmi Puri, Deputy Executive Director, Intergovernmental Support and Strategic Partnerships Bureau, UN Women | Assistant Secretary-General, UN
  • Kathy Brown, President and CEO, Internet Society (ISOC)
  • Ambassador Thomas Scheidner, Director of International Affairs, Swiss Federal Office of Communications (OFCOM) 
  • Emilar Gandhi, Public Policy Manager for the Southern African Development Community, Facebook 
  • 3 Award winners

Session Organizers
avatar for Loyce Witherspoon

Loyce Witherspoon

Junior Project Officer, International Telecommunication Union (ITU)
Fascinated by intersectionality, gender digital inclusion, and new and emerging technologies.


Tuesday December 19, 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Room XVIII - E

17:20

DC on Community Connectivity

The Dynamic Coalition on Community Connectivity (DC3) is a multistakeholder group aimed at fostering a cooperative analysis of community networks’ potential to promote sustainable Internet connectivity, empowering individuals and fostering the full enjoyment of fundamental rights such as freedom of expression and self-determination.

Session panellist will debate the results of their research, which have been included in the book “Community Networks: the Internet by the People for the People,” which is the Official 2017 Outcome of the DC3. This volume explores benefits, challenges and opportunities for community networks, analysing a series of case studies, and puts forward proposals regarding concrete policies to promote community networking. As a conclusion, this work includes the updated version of the Declaration on Community Connectivity, which was elaborated through a multistakeholder participatory process, featuring an online open consultation, between July and November 2016; a public debate and a feedback-collection process, during the IGF 2016; and a further online consultation, between December 2016 and March 2017.

Free hard copies of the book will be distributed at the DC3 session, which will be opened by the keynote remarks of:

  • Kathy Brown, President and CEO of the Internet Society
  • Jan Dröge, Director of the EU Commission Broadband Competence Offices Support Facility

 

An interactive discussion will follow, stimulated by the short and provocative remarks of the DC3 book authors:

  • Luca Belli, Center for Technology and Society at FGV
  • Sarbani Belur, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay
  • Peter Bloom, Rhizomatica
  • Nathalia Foditsch, American University  
  • Maureen Hernandez, Independent researcher
  • Michel Oghia, Independent consultant  
  • Carlos Rey-Moreno, APC
  • Bruno Vianna, Coolab

Brief presentation of the proposal for a Community Networks map by Luis Martinez, ISOC Mexico 


Session Organizers
avatar for Luca Belli

Luca Belli

Head of Internet Governance, Center for Technology and Society at FGV
Luca Belli, PhD is Senior Researcher at the Center for Technology and Society (CTS) of Fundação Getulio Vargas (FGV), where he heads the Internet Governance project. Luca is also associated researcher at Centre de Droit Public Comparé of Paris 2 University. For those who do not... Read More →


Tuesday December 19, 2017 17:20 - 18:20
Room XII - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

17:20

Big-data, business and respect for human rights (OF49)

Big-data, business and respect for human rightsTuesday 19/12  Room XXI E from 5:20 to 6.40 PM

OPEN FORUM n. 49

Organizational Affiliation:
 joint open forum by WBU/EBU, Council of Europe and Swiss Federal Department of Foreign Affairs (FDFA)

SCOPE OF THE SESSION

Is it possible for business entities to use Big Data in a fair way that respect human rights and privacy rules ?
This open forum will bring together companies, governments and other stakeholders to discuss the importance of fostering sustainable and responsible business on/via the Internet, with regard to the management of (big-)data. It will explore the opportunities for governments, companies and the civil society to constructively collaborate together, in order to address common issues facing the management of (big-)data.
Various models of self-regulation in the use of Big Data will be discussed in the Media, in non ICT and in the Internet sector.
Swiss policy in relation with the Business and human rights framework at the national level (Swiss government) will be presented.
While Council of Europe will present model of enforcement and of self-regulation agreements at the international level.                 

BACKGROUND 
The European Broadcasting Union (member of the WBU)  has made the challenge of big-data a priority. A ‘big-data’ week has been organised in Geneva with speakers from
all over the world (including UN privacy rapporteur Prof. Joe Cannataci) to  discuss why big-data are so sensitive as media and how could do they relate to human rights.

The Swiss Federal Department of Foreign Affairs (FDFA) is following the topic of big-data because of its implications for the realisation and promotion of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights.

The Council of Europe is also working on big data related issues from a standard setting angle, having already addressed the data protection implications of big data and examining the broader impact of algorithms on human rights. 

In a press release issued on 4 April 2016, the Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights underlined that the effects of business practices on human rights have become a central issue for human rights protection. He also referred to a survey carried out by The Economist which highlighted that many businesses have started to view themselves as important actors in respecting human rights. While it is the task of governments to secure for everyone within their jurisdiction the rights and freedoms enshrined in the European Convention on Human Rights, there is now wide recognition that businesses are key actors in the respect for human rights. This is confirmed by the Committee of Ministers in a Declaration in 2014 and a Recommendation in 2016.
The protection of personal data and the right to privacy online are at odds with the very nature of the Internet which is to facilitate the free flow of (big-)data in an open environment. There is a growing technological ability to collect, process and extract new and predictive knowledge from great volume, velocity, and variety of data. The main issue is the analysis of the data using software to extract new and predictive knowledge for decision-making purposes regarding individuals and groups. 

MAIN TOPICS OF DISCUSSION:
-       Respect for human rights - what are the challenges for Internet business vis-à-vis respecting human rights in the management of personal data they process? To what extent have the tech sector/Internet businesses committed to respecting the UN Guiding Principles on business and human rights (i.e. ‘Ruggie Principles’). How companies can avoid infringing on the human rights of others and how should they address adverse human rights impacts with which they are involved?

-       Fostering business online - looking ahead, how can governments, business and other stakeholders work together to respect human rights in the management of personal data? Where are common issues and opportunities of collaboration? What does sustainable and responsible Internet business practice look like? Reference to good practices.

-       Conclusions :

The final round of interventions, will close the discussion with proposal of solutions on how to establish a correct relation between digital service suppliers and their users on the way to use their data.

Tag 1: Big Data

Tag 2: Human Rights Online

Tag 3: Digital Geneva Convention

Organizers: Giacomo Mazzone for EBU, Rémy Friedmann for FDFA, Peter Kimpian and Lee Hibbard for CoE:

Moderator:
Lee Hibbard - Council of Europe

SPEAKERS:

EBU – Giacomo Mazzone Head of Institutional Relations

FDFA– Rémy Friedmann,  Senior Advisor, Desk Human Security and Business, Federal Department of Foreign Affairs (FDFA)
- Human Security Division, Deputy Head, Human Rights Policy Section

CoE - Corina Călugăru,  Coordinator on Information Policy (TC-INF), Ambassador, Permanent Representative of Republic of Moldova to the Council of Europe

CoE – Alessandra Pierucci, Chair of Data Protection Committee of Council of Europe

eXascale/scigility – Philippe Cudré-Mauroux,  
Full Professor at the University of Fribourg, Switzerland, leading the eXascale Infolab. 

Institute for Human Rights and Business - John Morrison,  Executive Director of IHRB

Microsoft – Bernard Shen,  Assistant General Counsel     Corporate, External & Legal Affairs – Business & Human Rights

Name of Online Moderator: Peter Kimpian

Background Papers  & Links to relevant documents and to recently organized events

FROM THE PRESS : THE GUARDIAN:

https://www.theguardian.com/science/political-science/2017/dec/15/data-will-change-the-world-and-we-must-get-its-governance-right

EBU-UER:

-