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Access & Inclusion & Diversity [clear filter]
Monday, December 18
 

09:00 CET

Tackling gender divides: ICT and women’s economic empowerment (WS37)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Sophie Tomlinson
Proposer's Organization: ICC BASIS
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Timea Suto
Co-Proposer's Organization: ICC BASIS
Co-Organizers:
Ms Reema Nanavaty, Civil Society, Self Employed Women's Association (SEWA) India
Ms Towela Nyirenda, Inter-governmental Organization, NEPAD, African Union
Ms Sophie Tomlinson, Private sector, ICC BASIS


Session Format: Other - 90 Min
Format description: The format will be a “Campfire Session”. The goal of a campfire session is to create an open forum in which the attendees generate the majority of the discussion and knowledge sharing. The session will open with speakers/experts interventions. For the remainder of the session, the speakers become facilitators, inviting comments and questions from those around the room and letting the audience dictate the ultimate direction of the conversation. Campfire sessions allow attendees to drive their own learning, listen to multiple perspectives on the same issue, and share experiences with individuals throughout the room.

Proposer:
Country: France
Stakeholder Group: Private Sector

Co-Proposer:
Country: France
Stakeholder Group: Private Sector

Speaker: Ambassador Tobias Feakin, Government of Australia
Speaker: Reema Nanavaty SEWA
Speaker: Souhila Amazouz, African Union NEPAD
Speaker: Kate Doyle, Promundo 
Speaker: Asma Ennafer, Orange
Speaker: Will Hudson, Google
Speaker: Joyce Dogniez, ISOC



Content of the Session:
Internet Governance issue:
This workshop will explore the complex relationship between ICT and women’s economic empowerment and evaluate the contingent probing factors which are posing challenges to women being truly empowered by ICT. The goal is to illustrate how different stakeholders contribute to supporting women’s economic empowerment through ICT and survey opportunities and address challenges faced in developed and developing countries.

Session format:
The format will be a “Campfire Session”. The goal of a campfire session is to create an open forum in which the attendees generate the majority of the discussion and knowledge sharing. The session will open with speakers/experts interventions. For the remainder of the session, the speakers become facilitators, inviting comments and questions from those around the room and letting the audience dictate the ultimate direction of the conversation. Campfire sessions allow attendees to drive their own learning, listen to multiple perspectives on the same issue, and share experiences with individuals throughout the room.

The purpose of this workshop is to survey experiences and generate best practices on how stakeholders can tackle gender divides and boost the use of ICT to promote the empowerment of women. The campfire session format will facilitate this goal by enabling knowledge exchanges through an informal learning environment. Participants will be encouraged ahead of time via social media to bring questions, case examples and subject matter theories of their own to share with the group.

Agenda:
Although discussion and participants contributions will ultimately drive the agenda, the following will be used to guide conversation:
• The session will start with a short video of a case study example of how an ICT application can be used to support women’s economic empowerment (for example a mobile application for rural women entrepreneurs in India which has automated the supply chain process, allowing women to sell farm produce within their local communities more efficiently, to reduce travel time and generate more business opportunities). As an ice-breaker to help participants feel engaged and comfortable in the group, the moderator will ask the audience questions about the case study video by asking for a show of hands. The organisers will explore providing paper and pens with questions for the participants so they have time to reflect on answers. (15 minutes)
• Experts representing different stakeholder groups (business, civil society, technical community and government) will be invited to explain how ICT supports women’s empowerment and the role they play in initiatives which seek to empower women through ICT. Speakers will be encouraged to use concrete examples (30 minutes)
• Participants will share ideas on the probing factors which are posing challenges to women being truly empowered by ICT (for example: online abuse, socio-economic and cultural factors, role of family members, education and skills etc.) and suggest economic, social, technical and governance policy considerations. Speakers will become facilitators, inviting responses to comments and questions from those around the room and letting the audience dictate the ultimate direction of the conversation. The moderator will manage the discussion to ensure diverse interventions in person and remotely. (40 minutes).
• Moderator wrap up and summarize main take a ways (5 minutes)


Relevance of the Session:
This workshop will be directly related to the IGF 2017 theme as it will provide an important discussion on how the ICT ecosystem can support sustainable development (focus drawn to SDG 5) and highlight the ways in which stakeholders can work together to support women’s digital futures and overcome challenges facing women to become truly empowered by ICT.

The issue provides a timely link to Internet governance more broadly as the United Nations 2030 development agenda reflects the growing understanding that ICTs can be powerful instruments for advancing economic and social development through the creation of new types of economic activity, employment opportunities, enhancements in health-care and education and the enrichment of participation and advocacy within society. The WSIS+10 outcome document also recognizes the potential of ICTs as tools for promoting gender equality and Goal 5 of the UN sustainable development goals includes a target to “Enhance the use of enabling technology, in particular ICT, to promote the empowerment of women”.The workshop will provide an opportunity for IGF participants to share ideas on how to reach these goals.


Tag 1: Access and Diversity
Tag 2: Empowerment
Tag 3: Gender Issues

Interventions:
Speakers have been chosen to ensure geographic, gender, sector, and stakeholder group diversity. Each speaker will bring a unique perspective and experience to opportunities and challenges faced.

Moderator

-         Elizabeth Thomas-Raynaud, ICC BASIS

Speakers

-         Souhila Amazouz, African Union

-         Kate Doyle, Promundo

-         Asma Ennafer, Orange

-         Joyce Dogniez, ISOC

-         Ambassador Tobias Feakin, Government of Australia

-         Reema Nanavaty, SEWA

Online Moderator

-         Müge Haseki, University of Pennsylvania

Rapporteur

-         Sheetal Kumar, Global Partners Digital

 

All speakers will be given the opportunity to share short interventions on the topics discussed and will be encouraged to participate in discussion with participants.


Diversity:
Each stakeholder group will be represented (civil society, business, technical community and government) and speakers will represent different geographies and cultures.

Co-organizers and speakers will include representatives from developing countries (for example NEPAD and SEWA). Co-organizers bring the unique perspectives of a trade union for self-employed women workers (SEWA) and an organization that has experience facilitating and coordinating the development of programmes in Africa (NEPAD).

Efforts will be made to introduce new perspectives in the dialogue such as development practitioners which have not been heard in Internet governance discussions (for example Promundo and SEWA).

Gender balance has been encouraged through speaker choices and each speaker will bring unique expertise and experience to the topics discussed. Efforts have been made to ensure that men are represented in this discussion as they have a role to play in women’s economic empowerment.

Special attention will be made throughout the planning of the session to ensure diverse interventions from workshop participants can be facilitated by working closely with the remote moderator in the planning of the session.

Organisers will encourage remote participation by promoting the workshop and subject area on social media in the run up to the IGF and will explore facilitating interventions from remote hubs.

The remote moderator will be a youth participant and organizers will encourage youth participation. 

Onsite Moderator: Elizabeth Thomas-Raynaud, ICC BASIS 
Online Moderator: Youth Ambassador
Rapporteur: Sheetal Kumar, Global Partners Digital 

Online Participation:
The remote moderator will be involved throughout the workshop planning phase in an advisory role. Organizers have identified a youth online moderator for this role to provide a substantive opportunity for an IGF youth participant. The remote moderator will represent the technical community dotAsia and will be invited to assist in bringing youth participants into the discussion.

The Moderator will frequently communicate with the remote moderator thr

...

Session Organizers
avatar for Sophie Tomlinson

Sophie Tomlinson

Assistant Policy Manager, ICC BASIS
Sophie Tomlinson is the Assistant Policy Manager for the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) Commission on the Digital Economy and Business Action to Support the Information Society (BASIS) initiative. In that capacity, she manages ICC's policy development from the global business... Read More →


Monday December 18, 2017 09:00 - 10:30 CET
Room XXI - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

10:40 CET

CENB III
Session Organizers
avatar for Mili Semlani

Mili Semlani

My voluntary experience with Internet and Communication Technology (ICT) policy space started as a Netmission Ambassador in 2013 and the APrIGF Fellowship in 2017 further propelled my enthusiasm to work in this ecosystem. As a youth ambassador I was part of the pilot team to introduce... Read More →


Monday December 18, 2017 10:40 - 12:10 CET
Room XXVII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

10:40 CET

Small Island Developing States (SIDS) Roundtable: Are we running out of resources & bandwidth? (WS4)

Proposer's Name: Mr. Tracy Hackshaw
Proposer's Organization: Internet Society Trinidad & Tobago Chapter
Co-Proposer's Name: Mr. Patrick Hosein
Co-Proposer's Organization: Director, Trinidad & Tobago Multistakeholder Group (TTMAG)
Co-Organizers:
Mr.,Tracy,HACKSHAW, Technical Community, Internet Society Trinidad & Tobago Chapter (ISOC-TT); Ms.,Maureen,HILYARD, Civil Society, Pacific Islands Chapter of the Internet Society (PICISOC); Dr.,Patrick HOSEIN, Academic Community, Trinidad & Tobago Multistakeholder Advisory Group (TTMAG)


Session Format: Round Table - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: Trinidad and Tobago
Stakeholder Group: Technical Community

Co-Proposer:
Country: Trinidad and Tobago
Stakeholder Group: Technical Community

Discussant: Samuels Carlton - Jamaica
Discussant: Hosein Patrick - Trinidad & Tobago
Discussant: Yaw Ching Rhea Trinidad & Tobago/United States of America
Discussant: Maureen Hilyard - Cook Islands
Discussant: Jane Coffin - United States of America
Discussant: Anju Mangal - Fiji
Discussant: Bevil Wooding - Trinidad & Tobago


Content of the Session:
As the Internet continues growing and consumption patterns increase globally, will there come a point when the resources available in Small Island Developing States be unable to support the needs of its users?

The SIDS continue to struggle with resource challenges in all forms - water, food, shelter, energy, quality of air - and many of these challenges have the potential to further drain the limited bandwidth, network resources and human capacity available to public, private and civil society actors in these territories.

While these resource challenges engage the attention of inhabitants of the SIDS, the Digital Economy is advancing at breakneck speed, attracting talent and attention to the OECD countries, and increasingly, to the emerging mega economies of Brazil, India, Russia and China.

The increasing disparity in resource allocation at all levels exacerbates the "Digital Inclusion problem" - both within SIDS and between SIDS and the OECD+BRIC economies - which then presents "traditional" employers, entrepreneurs seeking to grow and participate in the Digital Economy, Government policymakers grappling with mounting socieconomic challenges and perhaps most critically, the "average citizen".

How then do we, as small, vulnerable economies, work together to meet and rise above this challenge, or risk being quite literally drowned in the Digital Revolution?

The 2017 Roundtable will bring together developmental and Internet Governance and Policy experts from the Caribbean and Pacific Islands as we continue to advance our shared/collective research and action Agenda at the most open and inclusive United Nations Forum dealing with issues relating to the Internet, ICT and Development. 

DRAFT AGENDA

Welcome & Introductions (5 mins)

Discussant Topic 1 - 20 mins - OPEN ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION
As the Internet continues growing and consumption patterns increase globally, will there come a point when the resources available in Small Island Developing States be unable to support the needs of its users?

Discussant Topic 2 - 30 mins - OPEN ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION
The SIDS continue to struggle with resource challenges in all forms - water, food, shelter, energy, quality of air - and many of these challenges have the potential to further drain the limited bandwidth, network resources and human capacity available to public, private and civil society actors in these territories.  How then do we, as small, vulnerable economies, work together to meet and rise above this challenge, or risk being quite literally drowned in the Digital Revolution?

Open Roundtable Discussion & The Way Forward


Relevance of the Session:
The inclusion of the economic action by Small Island Developing States must form a part of any global debate on Shaping the Digital Future. Given the sustainability challenges being faced by the SIDS, the Roundtable and the topic addressing head-on the issue of looming technical, human and bandwidth resource deficits is critical to a Forum looking towards the Future and how ALL stakeholders, including the approximately 65 million inhabitants of the 50+ countries and territories that make up the SIDS.

Tag 1: #accessandinclusion
Tag 2: #sustainabledevelopment
Tag 3: Digital Economy

Interventions:
As we have been doing for the last few years, we will be utilizing our highly successful Roundtable format where everyone in the session can participate equally. Our approach functions in like manner as combined "talkshow" and "Town Hall" format where a moderator will introduce the topic and invite identified "Lead Discussants" (the invited Subject Matter Experts) to introduce the key themes of the discussion - prepared and discussed with the moderator online in the leadup to the IGF - and immediately invite participation from in situ and remote participants on each of the key themes. Discussants and Participants will engage in meaningful dialog while the moderator will work to ensure that the critical elements of the engagement are documented and pushed forward in the ongoing SIDS Action and Research Agenda in the area of Digital/Internet Policy & Governance.


Diversity:
Over 90% of our discussants are from developing countries - the majority being from some of the most vulnerable countries on the planet. Additionally, the very nature of SIDS defines our session as being geographically diverse.

According to the UNOHRLLS, SIDS are by and large very small countries. Cuba is the most populated island with 11.3 million inhabitants and the least populated country is Niue with 1,500 inhabitants. The SIDS have a combined population of about 65 million, which is slightly less than one percent of the world's population. Further, some SIDS like Niue actually experience negative population growth (-2.3 percent) due to the high level of emigration (to New Zealand, in the case of Niue).

In terms of gender diversity, we propose to achieve full gender parity at the level of the Discussants.


Onsite Moderator: Tracy Hackshaw
Online Moderator: ISOC IGF Ambassador from a Small Island Developing State - name to be nominated by the ISOC NGL Leadership
Rapporteur: ISOC Youth@IGF Fellow from a Small Island Developing State - name to be nominated by the ISOC NGL Leadership

Online Participation:
Remote Participants will be treated as equals in the Roundtable. The Remote Moderator will be encouraged to engage in online discussions with our Remote Participants and to create opportunities for interventions in the live session - through both comments and questions - potentially directly from the participant if technically feasible. The Moderator will frequently poll the Remote Moderator during the discussions to ensure that Remote Participants are not treated as an "afterthought". 

Discussion facilitation:
As in the past, the organizers and discussants will use social media and their own networks to "seed" the discussion prior to the Roundtable. Questions and ideas will be incorporated into the planning of the "live" Roundtable and the moderator will pose some of these questions directly during the Roundtable to create further engagement. Additionally, we will appoint a "Social Moderator" who will monitor the #IGF2017 and Workshop hashtags to incorporate comments and questions into the discussion.

Our approach functions in like manner as combined "talkshow" and "Town Hall" format where a moderator will introduce the topic and invite identified "Lead Discussants" (the invited Subject Matter Experts) to introduce the key themes of the discussion - prepared and discussed with the moderator online in the leadup to the IGF - and immediately invite participation from in situ and remote participants on each of the key themes. Discussants and Participants will engage in meaningful dialog while the moderator will work to ensure that the critical elements of the engagement are documented and pushed forward in the ongoing SIDS Action and Research Agenda in the area of Digital/Internet Policy & Governance.


Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: Yes
Link to Report: https://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/filedepot_download/4098/214

...

Session Organizers
avatar for Tracy Hackshaw

Tracy Hackshaw

Director/Chair- Elect, Trinidad & Tobago Multistakeholder Advisory Group (TTMAG)
Connect with me on LinkedIn (www.tracyhackshaw.com)


Monday December 18, 2017 10:40 - 12:10 CET
Room XXI - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)
 
Tuesday, December 19
 

09:00 CET

EU Delegation to the IGF & Youth IGF Movement (OF78)
The main idea of the present proposal for an Open Forum is to share with the IGF multi-stakeholder community the concept and the outcomes of the Youth IGF Movement meetings that took place around the world. 

The format of the Open Forum is intended to be a debate between the young from the Youth IGF Movement and the Information Society experts namely the members of the EU Delegation to the IGF, as well as the representatives of the Asia-Pacific community, African countries and Latin America.

We would like also to invite the leaders of the private sector for discussion with these young leaders. The Open Forum welcomes the representatives of other youth initiatives to enagage in an inclusive dialogue with the leaders of the IGF community. 


Four main topics have been identified by the young for discussion:

* Fake news online

* GPDR and the impact on EU and non-EU young citizens  

* Blockchain technology and the need for new digital skills:  young entrepreneurship

* Raising awareness of the young on internet safety and their responsibilities: the role of the young

*****

The purpose of this Open Forum is to allow the voice of young people to be heard by Information Society experts on issues related to internet governance and to help young people to take an active part in decision-making processes. 

One of the focus points will also be to see how the recommendations which emerge from the present Open Forum can be taken into consideration at national and regional levels and what needs to be done to achieve this. 
Tag 1: #accessandinclusion
Tag 2: #youth
Tag 3: #InternetSafety
Name(s) of Speaker(s):

* With the participation of Mrs Mariya GABRIEL, 
EU Commissioner for Digital Economy and Society

* Key foreword: Mr Michał BONI, MEP, EPP, Chair of the Delegation

& Mr George SADOWSKY, ICANN Board

*Message from:  Mrs Julie WARD, MEP, S&D & Mrs Jacqueline BEAUCHERE, Microsoft (tbc)

*Key invitees: EP Delegation to IGF, Moctar YEDALY - AUC, Mihail KOMAROV- Academia, HSE

*Young Leaders, representatives of the: Youth IGF Movement  &  Asia Pacific Youth IGF (among others)


Name of Online Moderator: Mr Goncalo ROQUE FONSECA

Background Paper: short_note.pdf
Past IGF Participation: Yes
Report Link: http://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/content/igf-2016-day-1-room-10-of53-youth-igf-eu-delegation
Name: Ms. Yuliya Morenets
Organizational Affiliation: EU Delegation & TaC-Together against Cybercrime International
 

Session Organizers
avatar for Yuliya Morenets

Yuliya Morenets

TaC-­‐Together against Cybercrime International
Today, Yuliya leads non-profit organisation TaC-Together against Cybercrime International, which works on the empowerment of users in the field of safe and responsible Internet, child online protection and the Internet Governance issues.Yuliya is an expert belonging to a number of... Read More →


Tuesday December 19, 2017 09:00 - 10:00 CET
Room XXIII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

10:40 CET

DC on Net Neutrality

The annual session of the UN IGF Dynamic Coalition on Network Neutrality (DCNN) promotes multistakeholder analysis about the state of Net Neutrality in the world.  

In 2017, Zero Rating* continued to be one of the most discussed net neutrality issue and, for this reason the session will be largely dedicated to the Zero Rating Map, which is 2017 outcome of the DCNN.  The purpose of the Map is to build an open access resource that can contribute to the promotion of a more informed debate on Net Neutrality and Zero Rating and can be exploited by a wide range of stakeholders, including researchers, regulators, entrepreneurs and user rights advocates. The Zero Rating Map is an ongoing effort and the beta version will be presented during the session in order to stimulate feedback from the participants.

To date, inputs on Zero Rating practices in several countries have already been collected, utilising an open Ethercalc sheet. All interested stakeholders are invited to contribute to this crowdsourced effort, adding information regarding their respective countries. The Ethercalc sheet will remain open to receive submissions during the IGF and after the IGF, and the Zero Rating Map will be regularly updated, including the most recent information added to the Ethercalc sheet. The Zero Rating Map will be available on www.zerorating.info 

The elaboration of the Zero Rating Map is coordinated by Dr Luca Belli, DCNN Chair and Senior Researcher at the Center for Technology & Society at Fundação Getulio Vargas (CTS/FGV). All contributors to this effort will be able, but not obliged, to include their name as authors of the contributions to the Map. Contributors stating their name will be explicitly acknowledged in the Zero Rating Map, which will be graciously maintained by CTS/FGV.

Keynote remarks:

  • Sébastien Soriano, President of ARCEP and Chairman of BEREC

Speakers include:
  • Luca Belli, Head of Internet Governance, Center for Technology and Society at FGV
  • María Paz Canales, Executive Director, Derechos Digitales
  • Maryant Fernandez, Senior Policy Advisor, EDRi 
  • Amba Uttara Kak, Tech Policy Fellow, Mozilla
  • Dhanaraj Thakur, Senior Research Manager, Web Foundation/Alliance for Affordable Internet
  • Alfredo Velazco, Executive Director, Usuarios Digitales

 

* For further information on Zero Rating, see the 2016 DCNN Outcome on “Net neutrality reloaded: zero rating, specialised service, ad blocking and traffic management


Session Organizers
avatar for Luca Belli

Luca Belli

Professor and Head of CyberBRICS.info, FGV Law School
Luca Belli, PhD is Professor of Internet Governance and Regulation at Fundação Getulio Vargas (FGV) Law School and associated researcher at the Centre de Droit Public Comparé of Paris 2 University. He focuses on the regulation of Internet access, data protection (particularly regarding... Read More →


Tuesday December 19, 2017 10:40 - 11:40 CET
Room XXIV - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

12:00 CET

NRIs Collaborative Session: Multilingual Internet: IDNs under the magnifying glass

Co-proposers/co-organizers

  1. Macedonia IGF (FYRO) 
  2. Nepal IGF
  3. Russian IGF
  4. SEEDIG 
Session title
Multilingual Internet: IDNs under the magnifying glass

Session format and timing
This session will be 90 minutes long, and will be organized as a round-table, allowing all in situ and online participants to contribute to the discussions.

Content of the session
This session has a twofold objective: to raise more awareness on Internationalised Domain Names (IDNs) and their relevance in the quest for a more inclusive Internet; and to explore challenges (and possible solutions) related to the implementation and use of IDNs.

In this context, the session will be structured in three parts:

Segment 1: Multilingualism and IDNs: What and why? The session will start with a short intro into the issue of multilingualism on the Internet, and will continue with a brief introduction to IDNs.
Segment 2: IDNs through the eyes of end-users. This segment will be focused on end-users, and their perceptions of, experiences with, and expectations from IDNs.
Segment 3: IDNs behind the scenes. The technical community (registries, registrars, ICANN, the Universal Acceptance Steering Group, etc) and the private sector (search engines, e-mail service providers, etc.) will be invited to talk about what they do in the area of IDNs, and how they (can)respond to end-users’ needs and concerns related to IDN usability. This segment will include experience sharing (from existing IDN registries, Internet companies, etc), discussions on challenges faced in implementing IDNs, overviews of the work done to address such challenges, etc. Other stakeholders involved in the promotion of IDNs will be included in this segment as well (e.g. governments, IGOs, etc.).

Depending on the level of interaction in the room, segments 2 and 3 could be combined into a Q&A-type discussion, where there will be a dialogue among end-users, registries, registrars, Internet companies, other technical organisations, etc.

The session will rely on a strong moderation (2 moderators) and several resource persons whose role will be to help set the scene for discussions, by sharing national and regional perspectives.  A set of questions will also be developed, to help engage participants in the discussion.

The rapporteur(s) will present key messages from the session in the last  minutes of the session.

The session aims for fully interactive discussion with all present participants.

Speakers/Resource persons
Segment 1: 
Jonne Soininen, ICANN Board 
Segment 2: 
Lianna Galstyan, Internet Society Armenia
Segment 3:  
Irina Danelia, Coordination Center for TLDs .RU/.РФ
Sanja Simonova, MARnet
Alena Belskaya, Hoster.by for TLDs .BY/.БЕЛ
Edmon Chung, Universal Acceptance Steering Group
Jennifer Chung, DotAsia Registry

Relevance of the issue
IDNs were launched with the aim to make the Internet more inclusive, by giving users the possibility to access and register domain names in their own languages and scripts. IDNs overall objective is to empower more people to use the Internet. They are especially relevant to the regions using the non-Latin script. Many countries in the Eastern European region, but also in Asia Pacific have direct experiences on this, given the diversity of scripts (i.e. Armenian, Cyrillic, Georgian, Greek, Latin. In some countries, IDN country code top-level domains (ccTLDs) have been implemented (Armenia, Belarus, Bulgaria, Macedonia FYR (.МКД), Russia (.РФ), Serbia, etc.) or are in the process of being implemented (Greece), while other countries have announced their intention to implement IDNs in the future (such as Bosnia and Herzegovina). In addition, the New gTLD Program launched by ICANN in 2012 opened the door for IDN generic top-level domain (gTLDs), such as .сайт “.website”, .онлайн “.online”, etc.. But there is a need to raise more awareness and promote a better understanding of IDN-related challenges, in order to ensure that the initial objective of IDNs is achieved. 

Interventions/Engagement with participants (onsite and online)
Several guiding questions will help frame the discussions. Examples below.
Segment 1: 
What are IDNs? Why and how did this idea came to life?
Segment 2: 
A live quiz (using an online tool such as Mentimeter) will be prepared for session participants to answer on the spot. It will include questions related to the actual use of IDNs (whether session participants use IDNs and why, whether they find value in IDNs, what advantages and disadvantages they see in IDNs, challenges related to the use of IDNs, recommendations for improving IDNs, etc.). The survey conducted by SEEDIG in early 2017 could serve as a source of inspiration in developing this quiz.
Segment 3:
For registries: For registries: Why embarking on a journey to introduce IDNs? What was/is your main motivation? | Share one challenge you have faced during this journey and what you have done or are doing to address it. | Are you satisfied with what you have achieved after launching the IDN? | What challenges do you still face regarding the usability of your IDN? Regarding the /РФ domain experience I should say that the main challenge we are facing is some technical restrictions with IDN e-mail, or restrictions in using these domains in some registration forms and so on. We strongly believe that if vendors could solve such kind of problems there will be another giant leap in number of registrations and usage.
For registrars: Why including IDNs in your offering? | What is the demand for IDN domain names, among your client base? | What are the main complains you get from your clients when it comes to IDNs? | What is, in your view, the main aspects that needs to be addressed/improved, to have IDNs more widely used.
For Internet companies: What is your perspective on the usability of IDNs?
For ICANN/Universal Acceptance Steering Group: What is ‘universal acceptance’ and how do we get there? 
For Governments/IGOs: Why are IDNs among your concerns? 

Geographical, Stakeholder and Gender Diversity
The session will not have speakers as such, but the co-organisers will make sure that the session respects diversity criteria, both among the resource persons, and throughout the overall session discussions.

Onsite moderator(s)
Andrea Beccalli, ICANN
Mikhail Anisimov, Coordination Center for TLDs .RU/.РФ
 
Online moderator(s)
Aleksandar Icokaev

Rapporteur(s)
Sorina Teleanu

Online participation logistics
Webex and Twitter will be used to gather input from online participants.

Discussion facilitation
The session will rely on strong moderation, with two moderators facilitating discussions among all session participants.



Session Organizers
avatar for Lianna Galstyan

Lianna Galstyan

ISOC Armenia, External Relations Manager, ISOC Armenia


Tuesday December 19, 2017 12:00 - 13:30 CET
Room XXII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

12:10 CET

Financing and building sustainable community networks - the Coolab experience (WS111)

Proposer's Name: Mr. bruno vianna
Proposer's Organization: coolab
Co-Proposer's Name: Mr. marcelo saldanha
Co-Proposer's Organization: Instituto Bem Estar Brasil
Co-Organizers:
Mr. Adriano BELISARIO, Civil Society, Coolab
Mr. Rafael ZANATTA, Civil Society, IDEC


Session Format: Flash Session - 30 Min

Proposer:
Country: Brazil
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Co-Proposer:
Country: Brazil
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speaker: Adriano Belisario
Speaker: Rafael Zanatta
Speaker: Marcelo Saldanha
Speaker: bruno caldas vianna
Speaker: Paulo Duarte Paulo Roberto Duarte de Souza Júnior

Content of the Session:
In this session we will make a short presentation of the Coolab experience and some partnerships with other NGOs that works with community providers. Coolab is a collective dedicated to the creation of free networks in Brazil. We provide loans and support for the communities to create their own infrastructure. When these loans are returned we can invest in new communities. This way we believe we can create a sustainable practice for bridging the digital divide.

Coolab's methodology itself provides empowerment of the community by ensuring that the design and installation is made by neighbors after a week of immersion and training.

In March 2017, Coolab was selected as most novel project in Mozilla’s Equal Rating challenge, which allowed us to start operations with a 30.000 USD endowment.

Relevance of the Session:
We see community networks as a most valuable tool to regain control of the Internet infrastructure, as well as the most democratic method for closing the digital divide. By taking control of the communications infrastructure, communities not only are able to decide on local connectivity governance, but they enables neighbors in different technical fields. Local networks foster the local economy more than the ones created by government or corporations, by creating local jobs and driving maintenance costs; they’re more efficient and resilient. Being able to design, build and manage their own infrastructure is a great incentive to the overall empowerment of the community and vital for shaping the future of the Internet as an open, accessible and democratic arena.



Tag 1: Digital Divide
Tag 2: Community Networks
Tag 3: Capacity Building

Interventions:
Marcelo Saldanha and Adriano Belisário will put the debate about legal issues in the case of brazilian regulations and how those regulations talk about community connectivity and democratization of the telecom
Laura Tresca will talk about the capacity building and the methodology used by coolab to create and make ignitions in the communities, including some examples of community networks created and their infrastructures
Rafael Zanatta will talk about the part of the methodology and the model created by coolab through a cooperative process
Paulo Duarte will talk about initiatives that Nupef and coolab creates together

Diversity:
We'll propose a gender balanced panel with different stakeholders.

Onsite Moderator: Bruno Vianna
Online Moderator: Bruno Freitas
Rapporteur: Adriano Belisário

Online Participation:
We want to offer an online experience as close to the onsite one as possible. The online moderator is very familiar with the issues debated and he will have time to prepare himself further in the months before the event. He will take questions and comments from the online audience and propose them at the most appropriate moments.

Discussion facilitation:
As the time is very limited, we will have the speakers talk very briefly, in a concise form. There will be no physical separation between speakers and audience; we will dispose chairs in a circle mixing all participants. This will, we believe the audience is more encouraged to engage.

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: No
Link to Report: 

Additional Speakers: 

Nils Brock, journalist and researcher (Phd at the Free University of Berlin) in the field of communication politics and media development. Freelance writer and correspondent in Latin America for 12 years (eg. Jungle World, welt-sichten, Nachrichtenpool Lateinamerika, NPLA). Co-founder of Flujos.org media collective in Mexico in 2007. Since then, he has had several experiences as media trainer and producer. International aidworker for AMARC Brasil (2012-2017). Since September 2017 project coordinator and media developer for NPLA in Berlin, Germany.

Agenda: 

1. Introduction – 10 minutes

2. Presentation of Coolab proposal and results so far – 30 minutes

3. Open for participants’ questions – 20 minutes

4. Sharing of participants experiences on sustainable networks – 30 minutes

5. Debate on community-based ustainable networks – 45 minutes

6. Next steps and conclusions - 15 minutes

 


Session Organizers

Tuesday December 19, 2017 12:10 - 12:40 CET
Room XXVI - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

12:30 CET

DC on Public Access in Libraries

TITLE:  Policy Changes for Public Access

DESCRIPTION:

This Session of the Dynamic Coalition on Public Access (DC-PAL) has two objectives: the first is to share real-world examples of the important role libraries perform by providing public access to the Internet. Four speakers will bring experience from Africa, Latin America and the Pacific.

The second objective is more ambitious. Building on the Principles on Public Access agreed in 2015, DC-PAL wants to launch a deeper analysis of the tangible policy changes needed to make a reality of public access in libraries.

What are the barriers, and what are the enablers of high impact projects?

What can we learn from different regional experiences? What made them successful or not? Which technology or regulatory framework the respective governments employed?  What policy prescriptions the DC-PAL should prioritize and why?

The DC-PAL session at IGF 2017 will serve as a springboard to start gathering information from all stakeholders.

NAMES OF SPEAKERS:

  • Maria Garrido – Technology and Social Change Group, University of Washington

Maria Garrido will discuss the Developing Access for Information Report (DA2I) that recognizes that access to information is crucial for sustainable development, and offers affirmation of the work that libraries do in guaranteeing public access to the Internet. (20 minutes).

 

  • Janet Sawaya – EIFL Public Library Innovation Programme and advisor for Initiatives for Africa works on capacity building initiative for public librarians in Africa, and developing new partnerships. Before joining EIFL, Janet worked for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation as programme officer in the Global Libraries Programme, and as Deputy Director for Nutrition and Maternal Newborn and Child Health.

 

  • Winston Roberts – IFLA/National Library of New Zealand. Winston has contributed to government digital strategy development, promoted projects in support of public libraries, literacy and book development, liaised with UNESCO, and represented New Zealand at the World Summit on the Information Society in 2003 and 2005. He was the Secretary of the Conference of Directors of National Libraries (2006 to 2010). He continues to be active in the Regional Section of IFLA for Asia-Oceania and in various other IFLA groups.

 

  • David Ramirez-Ordonez (remotely). David is librarian, blogger and teacher. He has focused his work on copyright, freedom of expression and freedom of access to information and how the Internet affects our lives. He has participated in regional meetings for exceptions and limitations to copyright for libraries. He is a professional in information science – librarian and has an MA in education. He creates the Colombian Public Domain Calculator, helps to develop the Colombian legal deposit and works in digital libraries. More at www.nomono.co/david

 

Moderator: Esmeralda Moscatelli, Policy and Research Officer, IFLA

ORGANIZER(S) NAME(S): Esmeralda Moscatelli, Janet Sawaya, Stephen Wyber
ORGANIZATION

Session Organizers
avatar for Esmeralda Moscatelli

Esmeralda Moscatelli

Policy Officer, IFLA
Libraries and Public Access


Tuesday December 19, 2017 12:30 - 13:30 CET
Room XXIII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

15:00 CET

Assessing implications of Internet Shutdowns according to Internet Governance Principles (WS178)

Proposer's Name: Mr. Hartmut Glaser
Proposer's Organization: Brazilian Internet Steering Committee (CGI.br)
Co-Proposer's Name: Mr. Juliano Cappi
Co-Proposer's Organization: NIC.br
Co-Organizers:
Mr.,Carlos,DESOUZA,CivilSociety,Instituto de Tecnologia e Sociedade - ITS-Rio

Session Format: Round Table - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: Brazil
Stakeholder Group: Technical Community

Co-Proposer:
Country: Brazil
Stakeholder Group: Technical Community

Participants:
Carlos Affonso (Civil Society, ITS Rio, Brazil)
Kyung-Sin Park (Technical Community, Korea University / Open Net Korea)
Monica Rosina (Private Sector, Facebook, Brazil)
Neide Oliveira (Government Sector, Federal Prosecution Service, Brazil)
Paul Fehlinger (Civil Society, Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network)
Peter Micek (Civil Society, Access Now, US)
Stefanie Felsberger (Civil Society, A2K4D, Egypt)
Susan Chalmers (Government Sector, NTIA, US)
Thiago Tavares (Civil Society, SaferNet, Brazil)

Content of the Session:

This workshop aims at discussing the shutdown of Internet applications and services in selected countries, delving into their motivations and impacts considering the technical, economic and social perspectives. Debates about the interruption of access to Internet services and content are not recent. In 2011, during the “Arab Spring”, websites like Twitter and Facebook were cut off within Egypt in an attempt of the government to prevent social media from being used to foment political protests. Despite some policy advances in the past few years, in 2016, Vladmir Putin threatened to block Google, Twitter and Facebook if they didn’t comply with a demand of data from Russian bloggers. Last December, Justice John Nicholas from the Australian Federal Court, ordered Internet service providers (ISPs) to “take reasonable steps to disable access” to Pirate Bay, Torrentz, and the streaming service SolarMovie, in a bid to crack down on online copyright infringement. The suggested strategy to block the applications was using the domain name system (DNS). In Brazil, the subject returned to the center of the debates between in 2015, mainly due to the action of the judiciary, which issued decisions on the blocking of Whatsapp throughout the country; a measure that affected citizens and organizations from other countries in the region. The decisions looked at telecommunication network operators and ISPs and led to discussions at the Legislative and the Supreme Court.
In this context, the proposed agenda includes a debate on the following issues: a) shutdown as a mechanism for law enforcement; b) challenges and risks of implementing application blocking; c) Internet Governance Principles at stake (net neutrality, freedom of expression, innovation).
Panelists will be invited to discuss the emergence of this new “Internet shutdowns trend” in a round-table. There will be an initial presentation to set the scene that will be followed by an open discussion. In order to stimulate the debate, representatives from government, technical community, civil society, lawyers and Internet applications will be invited to join the discussion.

Relevance of the Session:
This proposal is relevant to the extent that it seeks to broaden the scope of analysis that focus on Internet shutdowns, considering the technical economical and social impacts of its implementation and the various constraints involved in the cases of interruption of access to applications worldwide.
Despite the emergence of new cases regarding interruption of access to some specific Internet applications in the last years, many disputes and conflicts generated by its implementation have not been settled at all. Apparently, government institutions are using that strategy as an essential instrument to enforce national legal systems on transnational services. From a legal perspective, it is important to highlight that case law on the issue is scarce in many countries and that the technicalities of the Internet are still a challenge for justice operators who are striving to make sense of the complexity of the matter.. From a technical perspective, the implementation of application blocking is a challenge that involves many different instances of the Internet. The implementation on the physical layer may lack precision, resulting on the exclusion of unexpected groups of Internet users and even unexpected Internet services. The use of the Domain Name System to block a given application may raise questions on the role of Internet registries, registrars, name server providers, hosting providers, etc., which are entitled fundamentally of operating domain names. Finally, from the social perspective the increase in the number of cases of application blocking cases may endanger basic Internet Governance principles like Network Neutrality, freedom of expression and innovation – having a particular impact on developing countries. It is fundamental to bring together different actors involved in the implementation of application blocking to debate the issue in a multistakeholder, interdisciplinary and international context in order to advance in comprehending this phenomena and identifying its causes in order to put attention to them from different perspectives.

Tag 1: Blocking
Tag 2: Net Neutrality
Tag 3: Freedom of Expression Online

Interventions:
The session is structured around three 30-minute segments. The first will count on a general introduction about the topic under discussion by one of the moderators. He will summarize his briefing by posing a policy question to the participants. The question will be related the overall impacts of Internet shutdowns and application blocking observed in different regions. A 20-minute segment will follow in which participants in the round-table will be able to make 2-minute interventions at a time. In the second 30-minute segment, the other moderator will present some conceptual and practical challenges related the tensions between localization and the transnational nature of Internet flows, with a special focus on the issue of jurisdiction. He/she will provoke participants to look into the future with a policy question related to the “challenges for the next decade” in relation to issue of jurisdiction. Another 20-minute segment will follow in which participants in the round-table will be able to make 2-minute interventions at a time. The last part of the session will comprise a 30-minute open mic session that will be based on a policy question that delves into “the role of the multistakeholder community in coping with the facts and challenges listed in the previous segments”. The five last minutes of the third segment will be used by the moderators to summarize discussions.

The workshop participants are:

Moderators
Paul Fehlinger (Civil Society, Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network)
Thiago Tavares (Civil Society, SaferNet, Brazil)

Speakers
Carlos Affonso (Civil Society, ITS Rio, Brazil)
Kyung-Sin Park (Technical Community, Korea University / Open Net Korea)
Monica Rosina (Private Sector, Facebook, Brazil)
Neide Oliveira (Government Sector, Federal Prosecution Service, Brazil)
Peter Micek (Civil Society, Access Now, US)
Stefanie Felsberger (Civil Society, A2K4D, Egypt)
Susan Chalmers (Government Sector, NTIA, US)

Diversity:

The perspective defined to approach the complexity of application blocking requires a broad diversity of participants to accomplish the workshop objectives. The selected cases of application blocking are from different countries, involve actors from different sectors of society and also demands a multidisciplinary approach considering the broad impact of its implementation. As Internet shutdowns may affect specific groups in different manners, gender diversity is also fundamental to understand and measure the problem.

Onsite Moderator: Paul Fhelinger - Civil Society, Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network
Onsite Moderator: Thiago Tavares - Civil Society, SaferNet, Brazil

Online Moderator: Diego Canabarro - Technical Community - NIC.br

Rapporteur: 
Jamila Venturini - Technical Community - NIC.br
Rapporteur: Vinicius W. O. Santos - Technical Community - NIC.br

Online Participation:
Online participation and interaction will rely on the WebEx platform. Those joining the session using WebEx (either invited members of the round-table or the general audience) will be granted the floor in the open debate segment of the workshop. People in charge of the moderation will strive to entertain onsite and remote participation indiscriminately. Social media (twitter and facebook) will also be employed by the online moderators who will be in charge of browsing social media using hashtags.

Discussion facilitation:
The discussion in the proposed session will be facilitated around three policy questions posed for the participants in the round-table as well as the audience in general: (1) what are overall impacts of Internet shutdowns and application blocking in different regions? (2) what are the challenges for the next decade in relation to issue of jurisdiction bearing in mind the tensions between localization and transnationality of Internet services and flows? And (3) what is the role of the multi

...

Session Organizers
avatar for Nathalia Sautchuk Patricio

Nathalia Sautchuk Patricio

Technical Advisor, NIC.br
I'm a computer engineer. I am a Technical Advisor to CGI.br and professor in some universities. My interests are: network neutrality, Education and ICT, Social and Digital Inclusion.
avatar for Vinicius W. O. Santos

Vinicius W. O. Santos

Expert advisor, NIC.br / CGI.br
Expert advisor to the Brazilian Internet Steering Committee (CGI.br)
avatar for Jamila Venturini

Jamila Venturini

Regional Coordinator, Derechos Digitales
Periodista, desde 2007 trabaja en la intersección entre tecnologías y derechos humanos. Entre 2014 y 2017 fue parte del Centro de Tecnología y Sociedad de la FGV Direito Rio (CTS/FGV), donde lideró proyectos relacionados con gobernanza de internet, vigilancia y privacidad. Fue... Read More →


Tuesday December 19, 2017 15:00 - 16:30 CET
Room IX - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

15:00 CET

Universal Design and Creating an Accessible Digital Future (WS54)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Kaoru Mizuno
Proposer's Organization: ITU
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Andrea Saks
Co-Proposer's Organization: G3iCT
Co-Organizers:
Dynamic Coalition on Accessibility and Disability (DCAD) (http://www.itu.int/en/ITU-T/accessibility/dcad/Pages/default.aspx)

Global Initiative for Inclusive ICTs (G3ict) (http://g3ict.com/ )


Session Format: Other - 90 Min
Format description: Open forum discussion preceded by brief presentations

Proposer:
Country: Switzerland
Stakeholder Group: Intergovernmental Organizations

Co-Proposer:
Country: United States
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speaker: Andrea Saks
Speaker: Gerry Ellis
Speaker: Gunela Astbrink
Speaker: Judith Ann Okite
Speaker: Shadi Abou-Zahra

Content of the Session:
Since the approval of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) in 2006, much efforts have been made to achieve an inclusive society for everyone, including persons with disabilities and persons with specific needs. Their voices are starting to be heard, and the progress is reported in participation of persons with disabilities in decision-making processes at national level. However in many countries, this is still an area for improvement.
It is important to understand that disability is not attached to just a few persons but to all of us especially when we age, and that we need to remove barriers in society in order to allow persons with disabilities and those with age related disabilities to enjoy their rights on equal basis with others
“Universal design" is defined by UNCRPD Article 2 and means the design of products, environments, programmes and services to be usable by all people, to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design. "Universal design" shall not exclude assistive devices for particular groups of persons with disabilities where this is needed.
ICT technologies can play an important role in achieving an inclusive society. If universal design is considered at an early stage of the development of ICT technologies and systems, then expensive refits can be avoided. If this is not done, there is a risk of creating new barriers to accessibility.
Taking into consideration rapid development and prevalence of Internet of Things (IoT) technologies worldwide, it is urgent to promote, among others, key principals, concept and practice of universal design, and take appropriate measures for the implementation globally interoperable.
This workshop will discuss these issues and identify the way forward towards a truly inclusive society through ICT technologies.


Relevance of the Session:
The goal of the workshop is to raise awareness to everyone that it is imperative to achieve an inclusive society. ICT accessibility for persons with disabilities and those with specific needs can be achieved only by including them in the discussions around the Internet Governance and the creation of accessible ICT products and services. Their voices must be heard by governments, regulators, designers and standard writers so that our Digital Future will be accessible for everyone. 

Tag 1: Enhancing Accessibility for Persons with Disabilities
Tag 2: Access and Diversity
Tag 3: 

Interventions:
All proposed speakers' views/perspectives/expertise have been discussed during DCAD conference calls and agreed by the DCAD members. The speakers will briefly make presentation, then they will receive questions from the audience. This is to increase audience participation time and encourage discussion.

Diversity:
All proposed speakers are international experts on accessibility for persons with disabilities, diversity in gender and region/country, including speakers from developing countries. 

Onsite Moderator: Andrea Saks
Online Moderator: Kaoru Mizuno
Rapporteur: Kaoru Mizuno

Online Participation:
There will be designated onsite moderator for remote participation. The workshop will use the ITU Guidelines for supporting remote participation in meetings for all (http://www.itu.int/pub/T-TUT-FSTP-2015-ACC). The moderator will have the full list of remote participants and their affiliations. Should there be persons who are blind participating remotely who cannot access directly the remote participation tool, due to the fact that they are not able to access the 'hand-raising' mechanism with their screen reader, they will be recognized by the Chair during all question & answer sessions so that they are able to make comments directly. 

Discussion facilitation:
The moderator of the workshop will at the beginning take a roll call of all the participants and their affiliations, so that the moderator can call on individuals to comment on subject pertaining to their interest. A list of questions will be prepared in advance to ask both the speakers and the audience so that the discussion will be interactive and inclusive. 

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: Yes
Link to Report: http://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/index.php?q=filedepot_download/4098/356

Additional Speakers: 

Masahito Kawamori, ITU-T Q26/16 Rapporteur, Keio University

Muhammad Shabbir, Islamabad Pakistan Chapter

Agenda: 

  1. Introduction to the workshop topic by Andrea Saks, onsite moderator of the workshop
  2. Brief presentations by accessibility experts to raise issues
  • Universal design – principles and practice, by Gunela Astbrink, Women With Disabilities Australia
  • Impairment, Disability and Universal Design, Key concepts for Accessibility, by Gerry Ellis, Feel The BenefIT
  • Standardization efforts at ITU for an accessible global future, by Masahito Kawamori, ITU-T Q26/16 Rapporteur, Keio University
  • Next Generation Web Accessibility Guidelines, by Shadi Abou-Zahra, World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)
  • ICT Accessibility in Pakistan: Challenges and Opportunities, by Muhammad Shabbir, Islamabad Pakistan Chapter

3. Open discussion stimulated by the onsite moderator

4. Wrap-up of the discussion

 


Session Organizers
AJ

Andrea J. Saks

Chairman JCA-AHF, ITU
ACCESSIBILITY FOR PERSON WITH DISABILITIES BOTH VIRTUAL AND PHYSICAL, TO INCLUDE REMOTE PARTICIPATION AND REMOTE PARTICIPATION TOOLS THAT STILL ARE INACCESSIBLE TO THE BLIND BETTER ACCESS TO ICTS INCLUDING BROADBAND , LONG DISTANCE LEARNING, REMOTE EDUCATION,ACCESSIBLE WEB SITES AND... Read More →


Tuesday December 19, 2017 15:00 - 16:30 CET
Room XXVII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

16:10 CET

Is there a place for civility in our digital future? (WS99)

Proposer's Name: Mr. Nicholas Carlisle
Proposer's Organization: No Bully
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Clara Sommarin
Co-Proposer's Organization: UNICEF
Co-Organizers:
Mr, Nicholas, Carlisle, Civil Society, No Bully
Ms, Clara, Sommarin, Intergovernmental Organization, UNICEF


Session Format: Other - 90 Min
Format description: Fishbowl

Proposer:
Country: United States
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Co-Proposer:
Country: United States
Stakeholder Group: Intergovernmental Organizations

Speaker: Nicholas Carlisle
Speaker: Clara Sommarin
Speaker: Christopher Castle
Speaker: Jacqueline Beauchere
Speaker: Ki Chun, David NG

Content of the Session:
Were you “unfriended” on Facebook because you expressed a viewpoint that did not sit well with others? Were you so put off by the words and actions of a colleague that you “unfollowed” them on Twitter? Has the level of discourse online stooped to such new lows that you found yourself loosing trust in others, stressed out or even not sleeping? If you answered “yes” to any of these, take some comfort - you are not alone.

New preliminary research indicates that 65% of people around the world, including teens, have suffered some sort of negative experience online, which has led them to be less trusting of others both online and off. A full report on the state of digital civility, personal online safety and digital interactions was made available on International Safer Internet Day 2017, and follow-on research from the originally surveyed countries as well as several more will be available for the IGF.

In keeping with this theme, there is a growing movement across the globe to restore the original promise of the Internet of connectivity and a common space for all. In 2017 UNESCO, Facebook, and No Bully launched a global campaign to combat cyberbullying that is bringing together technology companies, the private sector, civil society organizations, educators, and youth to achieve collaborative impact on one of the biggest issues facing children and teens online. UNICEF has been working on its own research on online bullying and online child sexual exploitation and abuse, and will reference these education and awareness-raising campaigns.

Goals of this Fishbowl
• Get out of our own Fishbowl and listen to others
• Deepen the understanding of the impediments to online civility
• Generate strategies to activate the big switches that can reduce online bullying and hate speech among youth
• Share knowledge and feedback on existing initiatives and address what is not working
• Raise awareness among key influencers about what is increasingly being perceived as a problem.

Above all else – we want this to be a highly interactive session where the audience drives the conversation. We’re here to listen and learn, not drive. If you want to be a wall flower in this session, watch out. You might be called on …


Relevance of the Session:
This workshop is directly related to the IGF 2017 theme as it explores a set of issues that, if not addressed, could discourage existing and new internet users from fully utilizing it. As mentioned earlier, the original promise of the Internet was connectivity and a common space for all. Without addressing the issues of bullying and exploitation online, that promise is threatened. In a worst-case scenario, there will be a reduced or even no digital future for many.

Tag 1: Digital Literacy
Tag 2: Youth Engagement
Tag 3: Global Citizenship

Interventions:
Our “Speakers” will serve more as discussants and help with audience engagement. After reviewing some of the research in this area, the speakers will share brief perspectives on the topic of digital civility and bullying. But the the key role for our speakers will be to engage with the audience and bring them into the discussion. We expect a wide diversity of views from the audience participants to make this a valuable session.

Diversity:
The nature of our session, a highly interactive discussion with the audience (as opposed to talking at the audience), lends itself to an extremely diverse session. While we have a small handful of speakers listed in the proposal from various stakholder groups and regions, their role is quite limited. Their aim is to provide a variety of brief perspectives – from IGO and civil society to private sector and youth and to help engage the audience/participants in discussions and exchanges. Due to the relevance of this topic to the theme of the IGF and the global concern about civility online, we expect participation from across the multistakeholder community. Our experience shows that this topic is particularly suited to audience participation because everyone, regardless of where you are from or what stakeholder group you represent, is impacted and interested in advancing digital civility.

Please note that one of our discussion facilitators, David Ng, is a placeholder for a Youth Ambassador from NetMission in Hong Kong. Those have not been selected yet.

Onsite Moderator: Jim Prendergast
Online Moderator: Berry Cobb
Rapporteur: Jim Prendergast

Online Participation:
Through the various networks of each of the participating organizations, we will publicize the session in advance to generate awareness in the community of those who are working in this area but are not able to make the trip to Geneva. Our moderator will coordinate closely with the remote moderator to ensure that remote participants are given ample opportunity to offer comments, ask questions and make other interventions as we shape a truly global, multi-stakeholder dialogue.

We will also conduct advanced outreach to the remote hub coordinators to ensure they are aware of our session and have a copy of any materials.


Discussion facilitation:
Aside from a brief overview of some research there will be no speeches, presentations or other dais-led discussions. Again, our “speakers” will act more as discussion facilitators and will engage the audience to make them a part of the conversation. In fact – we don’t really want an audience – we want a room full of participants.

Organizers will develop a list of thought-provoking questions to spur conversation. In addition, we will closely work with the remote moderator to ensure online participants are afforded equal opportunity to participate.

Ideally, the room would allow for re-arranging of the furniture to make it a big circle to better foster interaction and participation – as if one were sitting around a campfire.

Proposed Agenda
Welcome and Overview - 2 minutes Moderator
Overview of the Research – 8 minutes
Reaction from Discussion Facilitators - 10 minutes
Open discussion among audience participants facilitated by Moderator and Discussion Facilitators- 60 minutes
Summarize outcomes and next steps – 10 minutes


Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: No
Link to Report: 

Additional Speakers: 

Tommaso Waybe Bertolotti

Tommaso Wayne Bertolotti is a philosopher of technology. He earned his PhD at the University of Pavia, in Italy, where he is adjunct professor of cognitive philosophy. His research focuses on the ethical and cognitive impact of Internet technologies, especially as it concerns social cognition and other cultural and biologically inherited aspects of human life. He lives in Paris where he collaborates with the French engineering school Telecom ParisTech. Since Spring 2017 he inaugurated his own brand of philosophical consulting, MonPhilosophe, to leverage the importance of philosophy in addressing everyday challenges.

Agenda: 

Welcome and Overview - 2 minutes Moderator
Overview of the Research – 8 minutes
Reaction from Discussion Facilitators - 10 minutes
Open discussion among audience participants facilitated by Moderator and Discussion Facilitators- 60 minutes
Summarize outcomes and next steps – 10 minutes

...

Session Organizers

Tuesday December 19, 2017 16:10 - 17:40 CET
Room XXIII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

16:40 CET

The Role of Internet Governance Content in Shaping our Digital Futures (WS168)

Diversity in the Internet’s multistakeholder model: the role of Capacity Building and multilingual Internet Governance Content in promoting an Inclusive Internet

Proposer's Name: Ms. DALILA RAHMOUNI and Ms Olga Cavalli
Proposer's Organization: French Ministry of Foreign Affairs and South School on Internet Governance

Co-Proposer's Name: Mr. Dustin Phillips
Co-Proposer's Organization: ICANNWIKI

Co-Organizers:
Ms., Dalila RAHMOUNI, Government, French Ministry of Foreign Affairs Mr., Emmanuel ADJOVI, International Organization, International Organization of La Francophonie

Dustin Phillips - Civil Society – ICANNWiki

Adrián Carballo - Civil Society - CCAT LAT Centro de Capacitación para América Latina y el Caribe

Julio César Vega Gómez - Private Sector - Asociación de Internet MX

Session Format: Debate - 90 Min

Speakers
Speaker: Emmanuel ADJOVI
Speaker: Charly Berthet - French Digital Coucil

Speaker: Lucena Claudio
Speaker: Garcia Van Hoogstraten Caterine 
Speaker: Witaba Bonface
Speaker: Jennifer Chung

Session Format: Debate - 90 Min

Content of the Session:
In 1990, 75% of the Internet users lived in developed countries. Today, more than 66% of Internet users live in developing countries. In 2030, an overwhelming majority of users will access the Internet from Asia, Africa and Latin America.

With multistakeholder processes and a global set of actors, Internet governance (IG) is often viewed as an inclusive ecosystem. It’s true that the IG community has made progress in becoming more inclusive in recent years, but there is still a lot of work to be done to give everybody a voice in shaping their digital futures. This panel will examine this task through the lens of Internet governance content.

WSIS+10 Outcome Document recognizes that there is a digital divide among developed and developing countries, with a primary dimension being content accessibility.The approach to closing the digital divide must be multidimensional, looking beyond mere connectivity to understand the quality of access to linguistically relevant and localized content. The creation of high quality, multilingual Internet Governance content is one way to help developing countries and the Internet community at large understand the complexity of Internet services and addressing the challenges of regulations, cybersecurity and other technological developments that directly shape their everyday lives.

Promoting an inclusive Internet governance ecosystem is essential to the future of the globally connected Internet. If strides aren’t made toward closing the digital divide and people don’t have a voice in shaping the very resource that shapes their lives dramatically, there will be negative effects for the Internet as a whole.

The debate will be opened under these general ideas:
How inclusive is Internet governance?

How can the different stakeholders contribute to the Internet governance model?
What risks do we face if Internet governance fails to be a truly inclusive ecosystem?
What role does Internet governance content play?
How can we improve Internet governance content?
How can this content be created considering the multilingualism?
How can we go beyond multilingual content to localized content?
What are the challenges related with different scripts? Have IDNs helped?

Relevance of the Session:
In 1990, 75% of the Internet users lived in developed countries. Today, more than 66% of Internet users live in developing countries. In 2030, an overwhelming majority of users will access the Internet from Asia, Africa and Latin America.

The future of the Internet Governance depends on the capacity of the Internet community to be representative of the diversity of world in terms of stakeholders, culture, language, regional representation and gender inclusion.

Tag 1: Access and Diversity
Tag 2: Internet Governance and the role of the different stakeholders
Tag 3: Multilingualism and Local Content

 

 


Session Organizers
avatar for Olga Cavalli

Olga Cavalli

Academic Director, South School on Internet Governance
Olga Cavalli is an Internet leader whose work has been fundamental for enhancing participation of Latin America and the Caribbean in Internet Governance.She is the co-founder and the academic director of the South School on Internet Governance which has granted more than 3,500 fellowships... Read More →


Tuesday December 19, 2017 16:40 - 18:10 CET
Room IX - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)
 
Wednesday, December 20
 

09:00 CET

Internet Inclusion Solutions: Shaping the Digital Future (WS58)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Karen McCabe 
Proposer's Organization: IEEE
Co-Proposer's Name: Mr. Justin Caso
Co-Proposer's Organization: IEEE
Co-Organizers:
1 World Connected Mr., Christopher, Yoo, Technical Community, 1 World Connected, and University of Pennsylvania


Session Format: Round Table - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: United States
Stakeholder Group: Technical Community

Co-Proposer:
Country: United States
Stakeholder Group: Technical Community

Speaker: Christopher Yoo
Speaker: Jane Coffin
Speaker: Sonia Jorge
Speaker: Roger Baig
Speaker: Samar Baba

Content of the Session:
From a collective of initiatives and programs dedicated to an internet for all, we see definitive opportunities to accelerate progress in connecting the estimated 60 percent of the global population who remains unconnected around the world. We also see that closing the gap of the digital access divide is multi-faceted and requires working across various domains, as well as locally, so that the digital future of communities and citizens is meaningful, impactful and sustainable.
Online access is a main channel to connect to services, learning, entrepreneurship and opportunity that leads to social and economic growth and development. But in working to make the internet for all vibrant, affordable and valuable, there is a mix of inter-related aspects and needs that must be holistically and locally addressed.  These include helping communities remove barriers, improving communications infrastructure and services, determining what technologies to deploy, new innovative business models, building skills and capacity, education, effective policy making, trust and privacy protection and empowering people.
At this interactive roundtable, speakers will share and discuss regional perspectives and current, real-world case studies on meaningful and sustainable internet inclusion solutions that are shaping the digital future of communities. The speakers will openly dialogue on what worked and what did not, lessons learned, the importance of networks of communities, and what needed to initiate, launch, build and sustain projects that ultimately transition to and are integrated into a local community’s daily life.


Relevance of the Session:
Bringing the unconnected online, specifically in developing and underserved regions of the work, requires not only a collection of issues and needs that must be addressed on a regional and local level, it also requires empowerment of community citizens to enable skill development and capacity building, development of content that is relevant to their communities and culture and understanding local business and social needs. These elements are vital to help sustain meaningful access for social and economic growth, but also for the members of the communities to shape their digital futures.

Tag 1: community empowerment
Tag 2: community networks
Tag 3: internet inclusion

Interventions:
In an interactive roundtable, the speakers will provide their perspectives and insights rooted in real-world connectivity projects and initiatives in which they are engaged. Initially led from a moderated question and answer segment, the roundtable will be open to all attendees of the session to join the discussion, to enrich an deepen the content of the session.

Diversity:
The proposed roundtable includes a young woman and student from Tunisia. It includes a gentleman from Spain who has help built and sustains a robust community network and is pursuing a PhD on community networks. It includes a woman with deep knowledge of the internet governance and who advocates for policies for affordable internet access and provides ICT policy and regulatory advice on a global scale. It includes a professor who is spearheading significant work on internet inclusion projects around the world, and a women from an organization dedicated to an internet for all, who works collaboratively across local communities and organizations for expanding internet infrastructure, access and related capacities in emerging economies. 

Onsite Moderator: Karen McCabe
Online Moderator: Justin Caso
Rapporteur: Christopher Jannuzzi

Online Participation:
In this type of session, the online moderator will act as the voice of the online participants by actively intervening on their behalf to allow them to make their own statements or ask their questions over audio/video or by intervening on their behalf. The session moderator will work closely with the online moderator to ensure that the online participants have full, active and meaningful participation during the entire duration of the session. 

Discussion facilitation:
In this interactive roundtable, a moderator will facilitate the discussion amongst the speakers where they will initially briefly provide their perspectives and insights that are based on real-world connectivity projects and initiatives in which they are engaged. The session will open with a moderated question and answer segment that will ask thought provoking open-ended questions to get at and discuss the issues surrounding the topics. The focus of this session is to be an open dialogue amongst the speakers and the audience. The roundtable discussants will directly engage the in situ and online attendees as they address the questions and as the dialogue progresses--as the participant engagement and inclusion in the dialogue is of upmost importance. 

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: Yes
Link to Report: http://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/index.php?q=filedepot_download/4098/224

Additional Reference Document Link: http://internetinitiative.ieee.org/images/files/resources/white_papers/universal_access_feb2017.pdf

Agenda: 

In this interactive roundtable, a moderator will facilitate the discussion amongst the speakers where they will initially briefly provide their perspectives and insights that are based on real-world connectivity projects and initiatives in which they are engaged. The session will open with a moderated question and answer segment that will ask thought provoking open-ended questions to get at and discuss the issues surrounding the topics. The focus of this session is to be an open dialogue amongst the speakers and the audience. The roundtable discussants will directly engage the in situ and online attendees as they address the questions and as the dialogue progresses--as the participant engagement and inclusion in the dialogue is of upmost importance. 

 


Session Organizers
avatar for Karen McCabe

Karen McCabe

Senior Director Technology Policy, IEEE
Senior Director of Public Affairs, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Leading efforts in the IEEE Internet Initiative, including the focal area of advancing solutions to connect the unconnected. For more information, please see: http://internetinitiative.ieee.org/.I... Read More →


Wednesday December 20, 2017 09:00 - 10:30 CET
Room IX - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

10:10 CET

Equipping populations with the skills to shape and secure their digital future (WS141)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Sophie Tomlinson
Proposer's Organization: ICC BASIS
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Timea Suto
Co-Proposer's Organization: ICC BASIS
Co-Organizers:
Mr Virat Bhatia, Private Sector, Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce & Industry
Ms Cristina Cárdenas, Government, Government of Mexico
Mr Lorenzo Pupillo, Civil Society, Centre for European Policy Studies
Ms Sophie Tomlinson, Private Sector, ICC BASIS


Session Format: Break-out Group Discussions - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: France
Stakeholder Group: Private Sector

Co-Proposer:
Country: France
Stakeholder Group: Private Sector

Speaker: Kenta Mochizuki
Speaker: Virat Bhatia
Speaker: Jianne Soriano
Speaker: Lorenzo Pupillo
Speaker: Samar Baba
Speaker: Udoh Moni
Speaker: Cristina Cardenas
Speaker: Jon Chippindall, Barefoot Computing Project
Speaker: Edward Choi, Netmission Ambassador

Content of the Session:
Internet Governance issue:
Information communication technology (ICT) is recognised as an important tool to facilitate many of the UN Sustainable Development Goals, yet there is also recognition that populations must be equipped with the necessary skills (literacy, technical, soft) to meaningfully use and reap the benefits of ICT. As ICT becomes an innate aspect of daily life for many, cyber awareness and online safety are also becoming increasingly important.

In developed countries greater use of digital technologies increases demand for new skills and fuels new and traditional occupations’ growing reliance on ICT skills. At the same time, the OECD’s Survey of Adult Skills suggests that more than 50% of the adult population in 28 OECD countries can only carry out the simplest set of computer tasks, such as writing an email and browsing the web, or have no ICT skills at all. In developing countries, digital technology is creating new learning opportunities for local communities by providing access to education and enhancing basic literacy skills. However, a report from the UNESCO Institute for Statistics has found that, despite the development of ICT in education policies, the integration of technology in classrooms across sub-Saharan Africa remains insufficient to meet the needs of the 21st century labour market. This workshop aims to address these paradoxes which are leading to an increasing global interest in encouraging digital literacy to help manage impacts of digital dislocation.

The purpose of this workshop is to take stock of the activities different stakeholders in developed and developing countries are pursuing to empower populations with the skills needed for success in the digital economy. By surveying the global trends which are impacting and amplifying the growing need for a broader digital literacy culture, participants will analyse where opportunities lie and gaps persist to help overcome challenges.

Session format:
Through break-out group discussion, by answering the question: How can we equip populations with the skills needed to shape and secure their digital future?, participants from business, civil society, technical community, government, youth groups and education will evaluate how initiatives by different stakeholders can support the development of skills and promote a culture of tech literacy and cyber awareness so citizens of both developed and developing countries can meaningfully participate in the digital economy, reap the sustainable benefits of ICT and shape their digital future.

Agenda:
• The workshop will open with an ice-breaker which will involve all participants (10 minutes). This will entail polling participants on short questions related to the barriers/stereotypes social groups face in equipping themselves with the skills to use and apply ICT. The game aims to create an inclusive engaging environment and raise some of the key issues for discussion.
• Following the interactive ice-breaker, participants will hear insights from a diverse range of experts from civil society, education, business, government, including youth speakers from developed and developing countries on their experience managing or participating in initiatives that promote digital literacy and or use of ICT in education (20 minutes).
• The third part of the workshop will involve break-out group discussion and participants will form several groups (amount dependent on participation numbers). Diverse experts will be assigned to each break-out group and an activity sheet will be prepared in advance with questions for the groups to discuss. The questions will be related to the overarching workshop question and how stakeholders can work together to equip populations with the skills needed to shape and secure their digital future (30 minutes).
• Following the break-out group discussion the groups will report back on discussion and the workshop will conclude with interaction between all participants to define key takeaways (30 minutes).

Relevance of the Session:
The workshop will explore the challenges and opportunities developing and developed countries face when seeking to empower their populations with the necessary skills to reap the benefits of ICT and excel in the digital economy. The workshop relates directly to the main theme of IGF 2017 as it will provide an opportunity for stakeholders to discuss how proactive efforts can equip populations with the skills required to shape and secure their digital future. The workshop will hear from youth speakers and present examples and lessons learnt from initiatives around the world that are driving education, supporting digital skilling and promoting online safety/security awareness to help young people and underrepresented groups succeed in a digitalized environment. 

Tag 1: Digital Literacy
Tag 2: Digital Future
Tag 3: Digital Work

Interventions:
Kenta Mochizuki of Yahoo Japan will share private sector perspectives on steps business can take to encourage digital skilling. Mr Mochizuki has experience working with youth participants in Internet governance and other spheres to bring to the discussion.

Virat Bhatia, Chair of Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce & Industry digital economy committee, will share updates on efforts in India to drive digital literacy and share his experience in the private sector of opportunities and challenges faced.

Edward Choi  is a Youth representative from NetMission.Asia based in Hong Kong and will share unique perspectives on how young people are equipping themselves with skills for their digital futures.

Lorenzo Pupillo of the Centre for European Policy Studies with share perspectives on activities undertaken by civil society and the opportunities and challenges the Centre for European Policy Studies have noted when providing education initiatives on security and cyber awareness skills.

Samar Baba is the president of the Tunisian section of the Special Interest Group on Humanitarian Technology (SIGHT). The Tunisian programme seeks to leverage technology for sustainable development in underserved communities. Ms Baba will share her experience managing projects that support use of ICT in schools in Tunisia.

Moni Udoh of the Government of Nigeria will share her experience of the opportunities and challenges faced during the implementation of programmes in schools and use of ICT to facilitate education in Nigeria.

Cristina Cárdenas of the Government of Mexico will share Mexico’s experiences in encouraging the population to be computer literate and prepare citizens across age groups on the skills and knowledge needed to participate in the digital economy.

Jon Chippindall, Barefoot Computing Project,  is one of the Barefoot Computing Teaching and Learning Resource Developers currently on secondment to the project. Prior to this he was a Year 5 teacher and the Computing Leader at Crumpsall Lane Primary School in North Manchester. Jon is a CAS Master Teacher working to support other teachers across the region in developing and delivering their computing curriculum and works with trainee teachers at The University of Manchester.

Diversity:
This workshop aims to gather a variety of perspectives to address the question: How can we equip populations with the skills needed to shape and secure their digital future? Each stakeholder group will be represented and speakers will represent different geographies (including developing countries), cultures and policy perspectives.

Organizers will also make an effort to secure participants from youth and the education sector who may not be involved in Internet governance activities but to whom this topic relates. This will ensure introduction of new perspectives which have not been heard previously at IGF.
For example, ICC BASIS is working to identify a speaker from the BT Barefoot programme which is a programme set up by British Telecom (BT) and the British government to provide training for primary school teachers on computer classes for children. The barefoot teacher will provide unique and important insights into the experience of an education practitioner working in computer science and directly with children to build their digital skills. ICC BASIS is also in the process of identifying a speaker from a user company to

...

Session Organizers
avatar for Sophie Tomlinson

Sophie Tomlinson

Assistant Policy Manager, ICC BASIS
Sophie Tomlinson is the Assistant Policy Manager for the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) Commission on the Digital Economy and Business Action to Support the Information Society (BASIS) initiative. In that capacity, she manages ICC's policy development from the global business... Read More →


Wednesday December 20, 2017 10:10 - 11:40 CET
Room XXII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

11:50 CET

Open Source: Defending Freedoms in the Digital Future (WS8)

Proposer's Name: Mr. Satish Babu
Proposer's Organization: ISOC-TRV
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Judith Okite
Co-Proposer's Organization: FOSS Foundation for Africa
Co-Organizers:
Mr.Satish, Babu, Civil Society, ISOC Trivandrum Chapter, India
Ms.Judith, Okite, Civil Society, FOSSFA, Kenya
Ms.Mishi, Choudhary, Civil Society, SFLC New York, USA

Session Format: Break-out Group Discussions - 90 Min

Location: Room XXII E

Proposer:
Country: India
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Co-Proposer:
Country: Kenya
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speaker: Mishi Choudhary
Speaker: Glenn McKnight
Speaker: Sarah Kiden
Speaker: Olivier Crepin-Leblond
Speaker: Panayotis Antoniadis
Speaker: Oktavia Hrund
Speaker: Nicolás Echániz

Content of the Session:

In the last two decades, the Internet--and digital technologies in general--were perceived to be the "great liberator" that would protect individual rights, preserve democracy, promote free speech, empower communities/ persons with disabilities, and enable innovation. Certainly, a great deal of success have been achieved in these areas, and there is still significant promise for the future.

At the same time, there are several emerging threats to Digital Future of the world including, but not limited to including Fake News, post-Truth politics, surveillance & censorship, data & identify theft, and online hate & abuse threaten the very premises that were perceived as the unique to the Internet. Our freedoms and rights are challenged by these threats, raising questions on the integrity of the Internet.

Free and Open Source Software offers a powerful set of responses to address these issues and to defend the Digital Future, particularly from the perspective of communities. These can be examined under the following broad heads:

- Technology & tools for secure, anonymous use of the Internet
- Possible Safeguards that address the processes of content generation, validation and distribution
- Enabling Policy Frameworks  

The session, organized as a Breakout Group Discussion, will address these three challenges and the role of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) in addressing them.

The session will take stock of the existing and emerging tools, technologies, platforms and methodologies that can protect end-users and user communities from developments that undermine the credibility and trust that users repose on the Internet.

Relevance of the Session:
A significant challenge that the Internet faces today--particularly of relevance to the IGF Theme of "Shape Your Digital Future"--is that the public trust in the Internet is being undermined by a number of new developments. Unless there are co-ordinated, comprehensive responses from civil society, it is possible that the credibility of the Internet will diminsh, thus threatening our common digital future. In turn, this may cause over-responses from other actors, such as national Governments to further limit access, monitor & restrict Internet use.

This session will discuss following aspects in three breakout groups:

1. Tools and Technologies provided by FOSS that help in different ways such as safe & secure use of the Internet including operating systems, access tools, anonymizers, productivity tools, and content management systems, to emerging developments and the Blockchain for decentralized, peer-to-peer, un-tamperable record-keeping. Developments such as IoT and Algorithms & Machine Learning that have negative and positive sides will also be discussed.   

2. Methodologies, processes and best practices in dealing with the processes of content generation, validation and distribution, that can address the challenges of providing authenticated content in appropriate forms and languages in multiple delivery modes (desktop, mobile, audio etc) including decentralized, democratized knowledge creation and dissemination.

3. Policy initiatives that support and enable communities to use the Internet safely, securely and reliably, upholding rights and freedoms, and considering aspects such as access, equitable digital opportunities, language issues, risk reduction and child safety.  

Interventions:
The interventions by speakers are planned on the following lines:

1. Welcome,introduction, Session Objectives and Format: 5 min

2. Initial presentation of Issues: The moderator will provide the overall context of the session, particularly the Challenges faced (10 min)

3. Overview of the Breakout Group Discussions: The Co-Moderator will provide an Overview of the Breakout Group discussions (including remote participation)

4. Breakout Group Discussions: Participants will divide themselves into 3 groups, taking up discussions on the above themes.  (35 minutes)

Discussions will be led by the speakers identified a-priori, who will also present the group reports in the following session.

5. Group Presentations, Discussions and Summing Up (30 min)
The Group Leaders will present the report of the discussions in the group.

Diversity:
Diversity considerations for the session would be fully met. The current list of organizers and speakers are significantly diverse from gender and geographic considerations. Since the prime target of the session is Civil Society, particularly communities in developed regions as well as emerging economies, there is a definite emphasis on civil society and technical community participation. However, the organizers are confirming participation from Academia, Business and Government as this is a topic that enhances Multi-stakeholder cooperation.

Online Moderator: Ms. Maureen Hilyard
Rapporteur: Mr. Satish Babu

Online Participation:
Our Remote Moderator is Ms. Maureen Hilyard, a veteran IGF participant and a former MAG Member. Ms. Okite is an avid promoter of not only online participation but accessible online participation tools.
with this background we are certain that the online presenters/participants will be given priority and made to feel like they are in-person at the workshop.
The online moderator will ensure that:

(a) Remote participation is open during the initial presentations as well as during the group report presentations/discussions, and any comments or questions from the remote participants are raised during the presentations

(b) During the Breakout Session, remote participants are connected to one of the three/four breakout groups, and that there is two-way sharing with remote participants and get feedback .

In addition to Remote Participation using the host-provided tools, we would also be using Twitter as a live medium to solicit questions, comments or suggestions.

Discussion facilitation:
The Breakout Group Discussion format has been chosen specifically to encourage participant interaction. This will be away from the norm Q & A sessions, but encourage knowledge sharing and further network ,that would birth future projects under the same topic.

The overall objective of the session organizers is to striving for a balance between Speakers, Local Participants and Remote Participants.

This will be communicated in all invitations to the workshop through various networks and also during the Welcome as part of the format of the session, so that everyone is aware of the fairness aspect of division of time.

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: Yes
Link to Report: https://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/content/igf-2016-day-2-room-7-w...

Additional Speakers: 

1. Ms. Sarah Kiden, Academia,
skiden@gmail.com; +256 782467074
Lecturer, Virtual University of Uganda.

2. Mr. Mwendwa Kivuva , Technical ,  AFRINIC, Kenya
Contact: lordmwesh@gmail.com

3. Mr. Ojedeji, Seun , Technical/Academia (Remote Speaker)
contact : seun.odejedi@gmail.com
Chief Network Engineer, Federal University Oye-Ekiti, Nigeria

Agenda: 

1. Welcome, Introduction, Session Objectives and Format (Mr. Satish Babu, 5 min)

2. Initial presentation of Issues (Ms. Mishi Choudhary, 10 min)

3. Overview of the Breakout Group Discussions (Ms. Judy Okite, 5 min)

4. Breakout Group Discussions in Three Groups  (35 minutes)
Group Leaders: Glenn McKnight, Sarah Kiden, Olivier Crepin-Leblond

5. Group Presentations and Discussions (Group Leaders: 15 min + 15 min discussions)

6. Closing comments (Judy Okite, 5 min)

 

...

Session Organizers
avatar for Satish Babu

Satish Babu

Chair, APRALO/ICANN
Volunteer with ICANN At-Large, Internet Society, and IEEE. Founder-Chair, ISOC-TRV, India. Early Internet user and advocate. Profile available at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Satish_Babu


Wednesday December 20, 2017 11:50 - 13:20 CET
Room XXII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

15:00 CET

DC on Accessibility and Disability
Session Organizers
AJ

Andrea J. Saks

Chairman JCA-AHF, ITU
ACCESSIBILITY FOR PERSON WITH DISABILITIES BOTH VIRTUAL AND PHYSICAL, TO INCLUDE REMOTE PARTICIPATION AND REMOTE PARTICIPATION TOOLS THAT STILL ARE INACCESSIBLE TO THE BLIND BETTER ACCESS TO ICTS INCLUDING BROADBAND , LONG DISTANCE LEARNING, REMOTE EDUCATION,ACCESSIBLE WEB SITES AND... Read More →


Wednesday December 20, 2017 15:00 - 16:00 CET
Room XXIII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

16:10 CET

Digital Inclusion for Africa (OF55)
The following questions will be tackled in the Open Forum
- What measures are needed to ensure digital inclusion of people in Africa?
- What should governments do to foster digital literacy for their nations?
- What are the policies and measures needed to address the technology skills gap between Africa and the rest of the world?
- Are African education systems up to the challenge of delivering a digital workforce?
- What should be done to further unleash ICTs potential economic and societal benefits?
- How can technology help in facing crisis and disasters in Africa?
- In what ways can new technologies be applied to early warning systems in Africa?
- What policies are needed to expand the use of grievance redress mechanisms in Africa?
- What are the best practices and success stories for digital inclusion in Africa that can be observed and transferred?
Tag 1: Digital Inclusion
Tag 2: #increasingconnectivity
Tag 3: Digital Literacy
Name(s) of Speaker(s):
Mr. Menghestab Haile, Country Director - Egypt, World Food Programme (WFP) Cairo, Egypt 
Ms. Mary Uduma, Chair of Nigeria Internet Governance Forum 
Dr. Jimson Olufuye, Chair of AFICTA
Mr. Moctar Yedaly, Head of Division, Infrastructure and Energy Department, African Union Commission 

Name of Online Moderator: Ms. Heba Abd ElHameed
Background Paper: igf_2017-idsc_open_forum_final_version.pdf
Past IGF Participation: Yes
Report Link:
Name: Ms. Nirvana Farrag
Organizational Affiliation: The Egyptian Cabinet Information & Decision Support Center-IDSC
 

Session Organizers

Wednesday December 20, 2017 16:10 - 17:10 CET
Room XXIII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)
 
Thursday, December 21
 

10:40 CET

DC on Connecting the Unconnected
Thursday December 21, 2017 10:40 - 11:40 CET
Room XII - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

10:40 CET

Let the people speak: using evidence from the Global South to reshape our digital future (WS188)

Proposer's Name: Ms. Alison Gillwald
Proposer's Organization: Research ICT Africa/University of Cape Town
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Roxana Barrantes
Co-Proposer's Organization: Instituto Estudios de Peruanos
Co-Organizers:
Helani Galpaya, civil society, LIRNEasia Aileen Aguero, civil society, Instituto Estudios de Peruanos


Session Format: Round Table - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: South Africa
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Co-Proposer:
Country: Peru
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speaker: Alison Gillwald
Speaker: Helani Galpaya
Speaker: Helani Galpaya
Speaker: Anriette Esterhuysen
Speaker: Alice Munyua
Speaker: Claire Sibthorpe
Speaker: Alexandre Barbosa
Speaker: Masanori Kondo

Content of the Session:
The roundtable discussion hinges on the ICT access and use surveys undertaken in 2017 across 16 countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America that bring to the forum some of the only rigorous and publicly available evidence on the status and determinants of digital inequality. Based on nationally representative surveys the findings provide not only real numbers of Internet access in the Global South but enable the disaggregation of data on the basis of sex, location, income, age and other grounds. The studies look 'beyond access' at the intersectional challenges faced the marginalised in developing countries, providing insights into affordability, digital literacy, gender disparities, urban-rural divides, and unevenness of youth awareness and use. The findings also provide critical insights into the drivers of OTT adoption, mobile money use, the extent of online micro-work, the use of m-and e-government services and social networking as the driver of Internet take-up.
A multistakeholder discussion, with prompted audience and online audience interventions, will explore some of the arising governance and policy implications of the findings if any progress is to be made towards meeting the Sustainable Development Goals and to developing measurements to assess that progress.
The 90 minute roundtable will include:
Introduction: Three 10-minute flash presentations from Africa, Asia and Latin America with a brief comparative overview. (30mins)
Moderator: Questions of clarification on methodology and findings. (5 minutes)
Moderator: Questions to presenters at on critical role of demand side data for evidence-based policy formulation (5 minutes)
Moderator: Questions to national agencies and multilateral agencies on the utility of the findings and remaining/arising gaps and commitment to development of national indicators (10 minutes)
Moderator: Questions to industry associations on complementary role (and commitment to collaboration) of supply-side/big data to demand-side data for evidence-based policy (10 mins)
Moderator: Discussion on factors driving digital inequality - human development (income, education) rural location, age, and intersection of these in relation to gender - policy challenges of state coordination, demand stimulation, + audience participation (10 mins)
Moderator: Discussion of affordability and user strategies to access and USE the Internet, including public wi-fi, zero rated, dynamic and bundled services and OTTs + audience participation (10 mins)
Moderator: Discussion on factors driving Internet take-up and what people use it for - social networking, mobile money, microwork + audience participation (10 mins)
Moderator: Discussion on rights online/offline - creating a trusted environment as demand stimulation strategy - users awareness, experiences and practices of security, privacy, surveillance, censorship, freedom of expression + audience participation (10 mins)
Wrap up.


Relevance of the Session:
The recognition of the imperatives of digital inclusion in the UN Agenda for Sustainable Development and calls for 'significantly increased access to affordable Internet in least developed countries by 2020’ together with 'the enhanced use of enabling technologies to promote women’s empowerment’ is to be welcomed as a mechanism to ameliorate inequality in the 21st century. The problem is that with the patchy, outdated, supply-side data currently being used for global comparison and unable to measure digital inequality in the predominantly prepaid mobile markets in developing countries, we do not know where we stand now nor can we ascertain if, and when, we have progressed toward the goals and targets of the the SDGs. The findings of these demand-side studies go some way to fulling these gaps in a number of developing countries and providing a baseline and some perspective from the global South on how we might shape our digital future in a more equitable way. Besides the socio-economic factors driving and inhibiting internet adoption and use, the research probes user experiences of a range of issues fundamental to Internet governance - user trust, cyber security, privacy, surveillance and censorship and explores them as factors in inhibiting Internet take-up and use. Discussion of the findings in a multistakeholder environment not only provide an opportunity to influence more positive policy outcomes but hopefully highlights the need for political commitment to rigorous, transparent and open public statistics for evidence-based policy.


Tag 1: #accessandinclusion
Tag 2: Policies Enabling Access
Tag 3: Internet & ICTs for the Sustainable Development Goals

Interventions:
This 90-minute session will provide a essential evidence update for decision-makers in the global South through a roundtable discussion between researchers and policy-makers following three flash presentations on Africa (Alison Gillwald), Asia (Helani Galpaya) and Latin America (Roxana Barrantes of 10 minutes each with a brief comparative overview.
The moderator, Alexandre Barbosa who has extensive experience in indicators development as the chair of the ITU Indicator Expert Group and executive director of CETIC in Brazil, will take some audience questions of clarification on the presentations and methodology and will then pose some policy questions to demonstrate how demand side surveys are essential to identifying the exact points of policy intervention that cannot be sourced from supply side data or even big data analytics in the predominantly prepaid mobile markets that characterise the Global South. (10 minutes).
Discussants from regional and national governments and state agencies (Juan Manuel Wilches, Commissioner, Commission for Communications Regulation, Colombia) and Americo Muchanga, Mozambican regulator and Communications Regulatory Association of Southern Africa chairperson) and multilateral agencies (Alice Munya, African Union) will then have an opportunity to respond to the findings, evaluate their utility and contribution to administrative data and identify outstanding research needs from a policy perspective. Roundtable discussion will ensue, with vacant seats at the roundtable for audience participation.
Industry associations (Dr Masanori Kondo, Deputy Secretary General, Asia Pacific Telecommunity, and Claire Sibthorpe from GSMA Connected Women) will then speak about how supply-side (operator) data can be used complementarily with demand-side data for a complete evidence-base for policy formulation.
With the access indicators covered the presentations, the discussions will focus on some of the key findings on digital inequality in relation to income, sex, urban-rural location and education. The remainder of the time will be spent on the 'beyond access' challenges that are constraining Internet take- up, many of which intersect with the factors of inequality described above. As affordability is a major constraint on not only take up of services but use, some time will be spent on the findings on expenditure on communications services but also the findings on the multiple strategies users have developed to access the Internet, including free public wi-fi, zero-rated services and low cost and dynamically bundled products.
The two remaining issues that will be highlighted is the drivers of internet take up and use, particularly social networking, but also some insights into mobile money and online micro-work and the findings from the cyber awareness and practice component which specifically focused on trust issues related to building confidence in coming and remaining online, specifically awareness and practices in relation to online rights, cyber security, privacy, surveillance, freedom of expression, censorship, stalking and sexual harassment. Anriette Esterhysen from APC who is also leading the UNESCO Internet Indicators project will engage with the presenters on public interest governance frameworks to manage these issues on the net and to also, together with Claire Sibthorpe from GSMA Connected Women, Alice Munya from the African Union, who have advocated extensively for gender equality,speak more generally about strategies of digital inclusion.
Wrap up (5 minutes)


Diversity:
The proposed speakers are predominantly women, but there are men represented from each region - Africa, Asia and Latin America. The presenters of the flash presentations are researchers from think tanks in each region. The discussants are from national government agencies, regional multilateral organisations

...

Session Organizers
avatar for Dr. Alison Gillwald

Dr. Alison Gillwald

Executive Director, Research ICT Africa
Alison Gillwald (PhD) is the Executive Director of Research ICT Africa (RIA), an African digitalpolicy and regulatory think-tank that works across 20 African countries. She is also adjunct-professor at the University of Cape Town’s Nelson Mandela School of Public Governancewhere... Read More →


Thursday December 21, 2017 10:40 - 12:10 CET
Room XXVI - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

11:50 CET

‘Local content: an opportunity for underserved regions’ (WS238) and IGF Best Practice Forum on Local Content (Shared meeting)

NOTE :    the organisers of the WS 238 'Local cotent: an opportunity for underserved regions' and the 2017 IGF Best Practice Forum on Local Content, which were scheduled in parallel decided to share a timeslot and meeting room. This will allow both sessions on local contnent to share their audiences and feed directly into each other's discussion.  
[ WS238 was originally scheduled in room XXVII, on Thur 21 Dec, 11:50-13:20]

Below is the original description of both sessions.


*** WS238 Local Content: an opportunity for underserved regions'
Proposer's Name: Mr. Abdelaziz HILALI

Proposer's Organization: Mediterranean Federation of Internet Associations (FMAI)
Co-Proposer's Name: Ms. Roula Mikhael
Co-Proposer's Organization: Maharat Foundation
Co-Organizers:

Prof Abdelaziz Hilali, Civil Society, Mediterranean Federation of Internet Associations (FMAI)
Ms. Roula Mikhael, Civil Society, Maharat Foundation
Mr. Khalid Ibrahim, Civil Society, Gulf Centre for Human Rights

Session Format: Round Table - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: Morocco
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Co-Proposer:
Country: Lebanon
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speaker: Roula Mikhael

Speaker: Aziz Hilali

Speaker: Layal Bahnam

 Speaker: Khalid Ibrahim

Speaker: Marie Noemie Marques

Speaker: Glenn McKnight

 

Content of the Session:

The Internet has become a critical enabler of social and economic change, advancing a sustainable information society for all.

However, citizens of developing countries such as the Arab World do not produce digital content in local language that is compatible with grassroots needs of local communities, whereas the content that is most important to people is in their own language and relevant to where they live and work.

This workshop will highlight the main factors impeding the creation of local content in the region from a free flow of information perspective and economic and social development.

The main factors are related to:

  • The access to internet and the level of internet infrastructure development
  • The access to education mainly digital and information literacy
  • The local content in local language as a mean of effective existence on the net and a tool for development
  • Open access to content including content production, use, reuse and redistribution  
  • The content availability and the existence of legal restrictions on content affecting providers as well as content creators

One of the possible recommendations of the Workshop would be the adoption of further policies and initiatives to encourage local content creators to develop content tailored for the needs of local communities as well as to create an enabling learning environment in order to improve basic and digital literacy, critical thinking ability, and media and information skills targeting especially youth and women.Agenda:
Introduction of the speakers and the topic by the Moderator – 10 min
Round of short presentations by the 5 speakers – TOTAL – 25 min
Open Debate - All participants attending the Roundtable – 50 min
Wrap up by the Moderator - 5 min

Agenda:

·       Introduction of the speakers and the topic by the Moderator – 10 min

·       Round of short presentations by the 6 speakers – TOTAL – 30 min

·       Open Debate - All participants attending (in person or remotely) the Roundtable – 45 min

.       Wrap up - 5 min

Relevance of the Session:
This session will explore the issue of Local content development by local people in local language which is one of the main important ways to make the underserved regions benefit from the technology. How can you shape your digital future if you don't contribute in the digital content production, use, reuse and redistribution, and if your grassroots don't use it for their daily life (basic and digital literacy, critical thinking ability, media and information skills). 

Tag 1: Digital Rights
Tag 2: Content
Tag 3: Digital Economy

Interventions:
After the introduction of the topic and the speakers by the moderator, each of the 6 speakers will have 5 minutes to address briefly an aspect of the roundtable topic. Then an open discussion will be launched where every participant (in person or online) will have the same rights to speak and express him/her self. The speakers contribute in this open discussion and give insights and feedback when necessary.

Diversity:
The 6 speakers are from Africa, Asia Pacific, Europe and North America. They are gender balanced (3 men and 3 women), from Civil Society, Private Sector, Academia, and media.

Onsite Moderator: Mohamed Tijani BEN JEMAA
Online Moderator: Hussein Elsherif 
Rapporteur: Karim Abdulrady

Online Participation:
Remote participation will be an essential channel of participation in our workshop. Our online moderator will be also in charge of following the tweets. We will use the IGF remote participation platform.
For a successful remote participation, the announcement of the workshop will be spread widely, not only among the IGF participants, but also all the other networks highlighting the easy remote participation.
The Remote contributions will be taken alternatively with the in person contributions, and if the remote queue is longer than the one in the room, we will take more remote participants than from the room.  

Discussion facilitation:
Speakers will have very short slots (5 minutes) to introduce the various aspects of the topic. This is to free more time for the audience (in the room and online). All attendees have the same rights and are treated equally. Remote participants also will speak when they want, and they will be given the priority in the extreme cases  

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: No
Link to Report: 

Agenda: 

·       Introduction of the speakers and the topic by the Moderator – 10 min

·       Round of short presentations by the 6 speakers – TOTAL – 30 min

·       Open Debate - All participants attending (in person or remotely) the Roundtable – 45 min

.       Wrap up - 5 min






*** BEST PRACTICE FORUM ON LOCAL CONTENT ***

The 2017 Best Practice Forum on Local Content is an intersessional activity, leading into the 12th annual IGF meeting.

The availability of locally relevant content is an important driver for the development of the Internet, globally, and in rural or developing areas in particular. The creation of local content is one of the elements that contributes to making the Internet relevant and attracting new users.
 
In preparation of this session, the BPF collected examples of projects and initiatives stimulating the creation of relevant local content for the local Internet user, and identified factors that helped or hindered these project to achieve success.  (NOTE: it is still possible to submit examples at https://goo.gl/forms/swORcnYZBhKerDlE3 ).

The current draft BPF output document is available at https://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/content/best-practice-forums-7  .

Community input received via the online review platform and during the meeting will be used to further enrich the document, and the final BPF Cybersecurity output will be publish after the IGF meeting as part of the tangible results of the IGF’s 2017 intersessional activities.

Session Organizers
avatar for Wim Degezelle

Wim Degezelle

Consultant
Internet policy Analyst and Consultant.Consultant IGF Secretariat - Best Practice Forums 
avatar for Miguel Ignacio Estrada

Miguel Ignacio Estrada

General Manager, LACTLD
avatar for Raquel Gatto

Raquel Gatto

Regional Policy Advisor, Internet Society
avatar for Abdelaziz HILALI

Abdelaziz HILALI

AFRALO Chair, AFRALO


Thursday December 21, 2017 11:50 - 13:20 CET
Room XII - A United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

12:30 CET

Use of the Internet in educational projects (OF14)
The use of Internet in the basic education in Cuba has been grown in the last 2 years. Several projects has been made as initiatives of different provinces of the country in which have been participated other countries of the region. In the last days we finished a new version of the Jundando Aulas collaborative project in which we celebrate the world environment day with a videoconference where the students made a role play in which everyone prepared a speech representing different countries of the world as a UN summit. Also we are preparing a project for all the connected schools where the students will work together to solve a problem using our own educational social network Ula Ula.
Tag 1: Internet
Tag 2:
Tag 3:
Name(s) of Speaker(s): Fernando Ortega Cabrera
Dayron Pérez Alonso

Name of Online Moderator: Isabel Gutiérrez Pérez
Background Paper:
Past IGF Participation: Yes
Report Link: http://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/es/node/3439
Name: Mr. Pérez Alonso Dayron
Organizational Affiliation: Ministerio de Educación de la República de Cuba
 

Session Organizers

Thursday December 21, 2017 12:30 - 13:30 CET
Room XXVII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)