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MAIN/ SPECIAL SESSION [clear filter]
Monday, December 18
 

10:00 CET

LOCAL INTERVENTIONS, GLOBAL IMPACTS: HOW CAN INTERNATIONAL, MULTISTAKEHOLDER COOPERATION ADDRESS INTERNET DISRUPTIONS, ENCRYPTION & DATA FLOWS
This main session discusses the impacts that national policy initiatives may have on the global Internet environment and the jurisdictional issues still to be solved. Experts will discuss three different but interrelated topics: Internet disruptions (such as shutdowns and slowdowns), encryption, and data flows. The session shall also discuss how multistakeholder dialogue can leverage its role towards the solution of major problems along these three main topics.

While there is widespread awareness about human rights-related aspects of these issues, there is little discussion about the aggregate effects that they might have on the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals. Considering that the IGF 2017 will be held in Geneva, this session also aims at involving intergovernmental organizations that can feed into the debate and share their experiences in implementing cooperative efforts towards the solution of those problems.

Following main policy questions will be addressed during the debate:

  • Internet disruptions. How has the debate around Internet disruptions evolved during recent years, especially regarding new motivations and reasons for disruptions and how they impact on the global infrastructure of the Internet?
  • Encryption. Has the debate around encryption evolved to a point where it poses a threat to public and national security that requires international cooperation to solve the issues of “local interventions, global impact” regarding encryption?
  • Data flows.  How can international cooperation help solve the issues of "local interventions, global impact" regarding data flows, especially if there is an inherent conflict between the collection/use of data as a tool for development and humanitarian projects and the protection of privacy?
  • Regarding issues of Internet disruptions, encryption and data flows, how can international organisations adapt to the ever-changing data policy environment while working on improving human rights, peace, and well-being?
  • How can efforts for cooperation and capacity development improve strategies, planning, outreach, and effectiveness in these areas to ensure concrete, positive communication and direction?

 

Moderator: Tereza Horejsova, Geneva Internet Platform and Diplo Foundation

Rapporteur: Katherine Townsend, USAID and Africa Open Data Conference Movement

Invited speakers are listed below:

Technical Community and Academia

  • Riana Pfefferkorn, Stanford, USA (confirmed)
  • Demi Getschko, NIC.br, Brazil (confirmed)
  • Raúl Echeberría, ISOC, Uruguay (confirmed)
  • Stefania Milan, Amsterdam University, NL (confirmed)

Civil Society

  • Melody Patry, Access Now, UK (confirmed)
  • Bertrand de la Chapelle, Internet and Jurisdiction, France (confirmed)
  • Anriette Esterhuysen, APC, South Africa (confirmed)
  • Luis Fernando García, R3D, México (confirmed)

Private Sector

  • Fiona Asonga, Telecommunications Service Providers Association of Kenya (confirmed)
  • Vint Cerf, Google, USA (confirmed)
  • Christoph Steck, Telefonica, Spain (confirmed)
  • Paul Nicholas, Microsoft, USA (confirmed)

Government

  • Stefan Schnorr, BMWI, Germany (confirmed)
  • Farida Dwi Cahyarini, MCIT, Indonesia (TBC)

Intergovernmental and International Organizations

  • David Kaye, UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression (TBC)
  • Anne Carblanc, OECD, France (confirmed)
  • André Laperrière, Global open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition, UK (confirmed)
  • Moctar Yedaly, African Union (confirmed)

 


Session Organizers
avatar for Wisdom Donkor

Wisdom Donkor

President / CEO, Africa Open Data and Internet Research Foundation
Specialization:E-government Network Infrastructure and E-application, Internet Governance,  Open Data policies platforms & Community Development, Cyber Security,  Domain Name Systems, Software Engineering, Event Planning & Management, Human Resource Development and Planning
avatar for Flavio Rech Wagner

Flavio Rech Wagner

Technical Consultant, CGI.br
Professor for Computer Science and Engineering at the UFRGS (Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul), in Porto Alegre, Brazil.


Monday December 18, 2017 10:00 - 13:00 CET
Main Hall - Room XVII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)
 
Tuesday, December 19
 

09:00 CET

SPECIAL SESSION ON 'DATA FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT ROAD MAPS'

Debates over the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) over its several years of effort led to a renewed and broader agreement about sustainability, and then led to the endorsement of the Sustainable Development Goals. These goals are not only built on the MDGs, but also supplant them, as of course, a greater awareness of the need for broader engagement to achieve the change that societally and economically is needed to shape our world into  the world we want. The adoption of the SDGs by the United Nations, renewed understanding of how the major challenges that the world is facing are interdependent. No country can really expect to be its own island, whether in its need for food, water, energy, or jobs. The SDGs are a foundational platform that all countries are challenged with the adoption and the endorsement by the United Nations to consider how to address the challenges.

The SDGs provide a new vision for development, a vision that does not assume Development is isolated, but understands and admits that it is changing the role of women and youth; bringing access to ICTs to small farmers and midwives in developing countries; advancing access to information and education for children that have not school rooms, or limited access to books in their language to help them learn.

In response to growing awareness about the importance of sustainable development initiatives and activities and to meet what has been established as necessary goals for the world, the SDGs offer the potential guidelines to move the world toward a sustainable future.

Looking back at the MDGs, this session proposes to look at the learning of the MDGs very much like a prologue to what must be done now.  In fact, the SDGs are already finding ways to gain supporting implementation initiatives. In addition, to take into account lessons learned about lack of data, and lack of focused reporting on achievements.

In order to know where we are, we need data.  We cannot plan how we move toward achieving the SDGS unless we have better understanding. As a wise sage once said: If you do not know where you are going, any road will get you there. In addition, another study the past to know the future.  Many reports are published by businesses, NGOs, and think tanks. Reports are published annually by UN agencies.  However, it is very difficult to determine what is factual from all these reports, and who provides the input to the studies, so it is difficult to determine where “we” are.

The implementation of the 17 UN SDGs in developing countries is only a fortnight away, and as it looks, the UN could be up against more than it really understood. Creating a form of standardized reporting is very challenging for developing countries, unless there is a sort of “road-map” that is built on their present status in terms of data gathering mechanisms and analysis.

 According to World Bank Report (Poverty Global Practices Group and Development Data Group April 2015), a significant number of developing and least developed nations across Asia and Africa lack sufficient data to be used by business and policymakers in making estimates.  

 Lack of data and why the need for sufficient data:

Data helps experts weigh the feasibility of goals, provides clarity on the nature of the problem and facilitates statistic-based supervision and evaluation of development progress. It is paramount in intermediate outcome tracking and determination of whether the paths predicts that a country or the UN will achieve or miss on an SDG and its targets. Most developing countries lack data even in priority areas and that has come as one of the most pressing challenges the 2030 Agenda is likely to face. As has been suggested, a little under 30 of the world’s poorest countries have extremely limited data to measure the trend of SDGs indicators.

Mechanisms for gathering data:

One fundamental data collection method is through conducting household surveys, which will provide important data for evaluation and analysis of individual wellbeing in terms of health and education statuses, agriculture, energy and consumption levels. Another reliable method is the use of administrative records, which can provide statistics on demographic changes and trends, for instance, to aid in the formulation of health, education and social protection policies.

However, we must be realistic that developing countries often lack resources to conduct the aforementioned surveys; some have poor and unreliable registration systems, which may force analysts to rely solely on non-statistical estimates. To add to the challenges, one SDG target requires that legal identity, including birth registration, be provided for all by 2030. Relying only on telecom operators/mobile operators to report on connectivity, for instance, is a very flawed measurement, as has been demonstrated by Lirne Asia’s research. 

Data measurement mechanisms that are suitable for developing and developed countries need updating.  Moreover, this needs to happen quickly. It may be that grants and training programs for developing countries will be needed to help strengthen the organizations at the national levels so that they can enhance their ability to gather reliable data and be more comprehensive with what they provide to the UN registry bodies if SDGs are to be met.

The workshop on “Data for sustainable development road-maps” session will bring together a diverse set of UN Agency representatives responsible for gathering statistics; other kinds of data producers, business professionals and users, as well as innovators in the field (national and international experts) to discuss the way forward, including exploring how new technologies and approaches that can be used to strengthen the data ecosystem globally.

The session would be organized around five themes aiming to achieving the following outcomes:

Theme 1: Addressing data gaps and financing

●          present the current situation for countries to produce SDG indicators and  
            highlight data gaps.

●          discuss opportunities to strengthen census and survey regimes.

●          discuss opportunities to further develop the administrative data system with the
            view of ensuring harmonization, comparability, and quality of data.

●          present possibilities for using new data/ technology to address identified data
            gaps and engage new actors.

●          to determine how alignment with national and regional agendas will impact data  
           collection in developing countries and indicator production and reporting.

  •       Identify possible approaches for addressing the funding gap (both in terms of
          mobilizing additional resources and using those available more effectively)

Theme 2: Encouraging data use

●          have an open dialogue with key users on how data/ statistics produced can   
            better meet their needs.

●          Identify ways to harness the opportunity of the momentum around data for the
            SDGs to strengthen the sharing, accessibility and presentation of data.

●          raise the profile of data production and use with key stakeholders including
            policy- makers to encourage the use of improved data for evidence-based decision-making and accountability.

Theme 3: Strengthening the Data Ecosystem

●          solidify the multi-stakeholder approach to achieving and measuring the SDGs,
            and  create new data communities.

●          Identify and discuss solutions to major funding gaps.

●          Identify and discuss solutions to major capacity gaps.

●          Provide an opportunity for country-to-country learning in the SDG indicator
            production process.

●          ensure high-level political and policy-maker buy-in for the Roadmap process.

●          Identify key issues for the policy and enabling environment for the data
            ecosystem. 

Theme 4: Improving Systems

  • How can the promotion of transparent data support the implementation of the SDGs at both the national and global levels?
  • What kind of data regime is needed for the most effective and robust system for the implementation of SDGs?
  • To what extent would data availability contribute to delivery of national and global goals?
  • Learning from home grown and other non-traditional systems of information management in developing countries.

Theme 5: Policy and enabling environment   

This theme will focus on the necessary policy initiatives in relation to data production, sharing and use as well as the enabling environment to ensure data quality, interoperability, security and protection. 

...

Session Organizers
MC

Marilyn Cade

CEO, ICT Strategies
Security, Stability and Resiliency; engagement of SMEs and business groups from developing countries and regions; Internet Governance and implications for ICANN's continued stability. Business users interest in ICANN. Questions about ICANN's origins, and progress toward an international... Read More →
avatar for Wisdom Donkor

Wisdom Donkor

President / CEO, Africa Open Data and Internet Research Foundation
Specialization:E-government Network Infrastructure and E-application, Internet Governance,  Open Data policies platforms & Community Development, Cyber Security,  Domain Name Systems, Software Engineering, Event Planning & Management, Human Resource Development and Planning
avatar for Zeina BOU HARB

Zeina BOU HARB

Head of International Cooperation, OGERO Telecom


Tuesday December 19, 2017 09:00 - 12:00 CET
Room XXVI - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

10:00 CET

HIGH LEVEL THEMATIC SESSION 'IMPACT OF DIGITIZATION ON POLITICS, PUBLIC TRUST & DEMOCRACY’

“The impact of digitisation on politics, public trust, and democracy                                                 

The digital space, as a cornerstone of the public policy space, can be a great enabler for democratic discourse and participation, as well as inclusive policy-making. At the same time, the misuse of the digital public policy space can lead to the distortion of truth, mistrust in public information, and misrepresentation of public opinion. 

This session will discuss both the opportunities and the challenges that digitisation brings to the digital political sphere, the public trust, and democracy. Discussions will revolve around ways of strengthening the benefits of democratic participation and inclusion via digital means, limiting the negative impact of the misuse of the public policy space, and rebuilding trust among online users. 

The session will also address the roles and responsibilities of different stakeholders. It will look at issues such as government policies aimed at creating more inclusive policy-making processes through the use of digital tools, the responsibility of Internet intermediaries for the dissemination of fake news and false news that can influence political processes, and the elements that can help rebuild trust among users. Also, the session will discuss the role of media actors in a democracy and the implications of the ongoing structural change in the media ecosystem. Most importantly, the session will look into whether and how digital literacy, education, and awareness-raising could be the key towards empowering citizens not only to take advantage of digital tools, but also to deal with the challenges related to the misuse of the digital public space. 

‘Good stories’, ‘bad stories’, and lessons learnt will be explored as part of the discussions. 
 
Host Chair:
 Mr. Philipp Metzger, Director General, Swiss Federal Office of Communications (OFCOM) 
 
Moderator:
 Ms. Nathalie Ducommun, Talk Master of Swiss Television RTS 
 
Remote Moderator:
 Ms. Katharina Hoene, DiploFoundation 
 
Agenda:
 
Introduction by Mr. Philipp Metzger, Director General, OFCOM - 10 min 
  
Part 1: Benefits - 80 min 
Remarks from first group of panelists (8 people, 2min input each) 
Discussion with audience 
Part 2: Challenges - 80 min 
Remarks from second group of panelists (8 people, 2min input each)
Discussion with audience 
Conclusions and wrap-up - 10 min 
 
Policy questions:
 
Part 1 (Benefits): What are the benefits that digitisation brings/can bring to political processes, democracy, and the public trust? How can they be leveraged? How can digital tools be most effectively used to strengthen democratic participation and restore public trust in the online space?  Who can make this happen? Part 2 (Challenges): What are the challenges that digitisation brings/can bring to politics, democracy, and the public trust? How can they be addressed, and by whom? What are the roles and responsibilities of the different stakeholders? How can we ensure that digital tools can be trusted as key resources for democratic participation and inclusive societies? Can digital literacy, education, and awareness-raising be the key towards empowering citizens to deal with the challenges related to the misuse of the digital public space? 
 
Speakers
:

Mr. Martin Chungong, Secretary General, Inter-Parliamentary Union 
Ms. Nighat Dad, Executive Director, Digital Rights Foundation, Pakistan 
Mr. Bobby Duffy, Global Director, Ipsos Social Research Institute 
Ms. Farida Dwi Cahyarini, Secretary-General, Ministry of Communication and Information Technology, Indonesia 
Mr. Hossam Elgamal, Chairman, Egyptian Cabinet Information and Decision Support Center (IDSC) 
Ms. Mariya Gabriel, Commissioner for Digital Economy and Society, European Commission
Mr. Hasanul Haq Inu, Minister of Information, Bangladesh
Ms. Malavika Jayaram, Executive Director, Digital Asia Hub
Mr. Frank La Rue, Assistant Director-General Communication & Information, UNESCO
Ms. Claudia Luciani, Director of Democratic Governance and Anti-discrimination, Council of Europe
Ms. Dunja Mijatovic, International Expert on Human Rights and Media Freedom, Board Member of Access Now
Mr. Gonzalo Navarro, Executive Director, Asociación Latinoamericana de Internet
Mr. Jean Paul Philippot, President, European Broadcasting Union
Ms. Nanjira Sambuli, Digital Equality Advocacy Manager, World Wide Web Foundation
Mr. Sébastien Soriano, Chairman ARCEP (French National Regulatory Authority for Telecoms and Posts), Chairman BEREC (Body of European Regulators for Electronic Communications)
Mr. Robert Strayer, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Cyber and International Communications and Information Policy, U.S. Department of State

 




Tuesday December 19, 2017 10:00 - 13:00 CET
Main Hall - Room XVII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

15:00 CET

EMPOWERING GLOBAL COOPERATION ON CYBERSECURITY FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT & PEACE
Hi, thanks for indicating interest in our main session. 

Since the inception of the Internet Governance Forum (IGF), Cybersecurity has been one of the key areas of concerns and discussions, with the Internet community stakeholders expressing grave concerns about the future of the Internet, its value for development, peace and preservation of our mutual interests in the cyberspace. The global economic and development agenda as enshrined in the resolution adopted by the General Assembly of the United Nations in 2015, Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable development, continue to be under a serious threat from being achieved if the global actors decline to shape into global actions commitments and ideas on global cooperation on cybersecurity and preservation of the stability of the Internet.

The existence of critical global cybersecurity issues have underscored the urgent need for a renewed multi-stakeholder dialogue on the security of cyberspace for peace and sustainable development. However, there have been various institutional frameworks for dealing with cooperation on cybersecurity, which are operating in silos, and are yet to be translated into a meaningful global course of action.

It is expected that the IGF main session on cybersecurity would contribute to a global multistakeholders dialogue stream that empowers Global Cooperation on Cybersecurity for Sustainable Development & Peace. Furthermore, the session would build upon the previous efforts and outcome IGF 2015 and 2016 main session on cybersecurity.

For details on the highlights and list of confirmed speakers, please visit https://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/index.php?q=filedepot_download/5077/722.

Session Organisers:

Olusegun Hamed Olugbile
Member, UN-IGF Multistakeholder Advisory Group (MAG) CEO, Continental Project Affairs Associates & Member of Nigeria Cybercrime Advisory Council, Nigeria olugbileoh@cybersecurity.gov.ng solugbile@gmail.com.

Juan Alfonso Fernández González
Member, UN-IGF Multistakeholder Advisory Group (MAG) Advisor, Ministry of Communications, Cuba
juan.fernandez@mincom.gob.cu juan.fdz.glz@gmail.com

With the Support from;
Markus Kummer - BPF Cybsercurity ( kummer.markus@gmail.com)
Maarten Van Horenbeeck - BPF Cybersecurity  (maarten@first.org)
Eleonora Anna Mazzucchi  - IGF Secretariat

Session Organizers
avatar for Segun Olugbile

Segun Olugbile

CEO, Continental Project Affairs Associates
My work focused on solutions and strategic policy advisory to issues on cybersecurity, Internet governance and e-development. My work is aimed at shaping policy-making, by engaging with stakeholders globally and raising awareness on the decisive role of technology, through participation... Read More →


Tuesday December 19, 2017 15:00 - 18:00 CET
Main Hall - Room XVII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)
 
Wednesday, December 20
 

10:00 CET

DYNAMIC COALITIONS: CONTRIBUTE TO THE DIGITAL FUTURE!

‘Dynamic Coalitions: Contribute to the Digital Future!’

[90 minutes – Wednesday 20 December, 10.00-11.30 – Room XVII, UNOG]

Dynamic Coalitions (DCs) are some of the IGF’s longest-standing community groups that do continuous work around a chosen theme in Internet Governance, during and between the IGFs. They were first formed at the IGF in Athens in 2006 with the aim of organizing discussion groups around Internet governance themes, both of particular interest to members and with a wider public significance. Starting out with a small number, there are now 17 active DCs whose work has evolved to encompass a range of activities and outputs.

Building on their successful main session held in 2016, DCs have agreed to come together again at IGF 2017 to discuss the topics they cover – from Accessibility and Disability, Internet of Things and Blockchain Technologies, to Child Online Safety, Community Connectivity and Gender and Internet Governance, Publicness and Core Internet Values.

The main session will strive to be as inclusive as possible of DCs’ wide variety of themes and issues. Each of the participating coalitions will make brief interventions. These will be prompted by a moderator who, acting as an ‘agent provocateur’, will ask questions to challenge DCs and stimulate a defense or explanation of the major points in their work. A discussion with participants will follow. DCs will bring into this session substantive output papers, available online as background reading for IGF participants.

 

Agenda

I. Introduction on DCs and their Role within the IGF [~5 mins]

II. Q&A between Moderator and DC Speakers [~4 mins x 13 DCs, 55 mins total]  

III. Interaction with Participants In-Room and Online [~30 mins]

 

Policy Questions

Policy questions will be wide-ranging and relate to the work of each of the DCs represented in the main session. The issues will be as diverse as the topics to which DCs have dedicated themselves, whether technical, rights-related or related to broader questions of “Internet values”.

Specific questions will be identified by each DC and drawn from the following output papers:

DCAD Substantive Paper for IGF 2017 DCs Main Session (DC on Accessibility and Disability)

IGF 2017 Substantive Paper (DC on Blockchain Technologies)

Community Networks: the Internet by the People for the People (DC on Community Connectivity)

DC Core Internet Values discussion paper 2017: Focus on Freedom from Harm (DC on Core Internet Values)

An Internet For #YesAllWomen?: Women's rights, gender and equality in digital spaces (DC on Gender and Internet Governance)

Input Document for the DCs Main Session at the Internet Governance Forum 2017 (DC on Innovative Approaches to Connecting the Unconnected)

Internet of Things Good Practice Policies (DC on Internet of Things)

Zero rating Map (DC on Network Neutrality)

Preview of the 2017 DCPR Outcome: Platform Regulations (DC on Platform Responsibility)

Dynamic Coalition on Public Access in Libraries: Summary (DC on Public Access in Libraries)

Open Digital Trade: Background Paper [Full Report] (DC on Trade)

The Charter of Human Rights and Principles for the Internet Educational Resource Guide (v2) (Internet Rights and Principles Coalition)


Chair(s)
and/or Moderator(s)

Moderator: Tatiana Tropina, Senior Researcher, Max Planck Institute


Panellists/Speakers

There will be one speaker from each of the participating DCs. The designated speakers have been agreed upon within each DC, as follows:

-Mr. Shadi Abou-Zahra, Dynamic Coalition on Accessibility and Disability (DCAD)

-Mr. Benedikt Schuppli, Dynamic Coalition on Blockchain Technologies (DC-Blockchain)

-Mr. John Carr, Dynamic Coalition on Child Online Safety (DC-COS)

-Dr. Luca Belli, Dynamic Coalition on Community Connectivity (DC3)

-Mr. Olivier Crépin-Leblond, Dynamic Coalition on Core Internet Values (DC-CIV)

-Ms. Bishakha Datta, Dynamic Coalition on Gender and Internet Governance (DC-GIG)

-Prof. Christopher Yoo, Dynamic Coalition on Innovative Approaches to Connecting the Unconnected (DC-Connecting the Unconnected)

-Mr. Maarten Botterman, Dynamic Coalition on Internet of Things (DC-IoT)

-Dr. Luca Belli, Dynamic Coalition on Network Neutrality (DCNN)

-Dr. Nicolo Zingales, Dynamic Coalition on Platform Responsibility (DCPR)

-Ms. Esmeralda Moscatelli, Dynamic Coalition on Public Access in Libraries (DCPAL)

-Mr. Jeremy Malcolm, Dynamic Coalition on Trade (DC-Trade)

-Ms. Minda Moreira, Internet Rights and Principles Coalition (IRPC)

 
In-room participant engagement/interaction

The participants will be informed at the outset that questions and open discussion will take place after all DCs have intervened. Participants will be encouraged to put themselves in a ‘questions queue’ while interventions are in process, by indicating this to a designated person in the room. This person will be on standby to write them into the queue. After DCs have spoken, the moderator will call on the participants in the queue to ask their questions from the floor.

 

Online interaction

A designated remote moderator will queue questions from online participants during the interventions and feed them into the discussion segment.


Connections with other sessions

DCs have individual sessions in the programme that will help shape their interventions in this main session. The majority of DCs’ individual sessions are scheduled before the main session so as to facilitate this.


Desired results/outputs & Possible next steps

This session will be an opportunity for DCs to raise the profiles of new or under-the-radar issues, particularly ones that have been little discussed at the IGF, like blockchain technologies, or are seldom even discussed in the IG context, like increased accessibility for persons with disabilities. New DCs, such as the DC on Trade, will also have the chance to brief on their respective topics and work. After the session, participants should be inspired to take these issues back into their own communities for further discussion.

Feedback in this session will also be valuable in helping each DC determine the future course of its work. Participants may confirm, question or challenge any of the conclusions and assertions put forward by DCs, as well as introduce new ideas that could be formative for their discussions. At the same time, DCs will have the chance to illustrate why engagement in their work is important. Greater membership in DCs and their wider exposure to the IGF community is a secondary key objective of the session.

...

Wednesday December 20, 2017 10:00 - 11:30 CET
Main Hall - Room XVII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

11:30 CET

NRIs PERSPECTIVES: RIGHTS IN THE DIGITAL WORLD

Wednesday, 20 December Room XVII
First Segment: 11:30-13.00
Lunch Break: 13:00-15:00
Second Segment: 15:00-16:00

More than 95 countries and regions have established succesful IGF processes for their respective communities.  At their annual IGF meetings, a number of the national, regional and Youth IGF initiatives (NRIs) have been discussing extensively the notion of rights in the digital world, its importance and current practices in different countries and regions of the world, as well as the global policies and practices and its implications to their respective communities.

Session structure and format:

The first segment will be 90 minutes long, followed by a 120 minutes lunch break. After that, the session will be continued with 60 minutes as the second segment slot.

 The initial 90-minutes segment will focus on an interactive discussion on the topic as addressed by the participating NRIs, across and between the national, regional, subregional and Youth IGFs, while the second 60-minutes long segment will be a continuation of an interactive discussion with the audience, both remotely and in the room, then engaging appointed rapporteurs delivering major conclusions and recommendations for the wider community and final wrap up comments from the co-moderators.

 Agenda

Each of the NRIs who have committed to participate whether onsite or remotely will identify their designated representative to speak  at the NRIs main session.

 The session will be opened with a short and comprehensive presentation of the NRIs Network Overview and Evolution, delivered by the NRIs Focal Point, in collaboration with the NRIs. 

The co-moderators will introduce the session concept, and open the floor for the NRIs interventions. NRIs will be invited to respond to one of the developed policy questions (presented below), with an effort to achieve geographical balance across five IGF regions.

Confirmed NRIs that will speak onsite: 

  1. Afghanistan IGF
  2. IGF-USA
  3. Panama IGF
  4. Netherlands IGF
  5. Sri Lanka IGF
  6. China IGF
  7. Spain IGF
  8. Germany IGF
  9. DR Congo IGF
  10. EuroDIG
  11. Youth LACIGF
  12. Colombia IGF
  13. SEEDIG
  14. Tunisia IGF
  15. Nigeria IGF
  16. West Africa IGF
  17. Nepal IGF
  18. Portugal IGF
  19. Brazil IGF
  20. Croatia IGF
  21. Kenya IGF
  22. Youth IGF Turkey
  23. African IGF

 The session will be moderated across these five policy guiding questions:

  1. How do the NRIs communities understand the rights in the digital world?
  2. From the perspective of your NRI, what are our rights in the digital world and do you see the access as one of those?
  3. Are there any challenges and limitations in exercising our rights in the digital world, according to the views of your NRI?
  4. How is the development of new technologies affecting our rights in the digital world, from the perspective of your NRI?
  5. What are the recommendations/advices from your NRIs in approaching the identified problems? Can the multistakeholder model here be an effective approach for making improvements?

Onsite co-moderators:

  • Janis Karklins, Ambassador of Latvia to UNOG

  • Anja Gengo, IGF Secretariat

Online co-moderators:

  • Lianna Galstyan, Armenia IGF, SEEDIG

  • Oksana Prykhodko, Ukraine IGF

Rapporteurs:

  • Dustin Phillips, ICANNWiki/IGF-USA

  • Sajia Yarmal, IGF Afghanistan



Wednesday December 20, 2017 11:30 - 13:00 CET
Main Hall - Room XVII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

15:00 CET

NRIs PERSPECTIVES: RIGHTS IN THE DIGITAL WORLD (2ND SEGMENT)

Wednesday, 20 December Room XVII
First Segment: 11:30-13.00
Lunch Break: 13:00-15:00
Second Segment: 15:00-16:00

More than 95 countries and regions have established succesful IGF processes for their respective communities.  At their annual IGF meetings, a number of the national, regional and Youth IGF initiatives (NRIs) have been discussing extensively the notion of rights in the digital world, its importance and current practices in different countries and regions of the world, as well as the global policies and practices and its implications to their respective communities.

Session structure and format:

The first segment will be 90 minutes long, followed by a 120 minutes lunch break. After that, the session will be continued with 60 minutes as the second segment slot.

 The initial 90-minutes segment will focus on an interactive discussion on the topic as addressed by the participating NRIs, across and between the national, regional, subregional and Youth IGFs, while the second 60-minutes long segment will be a continuation of an interactive discussion with the audience, both remotely and in the room, then engaging appointed rapporteurs delivering major conclusions and recommendations for the wider community and final wrap up comments from the co-moderators.

 Agenda

Each of the NRIs who have committed to participate whether onsite or remotely will identify their designated representative to speak  at the NRIs main session.

 The session will be opened with a short and comprehensive presentation of the NRIs Network Overview and Evolution, delivered by the NRIs Focal Point, in collaboration with the NRIs. 

The co-moderators will introduce the session concept, and open the floor for the NRIs interventions. NRIs will be invited to respond to one of the developed policy questions (presented below), with an effort to achieve geographical balance across five IGF regions.

Confirmed NRIs that will speak onsite: 

  1. Afghanistan IGF
  2. IGF-USA
  3. Panama IGF
  4. Netherlands IGF
  5. Sri Lanka IGF
  6. China IGF
  7. Spain IGF
  8. Germany IGF
  9. DR Congo IGF
  10. EuroDIG
  11. Youth LACIGF
  12. Colombia IGF
  13. SEEDIG
  14. Tunisia IGF
  15. Nigeria IGF
  16. West Africa IGF
  17. Nepal IGF
  18. Portugal IGF
  19. Brazil IGF
  20. Croatia IGF
  21. Kenya IGF
  22. Youth IGF Turkey
  23. African IGF

 The session will be moderated across these five policy guiding questions:

  1. How do the NRIs communities understand the rights in the digital world?
  2. From the perspective of your NRI, what are our rights in the digital world and do you see the access as one of those?
  3. Are there any challenges and limitations in exercising our rights in the digital world, according to the views of your NRI?
  4. How is the development of new technologies affecting our rights in the digital world, from the perspective of your NRI?
  5. What are the recommendations/advices from your NRIs in approaching the identified problems? Can the multistakeholder model here be an effective approach for making improvements?

Onsite co-moderators:

  • Janis Karklins, Ambassador of Latvia to UNOG

  • Anja Gengo, IGF Secretariat

Online co-moderators:

  • Lianna Galstyan, Armenia IGF, SEEDIG

  • Oksana Prykhodko, Ukraine IGF

Rapporteurs:

  • Dustin Phillips, ICANNWiki/IGF-USA

  • Sajia Yarmal, IGF Afghanistan


Wednesday December 20, 2017 15:00 - 16:00 CET
Main Hall - Room XVII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)

16:00 CET

GENDER INCLUSION AND THE FUTURE OF THE INTERNET

Internet governance discussions and processes have always strived for Inclusion, diversity and participation as their core principles. This ranges from key and emerging issues, to stakeholder groups to regional diversity. Intersecting within and between them are issues of gender, both as an analytical lens, as well as basic equality in participation.

Topics related to gender have formed part of the debates at IGF from the beginning. Different stakeholder groups have brought to the process a gendered focus and lens to policy issues on gender and internet governance; sexuality and freedom of expression; addressing online-gender based violence; access to the internet and the gender digital divide; the importance of fostering women’s leadership in innovation and STEM fields; economic, social and cultural rights including education; privacy and surveillance and its gendered impact; to name a few. 

The Geneva Declaration of 2003 committed all stakeholders to ensuring that the Information Society enables women's empowerment and their full participation on the basis of equality in all spheres of society and in all decision-making processes. That gender remains a challenge was affirmed in the December 2015 WSIS+10 resolution of the General Assembly: “We express concern, however, that there are still significant digital divides, such as between and within countries and between women and men, which need to be addressed through, among other actions, strengthened enabling policy environments and international cooperation to improve affordability, access, education, capacity-building, multilingualism, cultural preservation, investment and appropriate financing. Further, we acknowledge that a gender divide exists as part of the digital divides, and encourage all stakeholders to ensure the full participation of women in the information society and women’s access to new technologies, especially information and communications technologies for development.” (para 6 A /70/L.33)

In the past 5 years, there has also been a growing number of workshop proposals that aim to facilitate more focussed discussions on specific issues related to gender, as well as a stronger integration of gender into key and emerging themes. The IGF Gender Report Card – introduced by APC and the Gender DC in 2012 – have been a sustained effort to monitor inclusion in terms of issues as well as numbers, supported by the IGF Secretariat since 2014. 

This clearly demonstrates investment and interest by the IGF community to both deepen and broaden the integration and inclusion of gender in the process.

The SDG Goal 5 that looks at a range of targets related to gender equality and empowerment of women and girls specifically cites ICTs as an important area for policy development. This provides an opportunity as well as a clear impetus for to seriously consider gender in current developments that will impact on the future of the internet. 

This main session aims to foreground a discussion on gender and internet governance and policy. It will provide a space for stock-taking and discussion on key issues that have emerged and are emerging, including challenges and recommendations for ways forward; as well as specifically, what does it mean to integrate gender into internet governance processes?

Agenda

The session will be divided into two segments and aims to be lively and participatory in approach, helmed by two dynamic moderators who have rich knowledge and experience in this area.

The first segment will discuss key issues related to gender and internet policy, including access, intersectionality, new and emerging technologies and addressing online gender-based violence. The second segment will facilitate a discussion on internet governance processes, mechanisms and structures, and aim to surface some recommendations on improvements to better integrate gender.

Moderators

  • Bishakha Datta (Gender Dynamic Coalition, Civil Society, India)
  • Emilar Gandhi/Ebele Okobi (Facebook, Private Sector, SADC)

Discussants

  • Dubravka Šimonović, UN Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women, Intergovernmental – In conversation
  • David Kaye, UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression (Intergovernmental)
  • Veronica Birga, OHCHR (Intergovernmental)
  • Tara Denham, GAC (Government)
  • Doreen Bogdan (ITU, Intergovernmental)
  • Carlos Henrique Zimmermann, Brazil (Government)
  • Lissette Perez Perez, Official of the Directorate of International Relations and Foreign Trade of the Ministry of Communications of Cuba (Government)
  • Chat Garcia Ramilo, Association for Progressive Communications (Civil Society)
  • Chenai Chair, Research ICT Africa, Africa, Academia/Civil Society)
  • Maria Paz, Derechos Digitales, LAC, Civil Society)
  • Avri Doria IRTF Human Rights Protocol Consideration Research Group (Technical Community)
  • Bob J Alotta (Aestraea Foundation, Civil Society)
  • Desiree Milosevic (Afilias, Private Sector)
  • Lise Fuhr, Director General of the European Telecommunications Network Operators Association (ETNO)

Session Organizers
avatar for Raquel Gatto

Raquel Gatto

Regional Policy Advisor, Internet Society
avatar for Jac sm Kee

Jac sm Kee

Women's Rights Programme Manager, APC, APC (Association for Progressive Communications)
Gender, Sexuality, Access, Internet Governance, Ending online gender-based violence, Sexual surveillance and big data, Freedom of expression & gendered hate speech


Wednesday December 20, 2017 16:00 - 18:00 CET
Main Hall - Room XVII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)
 
Thursday, December 21
 

10:00 CET

DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION: HOW DO WE SHAPE ITS SOCIO-ECONOMIC AND LABOR IMPACTS FOR GOOD?

Digital Transformation: How Do We Shape Its Socio-Economic and Labor Impacts for Good?

This session aims to facilitate a thoughtful dialogue on the process of digitization and digital transformation, examining its effect on the global value chain, new business models, and the future workforce. 

Cross-border data flow has accelerated economic globalization while the flows of international trade and finance have flattened since 2008. The increase in digital flows is underpinned by a process of statistically-evidenced vertiginous digitization. The digitization of products that were traditionally delivered physically but can also be transmitted electronically over the Internet, plays an important role in this process, opens new possibilities for e-commerce, and is an essential part of achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). 

The increased use of data will be required to realize the potential of the digital transformation. In the near future, data flows will increase under the pervasive Internet of Things (IoT). Data analytics, machine learning, and artificial intelligence (AI) are perceived to be fundamental to the transformation of both developed and developing economics. Under the ‘sharing economy’, digital platforms enable direct exchanges between service providers and potential customers. They also reshape organizations and the future of the work, necessitating a dialogue about how to enable an inclusive digital transformation which benefits everyone.

[AGENDA]
This session will be divided into two parts: The first part will be dedicated to understanding how digitization is affecting global digital production and commerce, and impacting development. The second part will discuss the impact of the digital economy on the workforce in both  developed and developing countries, especially examining a relationship between the consequences of the sharing economy and automation and job creation / destruction, productivity, and labor rights, taking into account the distinct contexts of declining / increasing demographics.

I. Introduction (7 min.)
   Mr. Kenta Mochizuki, MAG member (Yahoo Japan Corporation)

II. Part 1: Digitization, global production, and flows of digital commerce (80 min.)

○       Short initial remarks from discussants (20 min.)

○       Discussions (50 min.)

○       The discussion will seamlessly combine initial remarks with interactive reactions from the audience/participants (10 min.)

III. Part 2: Digitization, automation, and employment issues (85 min.)

○       Short initial remarks from key discussants (24 min.)

○       Discussions (50 min.)

○       The discussion will seamlessly combine initial remarks with interactive reactions from the audience/participants (10 min.)

IV: Conclusions and wrap-up (8 min.)
     Ms. Renata Aquino Ribeiro, MAG Member (E.I. Consulting)

[POLICY QUESTIONS]
Part 1: Digitization, global production, and flows of digital commerce (60 min.)
1) How is the new digital ecosystem different than the traditional ecosystem? What are considerations for enabling the development of healthy digital ecosystems? What are the main policy issues related to global production value chains in the digital environment?

2) What are the contributions of different types of e-commerce (B2B, B2C, B2G) to the global economy and how is e-commerce distributed worldwide? What is the role of e-commerce marketplaces for the inclusion of SMEs and developing market contenders in global trade chains?

3) How do emerging technologies, such as big data, IoT, and AI affect e-commerce? What are the main policy options that facilitate or create obstacles to global trade flows?

4) How does digitization enable new business models and encourage entrepreneurship?

5) What roles do international organizations play in facilitating the discussion of these policies and how can they work with other actors to promote better coordination in the field of e-commerce? 

Part 2: Digitization, automation, and employment issues (90 min.) 
1) What are some of the lessons learned from past market transformations, e.g., agricultural to industrial, and how does digitization assist in making the most of the lessons (taking also into account the context of sharing economy)?

2) Are there tools that can better measure and predict the impact of ICT on the labor market? Are there tools that can predict what skills are needed going forward?

3) What are the ways in which the labor market will most likely be affected by digitization and automation? What policies should be considered in an environment of increasing demographics in developing countries? Do ICTs actually assist developed countries in addressing understaffing situation while maintaining the diversity of a career choice as well as mitigating risks to the well-being of the labor force?

4) What will be the necessary professional skills to take advantage of the jobs created in a highly digital society and what are examples of innovative approaches to training by which workers can be more effectively connected to more opportunities? Should different approaches be considered for people at different stages in their career?

5) How can education and capacity development play a role in this new scenario and what kind of efforts would be necessary for public / private stakeholders to promote the education and capacity development in both developed and developing countries?

 [CHAIRS AND/OR MODERATORS] 
We will have several moderators since moderation should be dynamic, proposing questions and making sure that the “debate-style” flows smoothly, and that the audience has the chance to participate. Because of the importance of this role, we will continue to brainstorm on who the moderators should be based on a pool of names below.

【Part I】
Dr. Makoto Yokozawa, Nomura Research Institute/Kyoto University (*Co-chair of OECD/BIAC Committee on Digital Economic Policy)

【Part II】
1) Ms. Paola Pérez, Vice-President of the ISOC Venezuelan Chapter / Chair of the LACNIC Public Policy Forum (Introductory Part)
2) Dr. Nathalia Foditsch, Research Fellow at Cornell College of Business - Washington, DC (Closing Remarks)

[ONLINE MODERATOR]
Mr. Auke Pals, Student Information Science at the University of Amsterdam, innovation consultant, entrepreneur and chair of the Dutch Digital Youth Counsel

[PANELISTS AND/OR SPEAKERS]

In this regard, we will have at least 2 panelists/speakers from each 5 sector as follows:

【Part I】
Mr. Oscar Gonzalez, Government of Argentina
Mr. Torbjörn Fredriksson, UNCTAD
Ms. Ankhi Das, Facebook
Ms. Farzaneh Badiei, Georgia Institute of Technology
Dr. Walid Al-Saqaf, Södertörn University

【Part II】
Ms. Ana Cristina Amoroso das Neves, Government of Portugal
H.E. Eng. Hossam El Gamal, Government of Egypt
Ms. Valentina Scialpi, EU
Mr. Philip Jennings, UNI Global Union
Mr. Edmon Chung, DotAsia Organization
Ms. Karen McCabe, IEEE

[VIP INTERVENTION FROM THE AUDIENCE]
【Part 2】
Mr. Ndicho Bambo, Samuel, Yaoundé, Foreign Service Officer, Ministry of External Relation, Cameroon

[PLAN FOR IN-ROOM PARTICIPANT ENGAGEMENT/INTERACTION?]
First of all, because our session will be “debate-style”, there will be active interaction among expert speakers/panelists and the mood will be set for audience interventions and questions. To put it another way, we will make every single effort to create an atmosphere for active interaction not only among the panelists/speakers but between the panel and the audience.

Second, in order to foster interactive discussion among all participants, there will be the opportunity of an open mic. We will ask moderators for 2 sub-sessions to pay closer attention to the reaction of the audience during the sessions and involve the audience as much as possible.

[REMOTE MODERATOR/PLAN FOR ONLINE INTERACTION?]
Interventions from online participants will be given equal priority as to those from the physical audience. Onsite and online moderator will coordinate closely. To broaden participation, online interaction will rely on the WebEx platform and will also include social media (Twitter and Facebook). Online moderators will be in charge of browsing social media using some hashtags (to be defined). We will try to have English, French, Portuguese, and Spanish online moderators, and a systematic queue.

In addition, we plan to use a “Twitter wall” which can be either a physical monitor at the session or a tag with a Storify-like interface where people can interact with before, during, and after the session. Since we have ever collaborated with Youth IGFs, we will ask Youth IGF volunteers to be part of our team and support our session on this aspect. We are confident that it will introduce dynamism and reinforce the goal of maximizing the opportunities for the involvement of the audience in situ and remote.

[CONNECTIONS WITH OTHER SESSIONS?]
Our session connects with multiple workshops of IGF 2017 which deal with in some way the topic of digital economy. A workshop titled “WS #141 Equipping populations with the skills to shape and secure their digital future” is one example which directly relates to our session. Since mos

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Session Organizers
avatar for Kenta Mochizuki

Kenta Mochizuki

IGF/MAG Member, Principal / Attorney at Law (New York), Public Policy, Corporate Intelligence, Yahoo Japan Corporation
Kenta Mochizuki is a Japanese representative member of the Multistakeholder Advisory Group of UN Internet Governance Forum (IGF/MAG) as well as Principal / Attorney at Law (New York) in Yahoo Japan Corporation. As an international lawyer, he specializes a wide range of international... Read More →
avatar for Renata Aquino Ribeiro

Renata Aquino Ribeiro

Researcher, E.I.
MAG IGF CS. Full bio: http://bit.ly/renataineng



Thursday December 21, 2017 10:00 - 13:00 CET
Main Hall - Room XVII - E United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG)